introduction not listed by title by place by editor by publisher by special subject covers
1789-1810 1811-1820 1821-1830 1831-1840 1841-1850 1851-1860 1861-1872

American children’s periodicals, 1861-1872

A newstand of American children’s periodicals, 1861-1869
A newstand of American children’s periodicals, 1870-1872

This bibliography—with a detailed introduction—is available as an ebook from Barnes & Noble, Kobo, Apple, Scribd, 24symbols, and amazon.com.

[NOTES: Unless noted, page size is the size when trimmed, usually for binding; page size is approximate. Page size is described as height by width, thus: [measurement in inches]″ h x [measurement in inches]″ w

about frequency: semimonthly: twice a month (usually 24 issues per year); biweekly: every other week (usually 26 issues per year); bimonthly: every other month (usually 6 issues per year)

about availability: selections or complete issues available for free on the Internet, or available at libraries on microform or in databases

abbreviations:

APS, American Periodical Series (microfilm; also, digital database)

AAS, American Antiquarian Society, Massachusetts

AASHistPer, American Antiquarian Society Historical Periodicals (digital database; series 1-5)

Batsel, Union List of United Methodist Serials, 1773-1973, comp. John D. Batsel and Lyda K. Batsel (Evanston, Illinois: n.p., 1974)

NUC, National Union Catalog

OCLC, database available at many institutions via WorldCat (information may also be available in the NUC)

ULS, Union List of Serials in Libraries of the United States and Canada, ed. Winifred Gregory (New York, New York: H. W. Wilson Co., 1927)]

Our Paper ; 1861

cover/masthead: 1861

edited by: John D. Henderson?

published: New Orleans, Louisiana

frequency: semimonthly

description: 4 pp.; price, 12″ h; price, 2¢/ copy

• vol 1 #14 is Dec 1861

• Religious focus

relevant information: Printed at the Magic Press, Book and Job Printing Office, 73 Poydras St.

source of information: AASHistPer; AAS

available: AASHistPer, series 4

Young Folks’ Monitor, and The World We Live In ; April 1861-after June 1861

cover/masthead: 1861

edited by: R. M. Mansur

published: Mount Vernon, Maine: R. M. Mansur.

• AAS has: Boston, Massachusetts: S. Hawes. AAS copy is June 1861

frequency: monthly

description: 8 pp.; price, 33¢/ year

relevant information: The Monitor apparently began as the Glenwood Valley Times (1855-1861); Rowell says that it was “enlarged… into a small quarto” that lasted a year.

• Listed as one of the monthly periodicals taken “at the present time” in the village of St. Johnsbury, Vermont, in Jan 1862; the list probably was compiled in Dec 1861. Only one subscriber. [“Papers and Periodicals”]

• Like many children’s periodicals at the time, the Monitor included puzzles and rebuses; unlike other periodicals, the Monitor promised to send to all subscribers who sent correct answers to all the puzzles in an issue, “a book or some article which retails from $2 to $3.” Subscribers sending four or more correct answers and the name of one new paying subscriber would receive the Monitor for a year or “if preferred, a copy of an interesting book containing 324 illustrated rebusses, enigmas, riddles, &c.” [1 (June 1861); p. 24]

relevant quotes: “The Young Folks’ Monitor. This is the title of a little paper devoted to the cause of temperance and the moral culture of youth, to be issued by our friend R. M. Mansur, esq., of Mt. Vernon. It will be published monthly, at the low rate of 33 cents per year, and we hope it will receive a liberal support.” [“The Young Folks’ Monitor”]

• From the description: “The aim of this paper is to instruct and elevate the young, inculcating principles of Temperance and Morality. … No quack medicines, lottery, or humbug notices inserted in it at any price.” [1 (June 1861); p. 24]

continues: the Glenwood Valley [Maine] Times

continued by: The Musical Monitor (for adults)

source of information: AAS catalog; OCLC; notices, etc., below

available: AASHistPer, series 4

bibliography:

• “The Young Folks’ Monitor.” Maine Farmer 29 (28 March 1861); p. 2.

• “Papers and Periodicals.” St. Johnsbury Caledonian [St. Johnsbury, Vermont]; p. 3.

• E. Rowell. “The Press of Kennebec County.” In History of the Press of Maine, ed. Joseph Griffin. Brunswick: 1872; p. 99-100. [archive.org]

The Sunday School Paper for the South ; May 1861-April 1862?

published: Charleston, South Carolina: South Carolina Sunday School Union, 1861-1862?; printed by R. M. Stokes, 1861; printed by James Phynney, April 1862

frequency: monthly (irregular)

description: April 1862, 4 pp. Prices: 1 to 4 copies, 25¢ per copy/ year; 5 copies, $1/ year; 20 copies, $3.50/ year; 50 copies, $8/ year; 100 copies, $15/ year

• Orders were sent to the Rev. W. T. Farrow, State Secretary, Spartanburg, C. H., or to W. N. Hughes, Charleston, S. C.

• Religious focus

relevant quotes:

• “The South Carolina Sunday School Union has issued the first number.” [Christian Observer; in Stroupe]

• The Paper was, like most Southern children’s periodicals during the Civil War, intended to substitute for Northern periodicals: “The Sunday School Paper for the South is … intended to supply the place of the Youth’s Sunday School Gazette and other Northern papers now discontinued.” [“Papers for the South”]

source of information: Kennerly; notices, etc., below

bibliography:

• notice. Christian Observer 20 June 1861.

• “Sunday School Paper for the South.” The Weekly Advertiser [Montgomery, Alabama] 19 June 1861; p. 3.

• “Papers for the South.” The Charleston Daily Courier [Charleston, South Carolina] 29 June 1861; p. 1.

• Sarah Law Kennerly. “Confederate Juvenile Imprints: Children’s Books and Periodicals Published in the Confederate States of America, 1861-1865.” PhD diss. University of Michigan, 1956.

• Henry Smith Stroupe. The Religious Press in the South Atlantic States, 1802-1865. Durham, North Carolina: Duke University Press, 1956; p. 124.

The Portfolio ; June-Sept 1861

edited by: Samuel L. Hammond • Frederick W. Miller, June-July 1861

published: Charleston, South Carolina: Samuel L. Hammond and Frederick W. Miller, 1861

frequency: monthly

description: 1 copy, $1/ year; 10 copies, $9/ year; 30 copies, $22/ year; 50 copies, $40/ year

relevant information:

• The Daily True Delta states that the Portfolio was a weekly.

• That Frederick Miller was no longer connected with the Portfolio was announced in July 1861.

• Subscribers were requested to call for their papers at Shecut’s News Depository in October.

relevant quotes:

• The prospectus was … bellicose: “At this particular time, when we have severed every political tie which bound us in vassalage to an arrogant and oppressive North; when we have plucked our stars from the hateful and contaminating atmosphere of fanaticism, and placed them in the clear blue of our own Southern sky, that they may shine encircled with a halo of truth, adorning our own bright sunny land with their glorious lustre; when we have erected a new Republic, declared our independence to the world, it peculiarly becomes us as a people, to withdraw that patronage, hitherto so liberally bestowed upon those who have proven themselves our worst enemies, and extend a helping hand to those ‘to the manor born,’ who are true to our institutions, true to our principles, and to our native home; we should throw off all shackles that hold us in any wise dependent upon a section whose creed is inimical to our dearest rights; and whose people we can no longer contemplate with the pure and holy love of brotherhood. The intelligence of a people is ever estimated by the character of their literature. We have intellects which will pale before none! Authors, whose graceful pens drop inklets of gold, and strew shining pearls of thought. let us, then, turn our faces from the North, and seek literature for old and young within our own borders—establish literary enterprises of our own, and foster and maintain them. Believing that it is the desire, nay intention, of our people to do this, we propose to establish a SOUTHERN JUVENILE PERIODICAL, and thereby fill a vacuum, which has existed since the demise, years ago, of the sweet little ‘Rose Bud.’ We, therefore, confidently appeal to all to aid in establishing the enterprise upon a firm and substantial basis. Believing that we appeal not in vain, we shall at the first, or during the month of May, commence the issue of ‘THE PORTFOLIO,’ a monthly periodical, devoted to ‘Truth, Virtue and Temperance;’ which shall not only become an agreeable and amusing companion for the young, but, by the observance of a high moral tone, seek to instruct the rising mind, and teach the youthful heart. As far as we are able, we will make it interesting to all. Many of our most gifted writers, both of prose and verse, have kindly consented to assist in making THE PORTFOLIO rich with sparkling gems—the Southern asphodels of thought. … We will spare no pains to make THE PORTFOLIO the juvenile paper of the South. It will be neatly printed in clear type, upon fine book paper, quarto form, of good size; and among its many attractions will contain a ‘Promenade,’ in which our fair friends are invited to walk with us into every southern heart and home that is open to us; a ‘Joker’s Budget,’ which shall unfold rare witticisms; a ‘Little Farmer,’ and ‘Dairy Maid’s Apartment;’ a ‘Floral Column,’ in which the prettiest flowers will bud; together with a corner devoted to the ‘Brigade of Infantry;’ where our smallest friend can shine.” [Yorkville Enquirer 17 May 1861]

• Some flattering words on the early days: “We understand that the proprietors of this enterprise, notwithstanding the disturbed condition of the times, are meeting with a very liberal support, and that the first number, which is anxiously looked for, will be certain to appear about the middle of this month. Miss Tuttle, a young lady of intelligence and perseverance, has been constituted a regular agent to receive subscriptions, and her prepossessing and winsome solicitations have been most favorable to the enterprise. We wish Miss T., and the proprietors, who have been fortunate in their selection of such an agent, still further success.” [Mercury 4 May 1861]

• On subscribing: “[The Portfolio] is the title of a juvenile publication about to be commenced in Charleston, S. C., by Mr. A. J. Hamilton, formerly of this city. Such a work as this is needed in the South, at this time, and we commend the work to the patronage of our readers. Mr. Shecut, of Charleston, is now in our city, and will be pleased to receive subscriptions for this work. He will wait upon our citizens for this purpose to-day, and those who have little folks in the family, or as friends, should take a copy of the Portfolio. Any information in the regard to the work will be readily and cheerfully given by our young friend, Mr. Shecut.” [“The Portfolio” 23 May 1861]

• The Picayune noted why the Portfolio was founded: “This is a handsome quarto monthly devoted to truth, virtue and temperance, especially for the behoof of the young folks. … We are glad to see this laudable effort to fill the place left vacant in the supply of periodicals by the inhibition of Northern publications. We owe it to ourselves to sustain all such enterprises efficiently.” [11 June 1861]

• Advertisements and notices often reflected a southern reliance on printed works from the North. The Macon Daily Telegraph asserted that the “excission of all Northern prints of this character should create a demand for the Portfolio.” [21 June 1861] The Keowee Courier pointed out that “the printing is equal to any book-work we have seen coming from the North.” [22 June 1861] The Charleston Daily Courier took a chance to slam Northern periodicals: “The Portfolio comes in very seasonably for the younger portion of our community who have until recently been compelled to put up with very indifferent juvenile papers from the North, not at all adapted to the instruction and entertainment of youthful Southern readers. This attractive little sheet is edited and pubished by S[a]muel L. Hammond and Frederick W. Miller, and fills the gap formerly occupied by the Rose Bud and Boquet, [sic] and never, since the discontinuance of these popular periodicals, filled by any substitute.” [“Papers for the South”]

• Advertisements stated that the Portfolio was designed to appeal to a wide audience: “Though intended to be a juvinile [sic] paper, it yet contains matter of interest to the general reader. … those wishing a good family paper, and at the same time desiring to advance SOUTHERN LITERATURE, can accomplish both purposes by subscribing to this paper.” [Telegraph 19 June 1861]

• One newspaper invoked some classics in its notice: “The July and August numbers are neatly printed, and the contents show good taste, in the editorial management of the paper. The Portfolio, we believe, is the only publication of the kind in the Confederate States, and should meet with the most liberal patronage. Those in the South who have been giving their money to support the Schoolfellows, and Museums, and Sunday School Advocates of Yankeedom should drop those publications, and give their hearty support to the Southern work. That is the best way to place it on a firm foundation, and make it equal if not superior to any other of the kind published.” [Constitutionalist]

• Notices tried to make subscribing into a patriotic gesture: “It is the only paper of the kind in the South, and as a patriotic enterprise, deserves a liberal support.” [Lancaster News 14 Aug 1861

source of information: Kennerly; notices, etc., below

available:

• “Beauregard—We are Free,” by Mrs. C. Ladd, was reprinted in the Lancaster News [Lancaster, South Carolina]. This acrostic poem repeats “We are free!” at the end of each of five stanzas; the first letters spell out the last names of Edmund Ruffin, Roger Pryor, Louis Wigfall, and P. G. T. Beauregard, Southerners who took part in the bombardment of Fort Sumter, South Carolina, in 1861.

bibliography:

• Claude. “Juvenile Papers for Southern Children.” The Charleston Daily Courier [Charleston, South Carolina] 8 Feb 1861; p. 1. And reply: “The Children’s Friend.” “Juvenile Papers for Southern Children.” The Charleston Daily Courier [Charleston, South Carolina] 14 Feb 1861; p. 2.

• “Juvenile Paper.” The Charleston Daily Courier [Charleston, South Carolina] 1 March 1861; p. 1.

• Claude. “Charleston Correspondence.” The Lancaster News [Lancaster, South Carolina] 6 March 1861; p. 2.

• advertisement: “Wanted, A Young Gentleman.” The Charleston Daily Courier [Charleston, South Carolina] 9 March 1861; p. 2.

• advertisement. Charleston Mercury [Charleston, South Carolina] 25 April 1861; p. 3.

• “The Portfolio.” Charleston Mercury [Charleston, South Carolina] 4 May 1861; p. 4.

• “The Portfolio.” Yorkville Enquirer [York, South Carolina] 17 May 1861; p. 4.

• “The Portfolio.” Daily Constitutionalist [Augusta, Georgia] 23 May 1861; p. 3.

• notice. Augusta Chronicle [Augusta, Georgia] 8 June 1861; p. 3.

• notice. The Daily Picayune [New Orleans, Louisiana] 11 June 1861; p. 1.

• “The Portfolio.” The Lancaster News [Lancaster, South Carolina] 12 June 1861; p. 2.

• “The Portfolio.” Yorkville Enquirer [York, South Carolina] 13 June 1861; p. 2.

• advertisement. Macon Daily Telegraph [Macon, Georgia] 19 June 1861; p. 1.

• Mrs. C. Ladd. “Beauregard—We Are Free.” The Lancaster News [Lancaster, South Carolina] 19 June 1861; p. 1.

• “The Portfolio.” The Macon Daily Telegraph [Macon, Georgia] 21 June 1861; p. 1.

• “The Portfolio.” Keowee Courier [Pickens, South Carolina] 22 June 1861; p. 2.

• “Papers for the South.” The Charleston Daily Courier [Charleston, South Carolina] 29 June 1861; p. 1.

• “From Charleston.” The South 3 July 1861; p. 2.

• “The Portfolio.” The Daily True Delta [New Orleans, Louisiana] 7 July 1861; p. 1.

• “Periodical Agency.” Daily Constitutionalist [Augusta, Georgia] 17 July 1861; p. 3.

• “Exchanges: The Portfolio.” Keowee Courier [Pickens, South Carolina] 20 July 1861; p. 2.

• “The Portfolio.” Daily Constitutionalist [13 Aug 1861]; p. 3.

• “The Portfolio.” The Lancaster News [Lancaster, South Carolina] 14 Aug 1861; p. 2.

• notice to subscribers. Charleston Mercury [Charleston, South Carolina] 15 Oct 1861; p. 3.

• advertisement. The People’s Press [Salem, North Carolina] 13 Dec 1861; p. 4.

• William Stanley Hoole. A Check-list and Finding-list of Charleston Periodicals, 1732-1864. Durham, North Carolina: Duke University Press, 1936; pp. 65-66.

• Sarah Law Kennerly. “Confederate Juvenile Imprints: Children’s Books and Periodicals Published in the Confederate States of America, 1861-1865.” PhD diss. University of Michigan, 1956.

Young People’s Helper (also Young People’s Helper and Temperance Visitor) ; 1862-April 1872

cover/masthead: 1872

published: Rockland, Maine: Z. Pope Vose, 1870.

• Portland, Maine: Z. Pope Vose, 1871.

• Portland, Maine: Rich & Vose, 1872; publisher at 74 Middle St..

frequency: monthly; 1 vol/ year

description:

• 1862-1869: 8 pp.

• 1870-1871: 16 pp.; page size, 11.75″ h; price, 50¢/ year

• 1872: 32 pp.; page size untrimmed, 8″ h x 5.75″ w; price, $1 /year in advance; postage, 12¢/ year

• Circulation: 1872, 6,500

relevant quotes:

• Advertisements in 1870 promised a wide variety of material: “Stories, music, poetry, dialogues, puzzles, etc., in every number.” [advertisement. Herald of Health]

• In Jan 1872, the Helper had a new format: “We present to our readers the first number of the Helper in its new and improved magazine form, and trust that it will commend itself to their approbation and elicit their hearty support. … As a home magazine for boys and girls we hope it will universally please the young people, and obtain the approbation of their elders. As a school magazine we hope it will commend itself to the approval and support of both teachers and pupils.” [10 (Jan 1872); p. 30]

• A description of the Helper’s contents: The Young People’s Helper “is a pleasant little monthly, containing a wealth of instructive and entertaining reading matter, neatly and artistically arranged, printed and gotten up, well calculated to arrest the attention of the young, excite in them a literary taste, and aid them in their school and home studies. It has an elocutionary department with illustrations showing positions, gestures &c., appropriate for certain sentiments contained in pieces given. It also contains one page of music, a beautiful Holiday song, by Prof. S. K. [Wh]iting, who is the musical editor.” [“Young People’s Helper” Wyandotte Gazette]

• Prospective agents for the Helper were promised much: “More Money can be made canvassing for the ‘Young People’s Helper,’ a dollar magazine for young folks, than with any other enterprise in the country. A magnificent Prang Chromo given to every subscriber. Boys and girls do as well as men and women.” [advertisement for agents]

• The announcement of the Helper’s demise appeared in several newspapers: “The Schoolday Visitor Magazine, published by J. W. Daughaday & Co., Philadelphia, comes to our table for May, we think with a richer feast for its readers than ever, and we notice in its publishers’ announcements, that they have just purchased and consolidated into it, two other juvenile periodicals, the Youth’s Temperance Visitor and the Young People’s Helper. We wish the editors and publishers of this charming magazine all the success they can have, for they well merit it, and we advise our young friends to take it.” [“Three in One”] The Schoolday Visitor offered its new subscribers a discount for back issues: “We will send to all our ‘Helper’ and ‘Temperance Visitor’ friends the four back numbers of our Magazine from January to April for Twenty-five cents. Send for them and have the full and complete volume for 1872 at the end of the year.” [“Twenty Five Cents.” Schoolday Visitor Magazine 16 (Aug 1872); p. 224]

absorbed by:

The Monthly School Visitor; Clark’s School Visitor; Our Schoolday Visitor; The Schoolday Visitor Magazine; The Schoolday Magazine (1 April 1857-15 April 1875)

source of information: Jan 1872 issue; notices, etc., below; AAS catalog

available: AASHistPer, series 5

• A story from the magazine was reprinted in the Maine Farmer in 1872. [“Harry’s New Leaf.” Maine Farmer 40 (6 April 1872); p. 4.

bibliography:

• The Young People’s Helper. Northumberland County Democrat [Sunbury, Pennsylvania] 22 July 1870; p. 3.

• advertisement. Manhattan Nationalist [Manhattan, Kansas] 16 Sept 1870; p. 4.

• advertisement. Herald of Health. 17 (April 1871); p. 189.

• The Peninsular Herald. The Poultney Journal [Poultney, Vermont] 15 April 1871; p. 6.

• “5 Cents.” The Watertown News [Watertown, Wisconsin] 19 April 1871; p. 4.

Geo. P. Rowell & Co.’s American Newspaper Directory. New York: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1872; p. 68. [archive.org]

• Edwin Sprague and W. H. Twombly. “The Press of Knox County.” In History of the Press of Maine, ed. Joseph Griffin. Brunswick: 1872; p. 195. [archive.org]

• “Young People’s Helper.” Wyandotte Gazette [Kansas City, Kansas] 4 Jan 1872; p. 2.

• advertisement for agents. The Sunbury Gazette, and Northumberland County Republican [Sunbury, Pennsylvania] 20 Jan 1872; p. 2.

• “Three in One.” The Athens Gleaner [Athens, Pennsylvania] 2 May 1872; p. 2. Also, Sterling Standard [Sterling, Illinois] 2 May 1872; p. 1.

The Child’s World ; 1862-1880 • Youth’s World ; Jan 1881-after 1884

cover/masthead: 1864 | 1865 | 1866 | Jan 1867-April 1868 | Sept 1868-Feb 1869, 1871

edited by: 1868-1878, Richard Newton • 1879-1884, Edwin W. Rice

published: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania: American Sunday School Union; publisher at 1122 Chestnut St. • New York, New York: American Sunday-School Union; publisher at 599 Broadway, 1864-1869; publisher at 10 Bible House, Astor Place, 1871.

frequency: monthly & semimonthly editions; 1 vol/ year

description: 1864-1871: 8 pp.; page size, 13″ h x 9.5″ w. Prices: monthly ed., 1 copy, 12¢/ year; 10 copies, $1.20/ year; 20 copies, $2.40/ year; 50 copies, $6/ year; 75 copies, $9/ year; 100 copies, $12/ year. Semimonthly ed., 1 copy, 24¢/ year; 10 copies, $2.40/ year; 20 copies, $4.80/ year; 50 copies, $12/ year; 75 copies, $18/ year; 100 copies, $24/ year

• Circulation: 1869 & 1870, 300,000

• Religious focus

• Perhaps because the World was a continuation of the Sunday-School Banner and The Youth’s Sunday-School Gazette (11 Jan 1843-1861), it was treated as a new series, with both the old and new volume numbers printed on the masthead.

• Each issue of the semimonthly edition is dated only with month and year; thus, vol 23 #17 and vol 23 #18 are both dated Sept 1866.

• Children attending a meeting organized by the Children’s Aid Society received “small pictorial papers, called the Child’s World.” [“Children’s Aid Society”]

• In 1867, the masthead was changed: “On the first of the year 1867, we shall present the readers of THE CHILD’S WORLD with a very attractive sheet. We have had a new head engraved on purpose for it, and a new fount [sic] of type will be used for printing it ….” [23 #14 (Dec 1866): 3]

relevant quote: At the end of 1864, the editor pointed out, “It is now twenty-two years since we began to publish a paper for children and youth. Since that time a great many such papers have been started, and some of them continue to this day. We are very glad that so many people are at work to please the taste and improve the minds of our young friends. Those who read the early volumes of our paper, are now men and women grown up, with children of their own to care for ….” [21 #24 (Dec 1864); p. 4]

continues: Youth’s Penny Gazette • The Youth’s Sunday-School Gazette (also The Youth’s Sunday School Gazette) (11 Jan 1843-1861) • Sunday-School Banner (Jan 1859-Dec 1861)

source of information: 1864-1869, 1871, scattered issues in bound vol; AAS catalog; OCLC; notices, etc., below

available: AASHistPer, series 4 & 5

bibliography:

• advertisement. The Danville Quarterly Review 1 (Dec 1861); p. 3.

• “Holiday Presents, &c.” Poughkeepsie Eagle-News [Poughkeepsie, New York] 5 Dec 1861; p. 3.

• “The Child’s World.” The Buffalo Commercial [Buffalo, New York] 21 Dec 1861; p. 3.

• “Sunday School Periodicals.” The Daily Green Mountain Freeman [Montpelier, Vermont] 2 Jan 1862; p. 2.

• advertisement. The Independent 14 (2 Jan 1862); p. 5.

• notice. Vermont Chronicle [Bellows Falls, Vermont] 7 Jan 1862; p. 2.

• “Children’s Aid Society—Boys’ and Girls’ Meeting.” The New York Times [New York, New York] 20 Jan 1862; p. 5.

• “The Ladies City Mission.” Chicago Tribune [Chicago, Illinois] 15 July 1862; p. 4.

• advertisement. New York Evangelist 33 (8 Jan 1863); p. 5.

• Franklin B. Hough. “Newspapers and Other Periodicals,” in Census of the State of New York, for 1865. Albany, New York: Charles Van Benthuysen & Sons, 1867; pp. 590-591.

• advertisement. Reformed Church Messenger 33 (15 Jan 1868); p. 5.

• “The Great Pilot.” Vermont Christian Messenger [Montpelier, Vermont] 18 June 1868; p. 2.

• “New Publications.” The Philadelphia Inquirer [Philadelphia, Pennsylvania] 18 Dec 1868; p. 8.

Geo. P. Rowell & Co’s American Newspaper Directory. New York: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1869; pp. 75, 99. [archive.org]

• advertisement. Reformed Church Messenger 34 (7 Jan 1869); p. 8.

• advertisement. American Literary Gazette and publishers’s Circular 14 (1 Jan 1870); p. 120.

The Men Who Advertise. New York: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1870; p. 735. [google books]

• advertisement. American Literary Gazette and Publishers’s Circular 16 (2 Jan 1871); p. 83.

Geo. P. Rowell & Co.’s American Newspaper Directory. New York: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1872; p. 160. [archive.org]

• “National Sunday-School Periodicals.” The Philadelphia Inquirer [Philadelphia, Pennsylvania] 4 Jan 1872; p. 5.

• advertisement. American Literary Gazette and Publishers’s Circular 18 (15 Jan 1872); p. 109.

• “Uniform Lessons.” The Philadelphia Inquirer [Philadelphia, Pennsylvania] 23 March 1872; p. 5.

• advertisement. Christian Union 20 (17 Dec 1879); p. 539.

• J. Thomas Scharf and Thompson Westcott. History of Philadelphia, 1609-1884. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania: L. H. Everts & Co., 1884; vol 3, p. 2014. [google books]

• Barbara Snedeker Bates. “Denominational Periodicals: The Invisible Literature.” Phaedrus 7 (Spring/Summer 1980); pp. 13-18.

Monthly Voice ; Jan 1862-Aug 1863, Dec 1863-Jan 1864, April 1864

cover/masthead: Jan 1863, April 1864 | Dec 1863

edited by: M. L. Wilson

published: Newark, Ohio: General Church of the New Jerusalem

frequency: monthly

description: 1863, 8 pp. 1864, 4 pp. • Price, 25¢/ year

• Religious focus: New Church

relevant quotes:

• About the gap between Aug and Dec 1863: “We prefer dating this number of the ‘Voice’ for the coming month. We thereby omit three months.—This will make no difference with the subscribers, as the subscriptions will all follow the numbers, and extend three months longer. The Voice will still be printed. We believe it will hereafter be punctual, and we shall do all we can to make it interesting, and desirable to all.” [“Our Paper.” 2 (Dec 1863): 6]

• About the end: “We beg pardon for the delay, or non-appearance of our little paper for the past two months, and at the same time express our regrets that circumstances compel us in this number to take leave of our patrons. In doing this, we take pleasure in acknowledging the many kind favors rendered us by those who like ourself have felt the necessity of the publication of a cheap little paper, advocating the principal of the New Church. … Our love for these truths, is by no means lessened, nor is our belief in the usefulness of such a publication less strong. But assured that we have failed in doing justice to the few patrons we have had, and the little hope of ability to do better in future, owing to pressure of our present office duties, we bid you all adieu. To our friends in ‘Canada West,’ Washington City, Buffalo, N. Y. Cincinnati, O. Detroit, Mich. Urbana, O. and all others who have taken an interest in our paper, we tender our sincere thanks. All those to whom we are indebted to the amount of 10cts and over, will receive the same by mail. We shall also use our efforts t[o] induce some one to continue the publication of a New church Child’s Paper who can do so. We still think it can be supported should we find any one who will undertake it we will send names on our books.” [“Our Farewell.” 2 (April 1864): 4]

source of information: AASHistPer

available: AASHistPer, series 4

The Children’s Friend ; Aug 1862-1 Feb 1865, 1866-June 1915

cover/masthead: 1867-1868

edited by: 1863, William Brown • 1867-1872, 1896, E. T. Baird

• OCLC lists J. K. Hazen

published: Richmond, Virginia: Presbyterian Committee on Publication, 1862-1878; publisher 1101 Main St., 1867-1868.

• Richmond, Virginia: Presbyterian Committe on Publication, in conjunction with the Reformed Church, 1878-1915.

frequency: 1862, monthly • 1 Jan 1864-, semimonthly • 1867-1872, semimonthly & monthly

description: 4 pp.; folio

• 1862: price, 1 copy, 30¢/ year; multiple copies, each 25¢/ year; 30¢/ year, “in packages” • circulation for first issue: 2,274

• 1864: prices, 1 copy, 50¢/ year; 20 copies, 40¢/ year

• 1866: price, 25¢/ six months

• 1867: page size, 14.5″ h x 10.5″ w; price, 30¢/ year, “in packages” • 1868: page size, 14.5″ h x 10.5″ w; price: 1 copy, semimonthly, 50¢/year; monthly, 25¢/ year. 8 copies, semimonthly, $2/ year; monthly, $1/ year. Price was lowered in 1867

• 1867-1868: “An Evangelical Sabbath School Journal”

• 1869-1872: page size, size 20″ h x 15″ w. Prices: semimonthly, 50¢, monthly, 25¢

• Circulation, 1862, 2,274; 1866, 9,000; 1870, 23,500

• In 1868, subscriptions to the Friend totaled $1,663

• Vol 1-2 (Aug 1862-1864); new series vol 1-51 (1866-June 1915)

• Religious focus: 1862-1865, Presbyterian & Methodist

relevant information: The Friend apparently was a substitute for the Sabbath School Visitor, inaccessible in 1862 because it was published in Philadelphia. [Stroupe]

relevant quotes:

• The Friend’s beginnings were complicated: “Through the kindness of a friend, we have received a copy of the ‘Minutes of the General Assembly of the Presbyterian Church in the Confederate States of America, A. D. 1862,’ printed at Augusta, Georgia, which Assembly, it is stated in the first day’s minute, ‘in view of the presence of the conflicting armies in the near vicinity of the city of Memphis, and the consequent danger and difficulty of assembling at that place, met, … in the Presbyterian Church in the city of Montgomery …. The Committee of Publication reported that they had not, for some time past, secured the attendance of a quorum, three of the members residing in Richmond, having been called into the army. Arrangements had been made with the Publishing House of the Methodist Episcopal Church, in Nashville, to publish a Sabbath school paper for their use; but this plan was frustrated, say the Committee ‘by the political misfortune befalling that city.’ They proposed to issue in May a children’s paper, from Richmond, Virginia, to be called the Children’s Friend, lamenting, however, that only 2,274 copies have been subscribed for. The entire receipts of the Committee had been $5,132.” [“The Southern (O. S.) Assembly”]

• Originaly published as a Presbyterian periodical, it was circulated in the Methodist community as well: “This publication … has attained a large circulation among the Presbyterian and Methodist Churches of the State [of Virginia] and South generally, and also in some places at the North.” [“Children’s Friend.” Richmond Dispatch 29 March 1866] In 1866, it became a Methodist publication: “The managers of the Methodist Sunday School Society of Richmond, Va., have made arrangements for supplying their schools with the ‘Children’s Friend,’ a paper formerly published by the Presbyterians.” [“Religious Intelligence”] However, the Friend continued to be considered a Presbyterian publication.

absorbed by: Onward

source of information: Dec 1867-1868 scattered issues; Kennerly; Kelly; OCLC; NUC; Rowell; Stroupe

available: AASHistPer, series 5

bibliography:

• “The Children’s Friend.” The Semi-Weekly State Journal [Raleigh, North Carolina] 8 Oct 1862; p. 1.

• “The Southern (O. S.) Assembly.” New York Evangelist 32 (20 Nov 1862); p. 6.

• “The Children’s Friend.” The Confederate [Raleigh, North Carolina] 17 Feb 1864; p. 1.

• “Religious Intelligence.” Fall River Daily Evening News [Fall River, Massachusetts] 3 Feb 1866; p. 2.

• “Children’s Friend.” Richmond Dispatch [Richmond, Virginia] 29 March 1866; p. 1.

• “Presbyterian Publication Committee.” Richmond Dispatch [Richmond, Virginia] 20 July 1866; p. 1.

• “The General Assembly of the Presbyterian Church of the United States.” Daily Dispatch [Richmond, Virginia] 25 May 1868; p. 1.

Geo. P. Rowell & Co’s American Newspaper Directory. New York: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1869; p. 111. [archive.org]

The Men Who Advertise. New York: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1870; p. 750. [google books]

Geo. P. Rowell & Co.’s American Newspaper Directory. New York: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1872; p. 181. [archive.org]

• Sarah Law Kennerly. “Confederate Juvenile Imprints: Children’s Books and Periodicals Published in the Confederate States of America, 1861-1865.” PhD diss. University of Michigan, 1956.

• Henry Smith Stroupe. The Religious Press in the South Atlantic States, 1802-1865. Durham, North Carolina: Duke University Press, 1956; p. 55.

Children’s Periodicals of the United States, ed. R. Gordon Kelly. Westport, Connecticut & London, England: Greenwood Press, 1984.

• Daniel W. Stowell. Rebuilding Zion: The Religious Reconstruction of the South, 1863-1877. New York: Oxford University Press, 1998; p. 115-116, 119.

• Michael T. Bernath. Confederate Minds: The Struggle for Intellectual Independence in the Civil War South. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2010; p. 334.

The Child’s Index ; Sept 1862, Jan 1863-Dec 1865 • Child’s Delight ; Jan 1866-1869

edited by: Samuel Boykin

published: Macon, Georgia: Samuel Boykin, Jan 1863-April 1865. Macon, Georgia: N.p., 1866.

frequency: 1862-1865, monthly • 1869, monthly & semimonthly

description:

• 1862-1868: 4 pp.; newspaper format

• 1869-1870: monthly, 8 pp.; semimonthly, 4 pp. The Delight was mailed to Sunday schools monthly, “two papers printed together,” to be pulled apart and distributed semimonthly.

• Prices: 1862: 1 copy, 50¢/ year. March-Dec 1863: 1 copy, $1/ year; 4 or more copies, 50¢ each/ year. Jan 1864: 1 copy, $1/ six months; 1 copy, $2/ year; 2-4 copies, $2 each/ year; 5 or more copies, $1 each/ year. early 1866, $1/ year; Nov 1866-1867, 50¢/ year

• Circulation: March 1863, 4,000-5,000. Nov 1863, 11,000 • May 1864, 12,000. Dec 1864, 15,000 [Bernath 195] July 1867, 6,000. Aug 1868, 14,000

• Sept 1862 issue is specimen issue

• Aug 1864 issue misnumbered Vol 2 #7

• The first issue as The Child’s Delight is numbered vol 1 #1.

• Religious focus: Baptist. In 1866, however, the paper was advertised as nondenominational.

relevant quotes:

• The Index had a Baptist focus: “This handsome and attractive paper for children is published in Macon, Ga., by S. Boykin, the Editor of the Christian Index. It is denominational in character, and at the same time well calculated to insruct children in regard to gospel truth, home duty and a Christian life. … Every Baptist family in the South containing children should subscribe for it.” The description is followed by a list of Baptist ministers recommending the Index to “the Baptists of the Confederacy, as an instructive and entertaining paper for children.” [advertisement. South Western Baptist 19 March 1863]

• Difficulties during the Civil War affected the price, which in 1862 was 50¢ a year for one copy. In early 1863, the price of one copy was raised to $1: “I am determined to keep the paper going, and on good white paper; but must increase the price or lose money. When the war ceases I will reduce the price.” [“Child’s Index.” South Western Baptist 19 March 1863] 1864 saw another jump, to $2 a year for one copy.

• While the paper began life as a Baptist-focused publication, in 1866 it was advertised as nondenominational: “It will advocate the creeds and doctrines of no particular denomination, but will seek to inculcate all the commonly received truths of evangelical religion.” [Georgia Weekly Telegraph 12 Feb 1866] The editor explained the change: “The editor of the Child’s Delight, after mature reflection, determined to issue a child’s paper for children, free from denominational bias, his aim being to reach and benefit the largest possible number of infant minds.” [in “A Change in ‘The Delight’ ”]

• The Feb 1866 issue was late: “Delay has been caused by the non-arrival of material, paper and type—now on the way. As soon as it comes, the paper will be issued in handsome style. It will contain more matter than Robert Merry’s Museum, at a less price, and there will be a greater variety and more pictures. The Child’s Delight is a Southern paper for Southern children—a Sunday school paper—a family paper—a paper that is sure to become a favorite, and afford what its name imports—delight to the children.” [Macon Daily Telegraph 21 Jan 1866]

• Regionalism was still a selling point after the Civil War: “[The Child’s Delight] is got up in a style quite equal to the best of similar periodicals published in the North, and we need not say that it is free from the objections that apply to nearly all such.” [Louisville Daily Courier 18 May 1866]

• The Jan 1867 issue announced that the formerly nondenominational Child’s Delight would thereafter be strictly Baptist: “In the last number of this excellent paper, the Editor announces that its character will be changed. Hitherto it has been free from denominational peculiarities, but hereafter it will be a Baptist paper. We are glad to note the change and take pleasure in again commending the Delight to our readers.” [“Our Exchanges”] The change came because an anticipated increase in subscribers failed to materialize: “We have scrupulously abstained from publishing aught of a denominational bias; we have made every reasonable effort to extend its circulation, and especially to introduce it into the Sabbath Schools of the churches. But the experiment has proved a failure. Pedo-baptist Sabbath Schools will not take the paper, and we have not fifty subscribers who are not Baptists. And, as it is thus true that we must look to the Baptists alone for the support of the Delight, it is but right and proper that the paper should be a Baptist paper. In its present form, many Baptists will not subscribe, while if the paper advocates Baptist principles they will do so. Therefore, as the present circulation does not justify the expense of publication, and as we are not accomplishing that amount of good we anticipated, because we are not reaching the number of infant minds we had hoped to reach, we have resolved to abandon our neutral position and issue a paper in accordance with our own religious principles. We can offend only a very small number by this decision, because very few outside of the Baptist ranks take the paper. But if any should be offended and desire their paper stopped, we will refund the amount due them. This course has been forced upon us by the utter indifference of other denominations to the paper, thus defeating the object we had in view, which was to reach the greatest number of readers, and by that means do the greatest amount of good.” [“A Change in ‘The Delight’ ”]

• In 1869, the Biblical Recorder suggested that Kind Words be ‘turned over to [Boykin], and let him publish it.” [27 Jan 1869]

interesting information: The July 1863 issue contains a short story by 15-year-old Joel Chandler Harris. [Flanders; p. 133]

absorbed by: Kind Words for the Sunday School Children • Kind Words, the Child’s Delight (Jan 1866-29 Sept 1929)

source of information: notices, etc., below; OCLC

available:

• “I am the Door” was reprinted in the New York Observer and Chronicle [47 (25 Feb 1869); p. 60] and then in Youth’s Companion [42 (15 April 1869); p. 118]

• excerpts of Index in Lessons of War: The Civil War in Children’s Magazines, ed. James Marten. Wilmington, Delaware: Scholarly Resources, 1998.

bibliography:

• “The Child’s Index.” Macon Daily Telegraph [Macon, Georgia] 27 Sept 1862; p. 2.

• “The Child’s Index.” Daily Constitutionalist [Augusta, Georgia] 1 Oct 1862; p. 3.

• “Child’s Index.” The Chattanooga Daily Rebel [Chattanooga, Tennessee] 3 Oct 1862; p. 2.

• “The Child’s Index.” South Western Baptist [Marion, Alabama] 23 Oct 1862; p. 2.

• “The Child’s Index.” Daily Constitutionalist [Augusta, Georgia] 21 Dec 1862; p. 3.

• “The Child’s Index.” The Biblical Recorder [Raleigh, North Carolina] 18 Feb 1863; p. 2.

• advertisement. South Western Baptist [Marion, Alabama] 19 March 1863; p. 3.

• “Child’s Index.” South Western Baptist [Marion, Alabama] 19 March 1863; p. 2.

• “Child’s Index.” The Biblical Recorder [Raleigh, North Carolina] 20 May 1863; p. 2.

• advertisement. South Western Baptist [Marion, Alabama] 28 Jan 1864; p. 2.

• advertisement. The Biblical Recorder [Raleigh, North Carolina] 6 Feb 1864; p. 3.

• “The Child’s Index.” Christian Index, May 20, 1864; p. 2.

• advertisement for The Christian Index. The Daily Phoenix [Columbia, South Carolina] 8 Aug 1865; p. 4. Also, 11 Aug 1865; p. 1.

• advertisement for The Christian Index. Advertiser and Register [Mobile, Alabama] 13 Sept 1865; p. 2.

• “Our Book Table: The Child’s Delight.” The Field and Fireside [Raleigh, North Carolina] 23 Dec 1865; p. 4.

• “The ‘Child’s Delight’.” Georgia Weekly Telegraph [Macon, Georgia] 12 Feb 1866; p. 5.

• “The Child’s Delight.” The Daily Phoenix [Columbia, South Carolina] 23 Feb 1866; p. 2.

• “The Child’s Delight.” Georgia Weekly Telegraph [Macon, Georgia] 5 March 1866; p. 4.

• “The Child’s Delight.” Georgia Weekly Telegraph [Macon, Georgia] 10 March 1866; p. 2.

• “The Child’s Delight.” Georgia Weekly Telegraph [Macon, Georgia] 12 March 1866; p. 1. Also, 27 May 1866; p. 2.

• The Child’s Delight. The Charleston Daily News [Charleston, South Carolina] 14 March 1866; p. 5.

• The Child’s Delight. The Louisville Daily Courier [Louisville, Kentucky] 18 May 1866; p. 1.

• “The Child’s Delight.” Southern Cultivator 24 (July 1866); p. 167.

• “The Child’s Delight.” Georgia Weekly Telegraph [Macon, Georgia] 4 July 1866; p. 2.

• “The Child’s Delight.” Georgia Weekly Telegraph [Macon, Georgia] 28 Oct 1866; p. 2. Also, 29 Oct 1866; p. 4.

• “The Child’s Delight.” Georgia Weekly Telegraph [Macon, Georgia] 24 Dec 1866; p. 2.

• advertisement. The Biblical Recorder [Raleigh, North Carolina] 9 Jan 1867; p. 4.

• “The Child’s Delight.” Daily Constitutionalist [Augusta, Georgia] 20 Jan 1867; p. 3.

• advertisement. The Biblical Recorder [Raleigh, North Carolina] 20 Feb 1867; p. 3.

• “Our Exchanges: The Child’s Delight.” The Biblical Recorder [Raleigh, North Carolina] 13 Feb 1867; p. 2.

• “A Change in ‘The Delight.’ ” The Tennessee Baptist [Memphis, Tennessee] 4 May 1867; p. 3.

• advertisement. The Biblical Recorder [Raleigh, North Carolina] 26 June 1867; p. 3.

• “The Child’s Delight.” Georgia Weekly Telegraph [Macon, Georgia] 5 July 1867; p. 1.

• “Child’s Delight.” Southern Cultivator 25 (Oct 1867); p. 329.

• advertisement. The Tennessee Baptist [Memphis, Tennessee] 2 Nov 1867; p. 8.

• “Child’s Delight.” Georgia Weekly Telegraph [Macon, Georgia] 8 Nov 1867; p. 4.

• “The Child’s Delight.” Georgia Weekly Telegraph [Macon, Georgia] 29 Nov 1867; p. 4.

• “To the Readers of ‘The Baptist’ ” The Tennessee Baptist [Memphis, Tennessee] 15 Feb 1868; p. 5.

• “Child’s Delight.” The Tennessee Baptist [Memphis, Tennessee] 21 March 1868; p. 5.

• “The Child’s Delight.” The Biblical Recorder 5 Aug 1868; p. 2.

• “Proposal: A Weekly Delight.” The Tennessee Baptist [Memphis, Tennessee] 12 Sept 1868; p. 3. Also, The Biblical Recorder [Raleigh, North Carolina] 30 Sept 1868; p. 3.

• “Letterbox”: J. B. Appleton. The Tennessee Baptist [Memphis, Tennessee] 3 Oct 1868; p. 5.

• “The Child’s Delight.” The Biblical Recorder [Raleigh, North Carolina] 27 Jan 1869; p. 4.

• advertisement. The Biblical Recorder [Raleigh, North carolina] 27 Jan 1869; p. 3.

• advertisement. The Biblical Recorder [Raleigh, North carolina] 14 April 1869; p. 3.

• “Editorial Brevities: S. S. B.” The Tennessee Baptist [Memphis, Tennessee] 19 Feb 1870; p. 4.

• Thomas C. Teasdale. “Sunday-School Board.” Tennessee Baptist [Memphis, Tennessee] 26 March 1870; p. 6.

• advertisement. The Tennessee Baptist [Memphis, Tennessee] 26 March 1870; p. 6.

• Bertram Holland Flanders. Early Georgia Magazines. Athens, Georgia: University of Georgia Press, 1944; p. 133.

• Sarah Law Kennerly. “Confederate Juvenile Imprints: Children’s Books and Periodicals Published in the Confederate States of America, 1861-1865.” PhD diss. University of Michigan, 1956.

• James Marten. The Children’s Civil War. Chapel Hill: The University of North Carolina Press, 1998; pp. 51.

Lessons of War: The Civil War in Children’s Magazines, ed. James Marten. Wilmington, Delaware: Scholarly Resources, 1998.

• Daniel W. Stowell. Rebuilding Zion: The Religious Reconstruction of the South, 1863-1877. New York: Oxford University Press, 1998; p. 115-116, 119-120.

• Michael T. Bernath. Confederate Minds: The Struggle for Intellectual Independence in the Civil War South. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2010; pp. 195-198, 334.

Little American ; 1 Oct 1862-1864

cover/masthead: 1862-1863

edited by: Susan Warner; Anna Warner

published: Hudson, New York: George W. Frary, 1 Oct 1862-. Also, Rhinecliff, New York: George W. Frary, 1862. West Point, New York: George W. Frary, 1863.

frequency: semimonthly

description: 8 pp.; price, $1.50/ year

• No issues for 15 July 1864 or 1 Aug 1864

• 1865 issues were to be monthly; 12 pp.

• 22 issues total

relevant information: The table of contents of the 15 April 1864 (vol 2 #12) issue was printed in the New-York Daily Tribune [23 April 1864; p. 2].

relevant quotes:

• The editors were well-known writers who had fallen on hard times: “Most of our readers have pleasant associations connected with the Warner sisters, Susan and Anna, who have been prolific and acceptable writers for twelve years past. The elder of the two first acquired reputation and competence as the author of the ‘Wide, Wide World,’ a religious romance of which thirty-five thousand copies have been sold in the United States, besides foreign editions in English and French. The second, Anna, published a novel with the tempting title of ‘Dollars and Cents,’ quite as agreeable to mature minds as the earlier novel of her sister. Each has produced many subsequent works, besides their joint production entitled ‘Say and Seal.’ It has been customary to cite these ladies as examples of literary success; unhappily, the recent failure of a publisher has swept away the savings of prosperous years, and thrown them back upon their productive ability and the reputation they have acquired. They are now engaged in editing the Little American, a semi-monthly sheet devoted to juvenile miscellany, well printed in a convenient form for binding at the close of the year. The number before us is a good one, varied, lively and instructive in contents; and we have only to announce the enterprise to ensure for it the warm sympathy of thousands of kindly friends.” [Springfield Republican]

• In 1864, the editors announced, “We shall not go on unless we have what we think encouragement to do so.” [2 (1 Nov 1864); p. 164; in Lyon, p. 238]

source of information: AAS catalog; OCLC; Lyon

available: AASHistPer, series 4

• excerpt in Lessons of War: The Civil War in Children’s Magazines, ed. James Marten. Wilmington, Delaware: Scholarly Resources, 1998.

bibliography:

• “Sympathy and Subscription.” Springfield Weekly Republican [Springfield, Massachusetts] 4 April 1863; p. 7.

• advertisement. New-York Daily Tribune [New York, New York] 23 April 1864; p. 2.

• notice. New-York Daily Tribune [New York, New York] 30 April 1864; p. 2.

• Betty Longenecker Lyon. “A History of Children’s Secular Magazines Published in the United States from 1789-1899.” PhD diss. Johns Hopkins, 1942; pp. 149, 236-238.

Lessons of War: The Civil War in Children’s Magazines, ed. James Marten. Wilmington, Delaware: Scholarly Resources, 1998.

Der Lammerhirt ; 1863-

See Der Lämmer-Hirte

The Sabbath School Gem ; 1863-1864, 1869-1873

edited by: James E. N. Backus & Lucy A. Backus

published: DeRuyter, New York: James E. N. Backus, 1863-1864. Port Leyden, New York: James E. N. Backus, 1869. Scott, New York: James E. N. Backus, 1870. Albion, Wisconsin: James E. N. Backus, 1871-1873.

frequency: 1869, monthly • 1870-1873, semimonthly

description: 1869: 4 pp.; page size 24″ h x 17″ w; price, 30¢/ year

• 1870: 4 pp.; page size 24″ h x 16″ w; price, 50¢/ year

• 1871-1873: 4 pp.; page size 22″ h x 16″ w; price, 50¢/ year

• Circulation: 1871, 1,296; 1872, 1,296

• Religious focus: Seventh Day Baptist

relevant quotes: One advertisement declared that the Gem was “for Little Folks who Desire to be Good Folks.” [Rowell 1873; p. 370]

•Lucy Backus remembered the stresses of producing the paper: “I can surely sympathize with you in your undertaking, as I myself, in my younger days, assisted my husband in preparing copy for the Sabbath School Gem, a child’s paper for the Sabbath Schools of our denomination, and I know it is not always a pleasant task, for the weeks come around so regularly and the copy must be ready on time for the printer. I also know that it is a work of love for those who desire to do something for the dear Master.” [Backus]

source of information: Rowell; Hammond; Backus

bibliography:

Geo. P. Rowell & Co’s American Newspaper Directory. New York: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1869; p. 80; copy online at UNT Digital Libraries

The Men Who Advertise. New York: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1870; p. 711. [google books]

Geo. P. Rowell & Co’s American Newspaper Directory. New York: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1871; p. 158; copy online at UNT Digital Libraries

• Mrs. L. M. Hammond. History of Madison County, State of New York. Syracuse, New York: Truair, Smith & Co., 1872; p. 278. [archive.org]

Geo. P. Rowell & Co.’s American Newspaper Directory. New York: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1872; p. 183. [archive.org]

Geo. P. Rowell & Co’s American Newspaper Directory. New York: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1873; p. 370. [archive.org]

Seventh Day Baptists in Europe and America. Plainfield, New Jersey: seventh Day Baptist General Conference, 1910; vol 1, p. 276. [google books]

• Letter from Lucy A. Backus. The Sabbath School Recorder 70 (6 March 1911): 307. [google books]

Sabbath School Star ; Feb 1863-after 1870

edited by: George L. Babington, 1870

published: St. Louis, Missouri: P. M. Pinckard, 1863-1869; publisher at 80 Pine (between 5th & 6th). • St. Louis, Missouri: South-western Book and Publishing Company, 1870; publisher at 510 & 512 Washington Ave.

frequency: 1863-1868, monthly; 1869-1870, semimonthly & monthly

description: 4 pp.; page size, 20″ h x 13″ w; prices: 1 copy, 30¢/ year; 100 copies, $24/ year

• Religious focus

relevant quote: A description of the publishing house: “The basement contains the steam power and the mammoth Hoe press, with capacity to print the largest sized sheet. On this press the Christian Advocate is worked. Here are other improved presses for book work, &c. The first floor embraces the general salesrooms, office, &c. the stock of religious and miscellaneous books displayed is very large, the shelves and counters of the double store being loaded on all sides with standard works, and volumes of more recent interest, and with stationery and stationer’s articles of every description.” [“Southwestern Book and Publishing Company”]

source of information: Worldcat; Edwards; Rowell; Tanner

bibliography:

• Richard Edwards, editor. Edwards’ Annual Directory to the … City of St. Louis for 1864. St. Louis, Missouri: Richard Edwards, 1864; pp. 79; copy online at digital.wustl.edu

•Richard Edwards, ed. Edwards’ Annual Directory to the … City of St. Louis for 1865. St. Louis, Missouri: Richard Edwards, 1865; p. 119; copy online at digital.wustl.edu

• Henry Tanner, comp. Directory & Shipper’s Guide of Kansas & Nebraska. Leavenworth City, Kansas: T. A. Holland & Co., 1866; p. 567. [google books]

• Richard Edwards, ed. Edwards’ Annual Directory to the … City of St. Louis for 1866. St. Louis, Missouri: Richard Edwards, 1866; p. 89; copy online at digital.wustl.edu

• Richard Edwards, ed. Edwards’ Annual Directory to the … City of St. Louis for 1867. St. Louis, Missouri: Richard Edwards, 1867; p. 113; copy online at digital.wustl.edu

Edwards’ Annual Directory to the … City of St. Louis for 1868. St. Louis, Missouri: Southern Publishing, 1868; p. 107; copy online at digital.wustl.edu

• Richard Edwards, editor. Edwards’ Annual Directory to the … City of St. Louis for 1869. St. Louis, Mo.: Richard Edwards, 1869; p. 79; copy online at digital.wustl.edu

• advertisement. Colman’s Rural World 22 (13 Feb 1869); p. 111.

Edwards’ Annual Directory to the … City of St. Louis for 1870. St. Louis, Mo.: Southern Publishing, 1870; p. 65; copy online at digital.wustle.edu

The Men Who Advertise. New York: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1870; p. 684. [google books]

• “Southwestern Book and Publishing Company.” Leavenworth Daily Commercial [Leavenworth, Kansas] 29 Sept 1870; p. 4.

• “Books, Magazines and Papers Received.” Advocate of Peace 2 (Oct 1870); p. 296.

The Child’s Casket (also, Children’s Casket) ; March-Sept? 1863

edited by: David Sullins

published: Knoxville, Tennessee: Charles W. Charlton

frequency: March-May, monthly; June-Sept?, semimonthly

• Readers subscribing before June 1863 could receive the Casket monthly after June, or could receive it semimonthly with payment of another 25¢. [Sullins]

• The publisher promised that once there were 4000 subscribers, the Casket would become a weekly paper. The Casket becoming semimonthly was contingent upon it having 2000 subscribers. [Holston Journal 12 March 1863; p. 3]

description: 4 pp.; page size: “of large size, considering the times and terms” [Daily Constitutionalist] Prices: March-May: 1 copy, 75¢/ year; 5+ copies, 50¢/ each. June-Sept?: 1 copy, $1/ year; 5+ copies, 75¢/ each

• First printing, 1000 copies

• Religious focus: Methodist

relevant information:

• Unnamed during the first discussions of having a religious paper for children, the Casket was listed as Children’s Casket on 19 Feb 1863 and as Child’s Casket on 20 Feb 1863.

• First issue was available 12 March 1863

• The Casket ended when the publisher left Knoxville as the town was occupied by Union soldiers on 2 Sept 1863; there may not have been a Sept issue.

• Charlton published the Holston Journal [Knoxville, Tennessee], a Methodist paper for adults.

relevant quotes:

• The Casket evidently was proposed because the Methodist publishing concern in Nashville, Tennessee, was cut off from the rest of the state after Union troops occupied Nashville in 1862: “Our Book concern at Nashville cannot supply the children with books, and the old libraries are worn out and have become insipid,” one observer wrote in 1863. “The children want something new and a paper will supply their wants.” [Holston Journal 20 Feb 1863; p. 3] “Sabbath school books are not to be obtained for our thinly attended schools,” W. H. Bates noted, “and if they were, weekly periodicals are the more effective means of impressing, and moulding the young mind and heart. There seems to be a moral necessity upon us for such publication, in view of the absence of such publication in the Church South. The fields white for the harvest, and the great importance of keeping in operation all the machinery of church organization; that when peace shall once more spread its balmy wing over our land, we shall have all the agencies in motion to check the demoralizing that shall come back upon society.”

• The editor of the Bristol Advocate appears to have agreed: “It is a move in the right direction, and one which we heartily endorse. … And when the Publishing House at Nashville, comes again into our possession, and the Sunday School Visitor is restored to the church and to the country, the proposed paper can easily be discontinued, or its character changed. The mind and heart of the children of the South comprise an interesting and important field for christian labor which should be cultivated with promptness and energy.” [in Holston Journal 12 March 1863; p. 2]

• Charlton was clear that subscribers shouldn’t have high expectations of the paper: “It will be, for the present, a Monthly, containing four pages, which will be sufficiently large, we trust, to satisfy all. More must not be expected while matters continue as they are. We cannot now consent to lower our terms, nor to make the paper of larger dimensions. After we get under way, and find our patronage sufficiently encouraging, we may consent to do both. Our great purpose is to do good. We cannot be a party to the sordid transaction inaugurating this blessed undertaking for the sake of gain. Perish the thought! The world is wide enough in which to exercise our talents for money making without invading the sacred precincts of the church, and when it is our purpose thus to tax our talents, we want it distinctly understood that we expect to try a different theater than that of the church. We are strangely impressed with thought that there is a wide field opening up for usefulness and that we are all required to put forth every energy to promote and advance the interest of our race.” [Holston Journal 19 Feb 1863; p. 3]

• Once the first issue appeared, Charlton again cautioned subscribers about the page size: “Those who may object to its size, must bear in mind that it is yet a mere child, and must grow and become strong. It can’t be a man all at once. It has the bones; you give it the nourishment, and our word for it, you will yet confront the little fellow in more magnificent proportions.” [Holston Journal 12 March 1863; p. 3]

• Advertised as “designed for children, and … issued to meet the wants of Sabbath Schools in the absence of Sunday School libraries.” [advertisement]

continued by: Sunday School Visitor • The Children’s Visitor • The Visitor (Nov 1850-Dec 1854, May 1855-March 1862, 1866-after 1921): In 1866, Charlton was advised by the Committee on Books and Periodicals of the Holston Conference of the Methodist Episcopal Church to “furnish the subscribers to [the Holston Journal] with the Christian Advocate to the value of the amounts due them, and further that he should furnish the Sunday School Visitor as soon as practicable to the subscribers to the Child’s Casket.” [Price p. 422]

source of information: pieces listed below

bibliography:

• “To the Preachers.” Holston Journal [Knoxville, Tennessee] 19 Feb 1863; p. 2.

• “Sunday School Paper.” Holston Journal [Knoxville, Tennessee] 19 Feb 1863; p. 3.

• “The Right Sort of Talk.” Holston Journal [Knoxville, Tennessee] 20 Feb 1863; p. 3.

• W. H. Bates. “Sunday School Paper.” Holston Journal [Knoxville, Tennessee] 5 March 1863; p. 1.

• “To Willie C. Huff.” Holston Journal [Knoxville, Tennessee] 5 March 1863; p. 2.

• “The Child’s Casket.” Holston Journal [Knoxville, Tennessee] 12 March 1863; p. 3.

• “Sunday School Paper. Holston Journal [Knoxville, Tennessee] 12 March 1863; p. 2.

• “Keep It Before the Church.” Holston Journal [Knoxville, Tennessee] 9 April 1863; p. 3.

• “The Sunday School Paper.” Holston Journal [Knoxville, Tennessee] 16 April 1863; p. 2.

• D. Sullins. “The Child’s Casket.” Holston Journal [Knoxville, Tennessee] 16 April 1863; p. 3.

• advertisement. Holston Journal [Knoxville, Tennessee] 7 May 1863; p. 4. Also, 11 June 1863; p. 4. Also, 6 Aug 1863; p. 2.

• “Child’s Casket.” Daily Constitutionalist [Augusta, Georgia] 9 June 1863; p. 3.

• “Child’s Casket.” Holston Journal [Knoxville, Tennessee] 18 June 1863; p. 2.

• R. N. Price. Holston Methodism. Nashville, Tennessee: Publishing house of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, 1913; vol 4: pp. 313, 421-423.

Children’s Guide ; July 1863-Aug 1865

edited by: John W. Burke

published: Macon, Georgia: John W. Burke.

frequency: monthly: 1st day of month; 1 vol/ year

description: 4 pp.; page size, 11.75″ h. Prices: 1 copy, $1/ year; 10 copies, 70¢/ year; 20 copies, 60¢/ year; 50 copies, 50¢/ year; 100 copies, 40¢/ year

• Religious focus: Methodist

relevant quote: The Guide may have changed physically in its second year: “The first number of the second Volume of this interesting and valuable Sabbath School paper, comes to us in a new dress, and generally improved in its typographical appearance, (which, by the way, was very good before.) We have observed the course of this little paper for the past year, and find everything to recommend it to the favor of Sabbath School teachers and heads of families. It is perfectly free from Sectarianism.” [“The Children’s Guide” July 1864]

source of information: Kennerly; Batsel; NUC; notices, etc., below

available: “A Beautiful Scene,” by Jane T. H. Cross, was reprinted in The Daily Journal [Wilmington, North Carolina] 21 Dec 1864; p. 2.

bibliography:

• “The Children’s Guide.” The Lancaster News [Lancaster, South Carolina] 8 July 1863; p. 2.

• “The Children’s Guide.” The Lancaster News [Lancaster, South Carolina] 12 July 1864; p. 2.

• Bertram Holland Flanders. Early Georgia Magazines. Athens, Georgia: University of Georgia Press, 1944.

• Sarah Law Kennerly. “Confederate Juvenile Imprints: Children’s Books and Periodicals Published in the Confederate States of America, 1861-1865.” PhD diss. University of Michigan, 1956.

• Daniel W. Stowell. Rebuilding Zion: The Religious Reconstruction of the South, 1863-1877. New York: Oxford University Press, 1998; p. 115, 119.

The Young Pilgrim ; Sept 1863-after 1925

cover/masthead: 1869

edited by: 1869-1872, William B. Herron

• July 1872, C. E. Barnes

published: Boston, Massachusetts: Christian Publication Society, 1863. • Boston, Massachusetts: the Advent Christian Publication Society, 1869; publisher at 167 Hanover St.

frequency: Sept 1863-1 May 1864, monthly. 1 May 1864-Dec 1900, semimonthly. 1 Jan 1901-after 1925, weekly

description: 1869: 4 pp.; page size, 13.5″ h x 10″ w. Prices: 1-10 copies, 50¢/ year each; 10-49 copies, 40¢/year each; 50+ copies, 35¢/year each

• Vol 7 #24 is 18 Dec 1869

• Religious focus

source of information: Dec 1869 copy; AAS

available: AASHistPer, series 5

bibliography:

Geo. P. Rowell & Co’s American Newspaper Directory. New York: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1869; p. 46. [archive.org]

The Men Who Advertise. New York: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1870; p. 665. [google books]

Geo. P. Rowell & Co.’s American Newspaper Directory. New York: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1871; p. 64. [hathitrust.org]

Geo. P. Rowell & Co.’s American Newspaper Directory. New York: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1872; p. 74. [archive.org]

• notice. Christian World 23 (June 1872); p. 199.

• “Salem.” The Boston Globe [Boston, Massachusetts] 7 July 1873; p. 8.

• “The Advents.” Boston Post [Boston, Massachusetts] 18 Aug 1881; p. 1.

• “Two Interested Services.” The Boston Globe [Boston, Massachusetts] 25 Aug 1882; p. 4.

• Albert C. Johnson. Advent Christian History. Boston, Massachusetts: Advent Christian Publication Society, 1918; pp. 488-489, 494. [archive.org]

• Beulah May Bowden. “History of the Advent Christian Church.” Master’s thesis. University of Wisconsin, 1920; pp. 163-164, 171-172. [google books]

N.W. Ayer & Son’s American Newspaper Annual and Directory. Philadelphia: N. W. Ayer & Sons, 1925; p. 456. [google books]

The Experiment: a Juvenile Monthly ; Jan 1864-

published: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania: N.p.; printed by J. Richards

frequency: monthly

description: Page size, 10.5″ h

source of information: OCLC; AAS catalog

The Youth’s Visitor ; Jan 1864-Oct 1872

edited by: Jan 1864-Jan 1865, R. Hutchinson • Feb 1865-Oct 1872, John M. Orrock

published: Boston, Massachusetts: the American Millenial Association; publisher with “branch office” in Rock Island, 1869. • Also published in Quebec, 1866-1872

frequency: 1 vol/ year • Jan 1864-Dec 1865, monthly

• Jan 1866-Dec 1868, semimonthly • Jan 1869-Oct 1872, monthly

description: Jan 1866-Dec 1868, price 40¢/ year • 1869-1872, 4 pp.; page size, 20″ h x 15″ w; price, 25¢

relevant information:

• The Visitor accepted no advertisements.

• The Advent Herald published the tables of contents for some issues: April 1869 [30 March 1869]; June 1869 [8 June 1869]; Sept 1869 [7 Sept 1869]; Nov 1869 [3 Nov 1869]; Dec 1869 [15 Dec 1869]

source of information: OCLC; NUC; Advent Herald; Rowell

bibliography:

• “The Youth’s Visitor.” Voice of the West 5 (6 Aug 1867); p. 3.

Geo. P. Rowell & Co’s American Newspaper Directory. New York: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1869; p. 46. [archive.org]

• “The Youth’s Visitor—Special Notice.” The Advent Herald 30 (12 Jan 1869); p. 6.

• advertisement. The Advent Herald 30 (19 Jan 1869); p. 11.

• “The Youth’s Visitor.” The Advent Herald 30 (30 March 1869); p. 50.

• advertisement. The Advent Herald 30 (4 May 1869); p. 72.

• “The Youth’s Visitor.” The Advent Herald 30 (8 June 1869); p. 91.

• “The Youth’s Visitor.” The Advent Herald 30 (7 Sept 1869); p. 142.

• “The Youth’s Visitor.” The Advent Herald 30 (3 Nov 1869); p. 170.

• “The Youth’s Visitor.” The Advent Herald 30 (15 Dec 1869); p. 194.

The Men Who Advertise. New York: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1870; p. 666. [google books]

• “Youth’s Visitor.” Advent-Christian Times 7 (19 April 1870); p. 147.

Geo. P. Rowell & Co.’s American Newspaper Directory. New York: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1872; pp. 75-76. [archive.org]

The School and Family Visitor ; 15 April-Sept 1864

edited by: W. N. Hailman

published: Louisville, Kentucky

frequency: monthly; first Monday of the month

description: 32 pp.; price, $2/ year. page size, 8″ h

relevant quote: The Visitor was intended to be welcomed by a wide audience: “We have received the prospectus of ‘The School and Family Visitor,’ the first number of which will be issued on the 15th of April next, at Louisville, Ky. The Visitor is to be under the editorial charge of Prof. W. N. Hailman, of the Louisville High School. For the teacher, it will contain articles on the practical duties of his profession, educational intelligence, and reviews of books. To parents and children it will bring articles on home instruction, concise biographies, instructive anecdotes, stories, enigmas, etc. To all it will furnish interesting articles on science, art, and literature, with a current history of their progress. The establishment of an educational periodical in the ‘border state’ of Kentucky, is a sign of the times. In fact, one of the remarkable results of this war is found in the great activity which already prevails in the expansion of our educational system, and the aggressive movements of the common schools toward the far South.” [“Literary Notices”]

• The number of pages may have varied: “Each number will contain at least thirty-two pages of valuable reading matter for the Schoolroom, the Fireside, and for the Little Folks.” [notice. 20 April 1864]

source of information: ULS; OCLC; American Educational Monthly; Massachusetts Teacher

bibliography:

• “Literary Notices.” American Educational Monthly 1 (April 1864); p. 127.

• notice. The Owensboro Monitor [Owensboro, Kentucky] 20 April 1864; p. 5.

• notice of May issue. The Owensboro Monitor [Owensboro, Kentucky] 11 May 1864; p. 3.

• “Educational Intelligence.” Massachusetts Teacher and Journal of Home and School Education 17 (July 1864); p. 264.

Sunday School Messenger ; June 1864-29 June 1947

published: Cleveland, Ohio; Evangelical Association, June 1864-31 Dec 1922. Harrisburg, Pennsylvania: Publishing House of the Evangelical Church, 7 Jan 1923-29 June 1947

frequency: 1876, weekly • 1879, weekly, semi-monthly, monthly

description: page size, 14″ h • 1876, 4 pp.

• Circulation: 1868, 11,000 [“General”] • 1879, 35000 [Johnson]

• Religious focus: Evangelical

source of information: “General Conference”; Drew University Library Catalog; Johnson

available: AASHistPer, series 5 (1876 only)

bibliography:

• “General Conference of 1868.” Western Christian Advocate 35 (27 May 1868); p. 169.

• Crisfield Johnson, comp. History of Cuyahoga County, Ohio. N.p.: D. W. Ensign & Co., 1879; p. 197. [archive.org]

• S. N. D. North. History and Present Condition of the Newspaper and Periodical Press of the United States. N.p.: N.p., 1881; p. 411.

California Youths’ Companion ; 3 Dec 1864-27 Sept 1866 • Pacific Pioneer and Youth’s Literary Companion ; Oct 1866-after 25 Jan 1867

cover/masthead: 1865-1866

edited by: W. B. Ewer

published: San Francisco, California: Smith & Edgar, 1864.

• San Francisco, California: Smith & Co., 1865; publisher at 505 Clay St.

• San Francisco, California: Dewey & Co., March 1866; publisher at 505 Clay St.

• San Francisco, California: Smith & Kelly, Sept 1866; publisher at 505 Clay St..

frequency: weekly; Friday

description: 1865-1866, 8 pp • price: 1865, $2.40/ year; March 1866, $2.50/ year; Sept 1866, $2/ year

• Vol 3 #12 is 20 April 1866

relevant information: The Companion regularly published letters from subscribers. Before the paper changed its name in 1866, it apparently asked readers for suggestions.

relevant quotes:

• The editor of the San Francisco Chronicle had some fun with an anti-smoking piece published in the Companion, which pointed out that “Dr. Richardson has found that one good Havana cigar will yield, when its smoke is condensed, a sufficient amount of poisoned matter to induce active convulsions in a rabbit, and six pipes of common shag tobacco will yield sufficient poison to destroy a rabbit in three minutes”: “The deduction is plain and simple: It is very unhealthy for rabbits to smoke good Havana cigars …. Also it would be in the last degree fool hardy and absurd for a rabbit to indulge in more than five pipes of ‘common shag tobacco’ …. The moral of the treatise is palpable—rabbits should indulge in tobacco only in the strictest moderation, and it would even be good judgment in them to abstain from its use altogether.” [“To Smokers.”]

• The editor of the Companion worked to lend a sense of mystery to the name change in late 1866: “Next week, which will be the first week in October, we issue the first number of the new paper with the New Name and the New price. The New Name we won’t say much about now—you may see and judge for yourselves next week.” [“To Our Subscribers.” 3 (27 Sept 1866); p. 4] Each time future issues were mentioned in the Sept 27 issue, the paper was referred to as “New Name”.

• On the name change: “The California Youth’s Companion has changed its name to ‘The Pacific Pioneer and Youth’s Literary Companion,’ and comes to us enlarged and greatly improved. we judge from some very excellent articles therein, that Prof. Knowlton is giving to its pages the benefit of his intellectual energies. The boys and girls of our State should be proud of their new journal. Weekly; $2 per year. Smith & Kelly, San Francisco.” [“Pacific Pioneer”]

source of information: OCLC; NUC; AASHistPer; CA Teacher

available: AASHistPer, series 4 & 5

bibliography:

• “ ‘California Youth’s Companion.’ ” The Washington Standard [Olympia, Washington] 31 Dec 1864; p. 2.

• “To Smokers.” San Francisco Chronicle [San Francisco, California] 13 Dec 1865; p. 2.

• “Enlarged and Improved.” Santa Cruz Weekly [Santa Cruz, California] 20 Oct 1866; p. 3.

• “Pacific Pioneer.” The California Teacher 4 (Nov 1866); p. 141. [google books]

Sunday School Herald ; 1865-after 1926

edited by: 1869-1875, H. Y. Rush

published: Dayton, Ohio: O. A. Roberts, 1869-1870. Dayton, Ohio: Christian Publishing Association, 1871-1875

frequency: semimonthly

description: 1869-1874: 4 pp.; price, 30¢/ year

• Circulation: 1869-1870, 12,000. 1871, 15,000. 1872, 25,000. 1873, 35,000. 1874, 50,000. 1875, 53,000

• Vol 10 #2 is 15 Nov 1874. Vol 11 #11 is 1 April 1876; vol 11 #12 is 15 April 1876

source of information: references, below

available: AASHistPer, series 5

bibliography:

Geo. P. Rowell & Co’s American Newspaper Directory. NY: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1869; p. 87

The Men Who Advertise. New York: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1870; p. 720.

Geo. P. Rowell & Co’s American Newspaper Directory. New York: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1871; p. 123; copy online at UNT Digital Libraries

Geo. P. Rowell & Co.’s American Newspaper Directory. New York: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1872; p. 143.

Geo. P. Rowell & Co’s American Newspaper Directory. New York: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1873; p. 173. [archive.org]

Geo. P. Rowell & Co’s American Newspaper Directory. New York, New York: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1874; p. 161.

Geo. P. Rowell & Co’s American Newspaper Directory. New York, New York: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1875; p. 174.

Postal Rates: Hearings Before the Special Joint Subcommittee on Postal Rates. Washington, District of Columbia: Government Printing Office, 1926; vol 2: p. 1208.

St. Alfonso’s Angel (perhaps, St. Alphonsus’ Angel) ; in 1865

published: Franklin County, Vermont

frequency: weekly

relevant information: Senex’s coyly sarcastic diatribe is the only mention of this periodical found

relevant quote: Because there is no other indication that the Angel was published, Senex’s entire letter is reprinted here; except for [sic], square brackets are in the original:

Mr. Editor:

I beg you will allow me space in which to call the attention of your readers to a weekly [I trust the compositor will avoid typographical errors as much as possible,] child’s paper published in Franklin Co., and called, “St. Alfonso’s Angel.” There is no doubt of the euphony of the title chosen for this little sheet, but there are some things about the paper which are not so funny as the euphony. And these I shall make the topic of this present communication.

As very few of your readers have probably ever heard of this little “Angel,” I will briefly describe it. First let me do it the justice to say that although its title does certainly smack (to a true Puritan taste) of “ragged Popery,” yet its influence is lent quite impartially to both Papist and Puritan. But as the sheet can in no sense be called a religious paper—distributing as it does the attention and patronage charitably (that is, so far as charity is compatible with ten cents per line) among the various interests of Religion, the World and the Flesh (particularly the latter two, and of these two specially the last)—it would manifestly be unfair to examine it critically in a character to which it does not pretend to lay claim.

The paper is divided up into several different departments, in which its reading matter is designed to be arranged according to the varying capacity of infancy, childhood and youth. To its infant readers it furnishes a weekly [I hope the compositor is on his guard] column or two on the second page. I have no fault to find, I own, with the comparatively small supply of reading in this department. Until the number of literary infants shall have increased beyond its present measure, the supply is manifestly sufficient. I will only say in this connection that I have a curious suspicion that for some cause or other the editors do not desire that the demand upon this particular department should increase. Their efforts in another department would seem directed towards a positive diminishinge [sic] of the present demand. The department which is devoted to the entertainment of childhood is diffused miscellaneously over the first and second pages of the Angel. This ingenious arrangement serves as a sort of puzzle for the little folks which doubtless enhances the value of the paper to them several fold. It is a complete scrap-book, and supersedes the old-fashioned bother of scissors and paste. It must be granted that this department is tolerably successful, presenting a perfect fac-simile of those ancient laborious compilations which we old people used to put together in our innocent days of half a century ago. The youth’s department is perhaps the most striking of all, and of all it is no doubt the most successful, furnishing as it does ample food for the youthful imagination and presenting in the most seductive manner, clothed in all the charming and attractive forms of type and illustrations to be found in this angelic [the compositor will please be particular about the small “a”] font. This department is chiefly composed of advertisements, and is embellished with several interesting pictures.

But I must hasten on to the immediate object of this communication which is simply but squarely to protest against one great fault which, in spite of the thousand excellences of this little weekling, [I beg leave once more to caution the compositor] two or three of which I could not help glancing at above, I must consider such a great and crying evil as to warrant a public exposure. Much as I regret to say a single harsh word—even where so richly deserved—the precious interests of the dear children and grandchildren who are growing up around me drive me to expose the abominable, contagious and demoralizing tendency of the BAD SPELLING and other mutilations of grammar of which “St. Alfonso’s Angel” is guilty.

Of what use is it, I ask, to send our little ones to school, if the correct habits which they are taught there are to be neutralized every week by such a villainous example as this child’s paper sets, in this particular? The citations which I might make to support the justice of my complaint could scarcely be contained in several numbers of your paper, even were your entire space to be devoted to this one object. I must therefore content myself with one or two specimens in a million.

But as my letter has grown so long, I will not tax your space at this time by appending even the moderate list of examples which I have prepared. If, however, the outraged public should demand it, I promise that it shall be instantly forthcoming.

I remain, Sir, with great respect, Your obedient, humble servant.

SENEX.

May, 30, 1865.

P. S.—I understand that there is another paper besides the Transcript published in St. Albans. I trust the Editors thereof will lend their aid to abate the nuisance of which I speak.

S.

source of information: Senex

bibliography:

• Senex. “St. Alfonso’s Angel” The Vermont Transcript [St. Albans, Vermont] 16 June 1865; p. 1.

The Young Evangelist ; 1865-1921 • The Junior World ; 1922-1949?

published: St. Louis, Missouri: Christian Publishing.

frequency: weekly

description: Page size, 13.75″ h • 2 Feb 1902 is vol 27 #5 • Last issue listed in OCLC is March 1906 (vol 31 #3)

• Religious focus

source of information: OCLC

bibliography:

• William R. Kane, comp. 1001 Places to Sell Manuscripts, 9th ed. Ridgewood, New Jersey: The Editor Company, 1913; pp. 293-294.

• William R. Kane, comp. 1001 Places to Sell Manuscripts, 9th ed. Ridgewood, New Jersey: The Editor Company, 1915; p. 262.

• James Knapp Reeve, comp. The New 1001 Places to Sell Manuscripts. Franklin, Ohio: J. K. Reeve, 1922; p. 83.

• “The Writer’s Directory of Periodicals.” The Writer 32 (April 1920)

Official Manual of the State of Missouri. Jefferson City, Missouri: Secretary of State, 1949-1950; p. 1189.

Missionary Visitor ; 1865-1895 • Children’s Visitor; 1896-1901

published: Dayton, Ohio: D[aniel] K. Flickinger, 1865-1885

frequency: semimonthly; 1 vol/ year • 22 June 1878 is vol. 13, #24

description: Religious focus

absorbed by: The Children’s FriendFriend for Boys and Girls (Dayton, Ohio; 1854-1917)

source of information: Batsel; OCLC

bibliography:

• “Kansas Conference of United Brethren.” The Daily Kansas Tribune [Lawrence, Kansas] 14 April 1867; p. 2.

• “United Brethren Conference at Duncannon.” Harrisburg Telegraph [Harrisburg, Pennsylvania] 24 Feb 1872; p. 3.

• “D. K. Flickinger Passes From Life.” Butler County Democrat [Hamilton, Ohio] 7 Sept 1911; p. 5.

Young Catholic’s Friend ; 1865-1880?

published: Chicago, Illinois: J. J. Kearney

frequency: monthly

description: Religious focus: Catholic

relevant information: Williams gives a possible end date of 1880; however, the Friend is not listed among the periodicals in the Chicago City Directory for 1868. [“Chicago Periodicals.” Prairie Farmer 39 (25 July 1868); p. 28.]

source of information: Scott; Williams

bibliography:

• Franklin William Scott. Newspapers and Periodicals of Illinois. N.p.: Franklin William Scott, 1910; p. 86. [archive.org]

• Kenny J. Williams. Prairie Voices: A Literary History of Chicago from the Frontier to 1893. Nashville, Tennessee: Townsend Press, 1980; p. 409.

Our Young Folks ; Jan 1865-Dec 1873

cover/masthead: 1865-1867, winter | 1865-1867, spring | 1865-1867, summer | 1865-1867, autumn | 1868-1873

edited by: John Townsend Trowbridge; Abigail Dodge (“Gail Hamilton”); Lucy Larcom, 1865-1867

• John Townsend Trowbridge; Lucy Larcom, 1867-1873

published: Boston, Massachusetts: Ticknor & Fields, Jan 1865-1868. Boston, Massachusetts: Fields, Osgood & Co., 1869-1873.

• New York, New York: The American News Company, Jan 1865-Sept 1866.

• Philadelphia, Pennsylvania: T. B. Pugh, Jan 1865-Sept 1866.

• Chicago, Illinois: John R. Walsh, Jan 1865. Chicago, Illinois: Western News Co., Sept 1866.

frequency: monthly; 1 vol/ year

description: Jan 1865, 80 pp.; Feb 1865, 72 pp.; March, April 1865, 68 pp.; May 1865, 64 pp.; June 1865, 68 pp.; July 1865-Dec 1872, 64 pp.

• Page size untrimmed, 8.75″ h x 6″ w • Price: 20¢/ issue; $2/ year

• Circulation: Dec 1867 (from magazine), 50,000; 1869 (from magazine), 76,543; 1869-1870 (from Rowell), 40,000; 1872 (from Rowell), 35,000

relevant information:

• A lawsuit lodged against E. C. Allen states that the first issue of Our Young Folks was Dec 1864. [“Law and the Courts”]

• On the list of periodicals subscribed to by the Massachusetts State Reform School in 1867. [Twenty-First Annual Report]

• Contents of March 1868 are described in The New York Times [20 Feb 1868]

relevant quotes:

• The New York Times credited Our Young Folks for “encouraging other publishers to make ventures in the same direction,” including Riverside Magazine for Young People.

• In 1872, Osgood & Co. sued Edward C. Allen, editor and publisher of Our Young Folks’ Illustrated Paper, for infringing their title: “The complainants are the well-known publishers of Boston, who are proprietors and publishers of ‘Our Young Folks,’ an illustrated magazine for young people, first published in December, 1864. The title of the magazine was entered according to law, for the purpose of securing the copyright, and each number of the magazine has been copyrighted before publication. Complainants allege an exclusive right to use the title ‘Our Young Folks,’ arising from the copyright so obtained, and from the fact that they were the first to apply the title to a magazine, etc. The respondent, a publisher at Augusta, Me., announced that he would publish, … commencing October 1, 1871, an illustrated publication for young people, under the title ‘Our Young Folks’ Illustrated Paper,’ and did issue a very large edition of the same, and, upon demand by the complainants before publication, he refused and still refuses to withdraw the announcement or to change the title, and has published and sold large numbers under said title. Relief is sought by complainants not only under the law of copyright but upon the general ground of equity as related to the good will of trades and the doctrine of trade-marks. … The agreed statement of facts is silent on the question whether the public are deceived or are in danger of being deceived as alleged. And whether the customers of the complainants or the public are induced to believe, or are in danger of being induced to believe, that respondent’s publication is in fact the complainants’, and thereby led to the purchase of the respondent’s magazine under the belief that it is the complainants’. The case will, therefore, be referred to a master to ascertain and report the fact upon the foregoing questions to the court, and further proceedings in the case will be stayed until the coming in of the master’s report. R. M. Morse, Jr., and R. Stone, Jr., Butler & Fessenden of Portland, for plaintiffs; Causten Browne and J. S. Holmes, A. R. Strout of Portland, for defendants.” [“Law and the Courts”] The case was interesting, as the Morning Oregonian explains: “Osgood & Co. brought suit to restrain the publication of Allen’s magazine, basing their claims for relief upon two grounds: First, that the copyright secured to them the exclusive right to use the title; and, second, that in the name of their magazine, regardless of the question of copyright, they were entitled to protection on principles analogous to those upon which trade marks are protected. It was alleged in the complaint that the similarity of names misled and deceived the public. The first point the court—Judge Shepley—overruled, holding that the copyright gave no protection to the title page separately, or in any manner except as it constituted a part of the book. But he sustained the complaint on the second point, and held that a name lawfully adopted stands the same before the law as a trade mark, and is entitled to protection against piracy, upon recognized principles of equity-jurisprudence. The case was referred to a master to take the evidence and to report whether the facts were as alledged.” [“An Interesting Decision”] By the end of the year, however, both periodicals had ceased publication.

• Osgood & Co. sold their interests in all their magazines in Nov 1873: “Messrs. James R. Osgood & Co., of Boston, proposing to relinquish the business of magazine publishing, have sold their periodicals, the Atlantic Monthly and Every Saturday, to Messrs. Hurd & Houghton of New York, and Messrs. Houghton & Co., of the Riverside Press, and Our Young Folks to Messrs. Scribner & Co., of New York, publishers of the new juvenile magazine, St. Nicholas.” [“News and Other Items”]

• The Dec 1873 issue of Our Young Folks holds no hint that the magazine was about to be absorbed by another periodical; in fact, it contains a description of stories and serials planned for 1874, when the periodical would have a new look: “We have the satisfaction to announce that ‘Our Young Folks’ will bid its readers a Happy New Year in an entirely new suit of beautiful type; and that there will be other improvements in the mechanical appearance of the magazine, to correspond with its more elegant dress.” [9 (Dec 1873); p. 764] Other plans included publication of “Fast Friends,” a serial by John Townsend Trowbridge, and something just for young readers: “For the special benefit of youngest readers, we shall next year carry out a novel plan which we have long had in contemplation. The little ones, we are sure, will be delighted with it; and friends who have had a peep at the design declare that it will be no less entertaining to all.” [9 (Dec 1873); p. 764]

• Subscribers probably learned of the magazine’s fate when St. Nicholas appeared in their post office boxes instead of Our Young Folks; the issue included a note from John Townsend Trowbridge: “Through the courtesy of the conductor of St. Nicholas, I am enabled to say a few words to the readers of ‘Our Young Folks,’ in place of the many I should have wished to say in the last number of that lamented magazine, had it been known to be the last when it left the editorial hands. That number was sent to its readers in the full faith that all it promised them for the coming year was to be more than fulfilled. But it had scarcely gone forth, when came the sudden change by which ‘Our Young Folks’ ceased to exist—the result of a purely commercial transaction, wholly justifiable, I think, on the part of the publishers, J. R. Osgood and Company, of whose honorable and liberal conduct in all that related to the little magazine, up to the very last, I can speak with the better grace now that my editorial connection with their house has ceased. … The serial story, prepared for the late magazine, is herewith transferred to St. Nicholas ….” [“A Card from the Editor of ‘Our Young Folks.’ ” St. Nicholas. 1 (Jan 1874); p. 160]

• A few months after its demise, Our Young Folks was ranked by readers as “the best of modern American juvenile magazines” in an unscientific poll reported by The Literary World. (Ironically, they put St. Nicholas in last place.) [5 (1 Aug 1874); p. 45]

absorbed by: St. Nicholas ; Nov 1873-Feb 1940, 1943

source of information: Jan 1865, Sept-Oct 1866 issues, 1873 scattered issues; 1865-1872 bound volumes; St. Nicholas; Lyon; Kelly; Rowell

available: AASHistPer, series 4 & 5

• APS III (1850-1900), reel 65-66

• excerpts in Yesterday’s Children, ed. John Morton Blum. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Houghton Mifflin Company, The Riverside Press, 1959.

• excerpts in Companions of Our Youth: Stories by Women for Young People’s Magazines, 1865-1900, ed. Jane Benardete and Phyllis Moe. New York: Frederick Ungar Publishing Co., 1980.

• excerpts in Lessons of War: The Civil War in Children’s Magazines, ed. James Marten. Wilmington, Delaware: Scholarly Resources, 1998.

excerpts online

bibliography:

• Messrs. Ticknor & Fields, Boston. The Burlington Weekly Sentinel [Burlington, Vermont] 11 Nov 1864; p. 2.

• “ ‘Our Young Folks’—A Welcome Announcement.” Urbana Union [Urbana, Ohio] 23 Nov 1864; p. 2.

• “The Reviews and Magazines”: Our Young Folks. The New York Times [New York, New York] 31 Jan 1865; p. 2.

• Our Young Folks. Brookville Republican [brookville, Pennsylvania] 22 March 1865; p. 3.

• “What Newspapers to Take.” The St. Johnsbury Caledonian [St. Johnsbury, Vermont] 18 Dec 1865; p. 2.

• “New Books.” Vermont Record [Brandon, Vermont] 29 Dec 1865; p. 6.

• “Notes on Books and Booksellers: English Appreciation of ‘Our Young Folks.’ ” American Literary Gazette and Publishers’ Circular 7 (15 Sept 1866); p. 219. Also, “English Appreciation of ‘Our Young Folks.’ ” National Republican [Washington, District of Columbia] 21 Sept 1866; p. 1.

• The success of Our Young Folks. The New York Times [New York, New York] 15 Oct 1866; p. 2.

• notice. Banner of Light 20 (8 Dec 1866); p. 4.

• “The Magazines for May.” Bellows Falls Times [Bellows Falls, Vermont] 3 May 1867; p. 2.

• ”Periodicals for August.” The Evansville Daily Journal [Evansville, Indiana] 27 July 1867; p. 4.

• notice. Green-Mountain Freeman [Montpelier, Vermont] 28 Aug 1867; p. 3.

• notice. Southern Cultivator 25 (Oct 1867); p. 329.

• notice. The Ladies’ Repository Nov 1867; p. 398. [google books]

Twenty-First Annual Report of the Trustees of the State Reform School. Boston, Massachusetts: Wright & Potter, 1868; p. 18. [google books]

• notice of Jan issue. The St. Johnsbury Caledonian [St. Johnsbury, Vermont] 3 Jan 1868; p. 1.

• “Magazines for March.” The New York Times 20 Feb 1868; p. 2.

• “Magazines for August.” The New York Times [New York, New York] 21 July 1868; p. 2.

• “Our Book Table.” Bucyrus Journal [Bucyrus, Ohio] 13 Nov 1868; p. 3.

• “Children’s Magazines.” The St. Johnsbury Caledonian [St. Johnsbury, Vermont] 13 Nov 1868; p. 2.

Geo. P. Rowell & Co’s American Newspaper Directory. New York: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1869; p. 46. [archive.org]

• “Magazines for the Young.” Massachusetts Teacher and Journal of Home and School Education 23 (Jan 1870); p. 37.

The Men Who Advertise. New York: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1870; p. 666. [google books]

Wentworth’s Boston Commercial Directory for 1871. Boston, Massachusetts: Wentworth & Co., 1870; p. 119. [google books]

• notice. The Christian Standard 5 (3 Dec 1870); p. 389.

• notice. Christian World 22 (Jan 1871); p. 28.

• “Periodical Literature.” Chicago Tribune [Chicago, Illinois] 27 March 1872; p. 4.

• notice. Christian World 22 (June 1871); p. 207.

• notice. Liberal Christian 27 (6 Jan 1872); p. 2.

• J. R. Osgood & Co. The St. Johnsbury Caledonian [St. Johnsbury, Vermont] 5 April 1872; p. 3.

• notice. Christian World 23 (June 1872); p. 199.

Geo. P. Rowell & Co.’s American Newspaper Directory. New York: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1872; p. 75. [archive.org]

• “Law and the Courts: James R. Osgood et al vs. Edward C. Allen.” The Boston Globe [Boston, Massachusetts] 4 Feb 1873; p. 5.

• “An Interesting Decision.” Morning Oregonian [Portland, Oregon] 18 Feb 1873; p. 2.

• “News and Other Items.” Portland Daily Press [Portland, Maine] 25 Nov 1873; p. 2.

• John Townsend Trowbridge. “A Card from the Editor of ‘Our Young Folks.’ ” St. Nicholas. 1 (Jan 1874); p. 160.

• comment on demise. The Literary World 5 (1 June 1874); p. 15.

• young readers rate. The Literary World 5 (1 Aug 1874); p. 45.

• Frank Luther Mott. A History of American Magazines: vol 3, 1865-1885. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Harvard University Press, 1938. pp. 175.

• Eleanor Weakley Nolen. “Nineteenth Century Children’s Magazines.” The Horn Book Magazine. 15 (Jan/Feb 1939); p. 55-60.

• Mabel F. Altstetter. “Early American Magazines for Children.” Peabody Journal of Education 19 (Nov 1941); p. 133.

• Betty Longenecker Lyon. “A History of Children’s Secular Magazines Published in the United States from 1789-1899.” PhD diss. Johns Hopkins, 1942; pp. 2, 242, 243, 247, 267, 271-276, 318, 377.

• Alice M. Jordan. “ ‘Our Young Folks’: Its Editors and Authors.” In From Rollo to Tom Sawyer, and Other Papers. Boston, Massachusetts: The Horn Book, Inc., 1948.

• John Morton Blum, ed. Yesterday’s Children. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Houghton Mifflin Company, The Riverside Press, 1959.

• R. Gordon Kelly. Mother was a Lady. Westport, Connecticut: Greenwood Press, 1974.

Children’s Periodicals of the United States, ed. R. Gordon Kelly. Westport, Connecticut & London, England: Greenwood Press, 1984.

• Gillian Avery. Behold the Child: American Children and Their Books, 1621-1922. Baltimore, Maryland: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1994; p. 146.

• James Marten. “For the Good, the True, and the Beautiful: Northern Children’s Magazines and the Civil War.” Civil War History 41 (March 1995); p. 57-75.

Lessons of War: The Civil War in Children’s Magazines, ed. James Marten. Wilmington, Delaware: Scholarly Resources, 1998.

• Brandy Parris. “Difficult Sympathy in the Reconstruction-Era Animal Stories of Our Young Folks.” Children’s Literature, 31 (2003); pp. 25-49.

• Lorinda B. Cohoon. “Necessary Badness: Reconstructing Postbellum Boyhood Citizenships in Our Young Folks and The Story of a Bad Boy,” in Serialized Citizenships: Periodicals, Books, and American Boys, 1840-1911. Lanham, Maryland: The Scarecrow Press, 2006; pp. 89-118.

The Little Sower ; Jan 1865-1886

cover/masthead: 1865

edited by: William Worth Dowling • Lydia R. Putnam

published: Indianapolis, Indiana: William Worth Dowling, Jan 1865-1877.

• St. Louis, Missouri: Christian Publishing Co., 1878-1886

frequency: 1865, monthly; 1869, weekly; 1870, weekly & monthly; 1872, weekly, semimonthly, & monthly

description: 1865, 1869-1870, 8 pp. 1872, 32 pp.

• Page size, 10″ h x 7″ w

• Price: 1865, 1 copy, 50¢/ year; 5 copies, $2/ year; 10 copies, $3.50/ year; 50 copies, $12.50/ year; 100 copies, $18/ year. 1869, $1/ year; 1870, $1.25/ year. 1872: weekly, 50 copies, $33/ year; 100 copies, $60/ year; semimonthly, 50 copies, $18/ year; 100 copies, $30/ year; monthly, $1/ year

• Circulation: 1869, 22,000; 1870, 29,000; 1872, 36,000; Aug 1872, 120,000

• Religious focus: “It circulates among all denominations in every State and Territory of the Union, in every British Province of North America, and reaches even Great Britain, Australia, and Jamaica.” [“The Little Sower.” The Herald and Mail]

relevant information:

• In 1875, Dowling was investigated (and cleared) for having “improper intercourse with one of his employes, a young girl”; see “An investigation of William Worth Dowling,” below.

• A copy of the Sower was deposited in the cornerstone of the Methodist Episcopal Church in Sedan, Kansas, in 1878.

• Listed in newspaper directories in 1885 and 1886, in 1887, the Sower is mentioned as something to be remembered, implying that it was no longer published.

relevant quotes:

• The editor greeted readers by acknowledging that the paper’s title might be considered unusual: “ ‘What an odd name for a paper!’ methinks I hear little Metta exclaim, as she takes up the first number of the Little Sower. ‘And what an odd season to send out a Sower;’ chimes in Eddie, catching a glimpse of the title over Meta’s shoulder, as he comes in from the skating pond, bundled up in his new cloak. ‘Who ever heard of any one sowing seeds in the middle of winter?’ True, dear little ones, rather an odd name to be sure, but perhaps you will not think it such a bad one after all; and as to the weather, there are many comfortable and happy homes and schools into which the Little Sower hopes to be invited, where, in defiance of ice and snow, he may sow the precious seed in the minds of the dear children. The seed he desires to sow is the blessed word ofGod; he wishes to teach you to be kind to each other; to love and obey your parents; and, better than all, to love and obey the blessed Jesus, and to be like him. Will not you, Metta and Eddie, and every other little boy or girl who reads this, do something to help him? Will you not introduce him into other homes where you think he may have a chance to sow? Can you not do some thing to frighten away those great fowls of the air that follow him, to pick up every stray seed that may fall by the way-side? Can you not assist in clearing away the stones that prevent the seed from taking deep root in some places, and pulling up the thorns and thistles that are springing up to choke it in others? And, finely, [sic] will you not, one and all, after reading this, and looking again at the picture on the first page, get your Testaments and read carefully the thirteenth chapter of Matthew, and then resolve that the seed which falls in your hearts shall be as that which fell upon good ground”. [“Greeting.” 1 (Jan 1865); p. 7]

• The Sower is subscribed for by Addie in “A Story for Children,” printed in The Rutherford Star [Rutherfordton, North Carolina]; complaining because her mother has told her that there is no Santa Claus, while her friend has received 10 cents from him, Addie is reminded that she was given “money to send for the ‘Little Sower’ that will be full of pretty pictures and useful stories, I think you will be as happy with your paper as Charlie with his ten cents when it comes.”

• In 1904 Dowling reminisced about the Sower in the pages of his church’s new juvenile periodical, Our Young Folks, in a piece reprinted in the periodical for adults: “Thirty-nine years ago, the first of the present month, the editor of this journal issued the first number of The Little Sower, an eight-page monthly for Christian Sunday-schools. It seemed to meet a ‘long felt want,’ and prospered from the first. At the beginning of the second volume it became a semi-monthly, and at the beginning of the fifth year, a weekly. Indianapolis continued as the place of publication until the year 1878, when the office of publication was removed to St. Louis and became a part of the Christian Pub. Co. A few years later, in a general consolidation of publishing interests, The Little Sower united its fortunes with another Christian Sunday school weekly and took the name of The Sunday-school Evangelist; and still later that of The Young Evangelist. But through all these thirty-nine eventful years, there has been no change in the chief editorship.” [in “The Oldest Editor”] Given that vol 23 of the Sunday-School Evangelist is 1898, the volume numbers for the Evangelist may have continued from the Sower.

continued by: Sunday School Evangelist

source of information: notices, etc., below; OCLC; AASHistPer, series 4

available: AASHistPer, series 4 & 5

• Pieces occasionally were reprinted in various papers: “The Postage Stamp,” in the Vermont Chronicle [Bellows Falls, Vermont; 10 Aug 1878; p. 4]; “A Wise Captain,” in The Marksville Bulletin [Marksville, Louisiana; 14 Aug 1886; p. 5]

bibliography:

• Louisa. “A Story for Children.” The Rutherford Star [Rutherfordton, North Carolina] 9 Jan 1867; p. 1.

• notice. American Phrenological Journal 49 (April 1869); p. 165.

Geo. P. Rowell & Co’s American Newspaper Directory. New York: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1869; p. 28. [archive.org]

The Men Who Advertise. New York: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1870; p. 644. [google books]

• We are indebted to W. W. Dowling. The Indianapolis News [Indianapolis, Indiana] 15 Jan 1870; p. 4.

• notice. The Phrenological Journal and Science of Health 50 (March 1870); p. 223.

• The month part. The Indianapolis News [Indianapolis, Indiana] 28 May 1870; p. 4.

• notice. The Christian Standard 5 (3 Dec 1870); p. 389.

Geo. P. Rowell & Co.’s American Newspaper Directory. New York: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1872; p. 44. [archive.org]

• advertisement. Kings County Rural Gazette [Brooklyn, New York] 1 June 1872; p. 2.

• “Literary and Journalistic.” The Indianapolis News [Indianapolis, Indiana] 31 Aug 1872; p. 2.

• “The Little Sower.” The Herald and Mail [Columbia, Tennessee] 13 Sept 1872; p. 3. Also, Spirit of the Age [Woodstock, Vermont] 19 Sept 1872; p. 2.

• An investigation of William Worth Dowling: “The Charges Against Mr. Dowling.” The Indianapolis News [Indianapolis, Indiana] 21 May 1875; p. 4. The Disciples have been extremely prompt. The Waterloo Press [Waterloo, Indiana] 10 June 1875; p. 2.

• advertisement. New York Evangelist 48 (12 April 1877); p. 5.

• “Corner Stone.” The Chautauqua Journal [Sedan, Kansas] 5 July 1878; p. 3.

Geo. P. Rowell & Co’s American Newspaper Directory. New York, New York: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1885; p. 310 [archive.org]

American Newspaper Directory. New York, New York: n.p., 1886; p. 343 [archive.org]

• Miss Lydia R. Putnam. The Indianapolis News [Indianapolis, Indiana] 3 Nov 1887; p. 1.

• “The Oldest Editor.” The Christian-Evangelist 41 (28 Jan 1904); p. 119. [google books]

Child’s BannerChildren’s Banner ; 15 Feb 1865-1865

edited by: A[dolphus] W[illiamson] Mangum

published: Salisbury, North Carolina: J[ohn] J[oseph] Bruner, 1865

frequency: monthly

description: 4 pp.; page size, 13″ h

• Prices: Jan 1865: 1-9 copies, $2/ copy for six months; 10-49 copies, $1.50/ copy for six months; 50-99 copies, $1.25/ copy for six months; 100+ copies, $1/ copy for six months. [“The Children’s Banner.” Fayetteville Semi-Weekly Observer] • Feb 1865: $2/ copy for six months; 20+ copies, $1.50/ copy for six months. [“The Children’s Banner.” Daily Carolina Watchman]

• Religious focus

relevant information: Only one copy of one issue (15 Feb 1865) currently known to exist

• Advertised as The Children’s Banner, but apparently printed as Child’s Banner.

relevant quote:

• The announcement: “A new Sunday School paper is about to be published monthly in Salisbury, N. C. It is to be called the Children’s Banner, and adapted as nearly as possible to the wants of the little ones. The enterprise is a commendable one. J. J. Bruner, Esq., is to be the proprietor and Rev. A. W. Mangum the editor.” [A new Sunday School paper]

• Advertisement: “We have completed arrangements to publish monthly, in Salisbury, a Sunday School Paper, to be called ‘THE CHILDREN’s [sic] BANNER.’ adapted as nearly as possible to the wants of the children in these days of evil. The importance of this enterprise is surely evident to all. There is no such paper in general circulation in the State, and large portions of adjoining States are alike destitute. It is more needed now than at any previous time, the scarcity of Sunday School books and Sunday School privileges and facilities urgently demands it. It will help the School, Teachers, and Parents, and be a blessing to those children who are prevented by any cause from attending the Sabbath School. It is eminently worthy of your approval and encouragement. Will you not, then, send us a good list of subscribers? Urge upon your friends to take it: and those having no children who need it, to send it to the children of our soldiers, and the poor. Send your subscriptions without delay, that you may get the complete series. Look for the first number about the first of February—it may be earlier. The paper will be published monthly—in four pages—on a sheet over twenty by thirteen inches; printed on good type and with neatness.” [“A New Sunday School Paper”]

source of information: WorldCat; Marten; advertisements, etc., below

available: excerpt in Lessons of War: The Civil War in Children’s Magazines, ed. James Marten. Wilmington, Delaware: Scholarly Resources, 1998.

bibliography:

• notice. Raleigh Daily Confederate [Raleigh, North Carolina] 22 Dec 1864.

• A new Sunday School paper. The Charlotte Democrat [Charlotte, North Carolina] 27 Dec 1864; p. 3.

• “The Children’s Banner.” Fayetteville Semi-Weekly Observer [Fayetteville, North Carolina] 2 Jan 1865; p. 1.

• “A New Sunday School Paper.” The Hillsborough Recorder [Hillsborough, North Carolina] 4 Jan 1865; p. 3.

• “The Children’s Banner.” Daily Carolina Watchman [Salisbury, North Carolina] 21 Feb 1865; p. 1.

• James Marten. The Children’s Civil War. Chapel Hill: The University of North Carolina Press, 1998; pp. 51, 257.

Lessons of War: The Civil War in Children’s Magazines, ed. James Marten. Wilmington, Delaware: Scholarly Resources, 1998.

• Michael T. Bernath. Confederate Minds: The Struggle for Intellectual Independence in the Civil War South. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2010; pp. 195, 334.

The Little Corporal ; July 1865-April 1875

cover/masthead: 1865-1866 | 1869 | early 1870 | July 1870-Oct 1871, Dec 1871 | Nov 1871 | 1872-1873

edited by: July 1865-June 1871, Alfred L. Sewell

• June 1866-Feb 1867, Edward Eggleston, associate ed.

• Aug 1867-1873, Emily Huntington Miller

published: Chicago, Illinois: Alfred L. Sewell, July 1865-1870.

• Chicago, Illinois: Alfred L. Sewell & John Edwin Miller, 1870-June 1871.

• Chicago, Illinois: John Edwin Miller, July 1871-1873; office at 165 West Washington St., 1 May 1872-1873.

frequency: monthly; 2 vol/ year

description: July 1865-June 1870: 16 pp.; page size, 11″ h x 8″ w; price, $1/ year

• July 1870-1871: 32 pp.; octavo; page size untrimmed, 9.25″ h x 6.25″ w

• Nov 1871: sheet folded into 8 pp.; page size untrimmed, 9″ h x 6″ w; marked “supplement number for November, 1871”

• Dec 1871: 48 pp. • Jan 1872: 40 pp. • Feb-Nov 1872: 38 pp. • Dec 1872: 40 pp.

• Circulation: June 1866, 35,000. 1869, 80,000; Feb 1869, “We print now 85,000 copies, full count.” (p. 31); 1869, 89,000 also reported. 1870, 80,000. 1872, 60,000

• An amateur paper called The Little Corporal was published in Stapleton, New York, by William P. Hagadorn; OCLC includes a description of an issue dated 17 Sept 1853

relevant information:

• Advertising rates in 1869 were $1.50 per line, for advertisements on the three pages of the cover (inside front; inside back; back); until this time, rates for the third page of the cover (the back) were lower than for the other two pages. [8 (Feb 1869); p. 31]

• The contents of the Dec 1869 issue were described by the Daily Evening Express. [3 Dec 1869]

• In 1869, the business aspect had grown to the extent that Sewell took a partner, John E. Miller, to handle it. In Feb 1871, Sewell sold the magazine to Miller.

• Recommended at a Kansas teachers’ conference in 1872 to be used for reading exercises in schools

relevant quotes:

• On the founding: Alfred L. Sewell organized children as the Army of the American Eagle, to raise money for the Sanitary Commission and the Christian Commission, in aid of Union soldiers and their families: “Your precious letters, your sweet heart-words, and your earnest patriotism, seemed to breath [sic] into my spirit a new life, and I said, ‘Oh that I had some medium through which I might talk to my gallant children’s army.’ Then the good thought spoke to me … , and said, ‘Here is the ‘Little Corporal,’ send him as your aid-de-camp. Tell him what to say, and let him take besides a bundle of good things to refresh and amuse your little soldiers by the way.’ Then my idea was only to send him forth to do his whole work at the Great Fair. Then there was no thought of a future for him. But then, I thought what will become of my great army when the Fair is over? … Must my army hereafter only live in the memories of its gallant deeds? … I know full well that all of them will be glad to see the Little Corporal’s face month after month, and let him tell them pretty stories, and talk to them of each other, and hold their hearts together, and lead them into good and pleasant ways.” [“How I Came to Print the ‘Little Corporal.’ ” 1 (July 1865); p. 1-2]

• The editor of the Weekly News-Democrat remembers the founding a little differently: “Mr. Sewell ‘struck a lead’ at the time the great Sanitary Fair was held in Chicago. … He commenced the publication of a small paper for young people, intended at first to last only until the Fair, called the ‘Army of the American Eagle.’ All remember the story of ‘Old Abe,’ the eagle which accompanied the Eighth Wisconsin regiment in the south during the war. This paper took its name from Old Abe, and in adddition to printing the paper many thousands of photographs of the eagle were printed and sold as an aid to that Fair. … After the Fair was over and the ‘Army of the American Eagle’ had served the purpose for which it was started, it occurred to Mr. Sewell, from the way in which this little paper for young folks was sought after, and from the large circulation which it had already attained, that there was a wide field open for the establishment of a permanent paper of this character in the great city of the west.” [xtruckStruck a Lead”]

• The Racine Journal approved: “We have just received the first number of the ‘Little Corporal,’ a child’s paper lately started in Chicago. We have looked it over carefully, and we do not remember to have seen a paper that more nearly comes up to our idea of what a child’s paper should be, than the ‘Little Corporal.’ Filled as it is with entertaining stories that teach lessons of charity and benevolence, with here and there a word of good advice. We sincerely hope the paper will succeed, for we hold that there is nothing of such importance as to create a taste in the mind of a child for good reading. There is nothing more delerious [sic] to the young, we think, than this miserable trash that fills the land, in the shape of pirate and robber novels. It is impossible for a child to read of crimes against the laws of God and man, wrought by fiction into heroic deeds, without contaminating the mind of the child. Much better, we think, would it be to give them books and papers which will both amuse and instruct, and at the same time foster a true spirit of christianity and kindness.” [26 July 1865]

• A celebrity subscriber was duly noted: “The President of the United States, through his private secretary, yesterday subscribed for the Little Corporal. We may suppose that he intends to use it as a holiday gift to some one of his juvenile friends. The Little Corporal is universally esteemed, and is considered by many to be the best juvenile paper in the world. It is a most appropriate present for boys and girls.” [Chicago Tribune 18 Dec 1866] The President was Andrew Johnson.

• Less kindly was the attention given by a New Orleans paper, which castigated the Corporal for a “sacrilegious element,” a “hypocritical pious style that affects a familiarity with Deity.” The example given is an anecdote of a child’s clever saying. [Times-Democrat 10 July 1868]

• In June 1869, the magazine announced that it had absorbed The Little Pilgrim: “ … The Little Pilgrim has enlisted in The Little Corporal’s army. … The Little Pilgrim in coming to his western home readily joins The Little Corporal’s army, and becomes an Aid. Private Queer resigns the position he has so honorably filled, and in the July No. The Little Pilgrim will take his place and thereafter bear the knapsack. … Three cheers for ‘The Little Pilgrim’s Knapsack,’ and three times three for The Little Pilgrim himself.” [8 (June 1869); p. 92] With the July 1869 issue, the illustration at the head of the puzzles column was changed to show the Pilgrim and the Private working together; the union was acknowledged by a charming little scene: “ ‘Good morning, my dear Pilgrim,’ said Private Queer, as he met the young traveler at the depot in Chicago, after his long ride from Philadelphia. ‘Allow me to carry your knapsack to the carriage, sir. … I am very glad to see you looking so well, sir.’ The Private said all this very rapidly, before the Pilgrim had time to speak, and, indeed, he was a little taken by surprise by the heartiness of the young soldier’s reception, for, in the staid old Quaker city he had been used to deliberation and quiet dignity. He felt sure, however, that the young stranger was a friend, and in a moment grasped his hand warmly and returned his salutation ….” [9 (July 1869); p. 16] In Jan 1870, the Corporal’s cover changed to include the new “recruit”. By July 1870, the Pilgrim was gone from both cover and puzzle column.

• In absorbing The Little Pilgrim, the Corporal invited other editors to yield up their own periodicals: “What one among the Juvenile Magazines will be first to follow ‘The Little Pilgrim’s’ example in enlisting under The Corporal’s banner? There are more than two or three of the Juvenile Magazines that are bringing small gain to their publishers, and some are causing heavy loss. The field of literature is, to many, an inviting one. Many have been tempted to begin literary, and especially juvenile periodicals, and have learned, when too late, that it was not all plain sailing, and that to finally succeed requires a great deal of hard work and a great deal of money, and many other things besides work and money. To all these we say: Come in out of the storm. The Corporal’s tent is high and wide. We can make room for you. Don’t wait for another invitation. Come join our conquering army. … In plain English, we are ready to receive proposals to buy out other Juvenile Magazines and supply their outstanding circulation with numbers of The Little Corporal.” [“Who Comes Next?” 8 (June 1869: 92]

• In July 1870, the page size was reduced, the number of pages was doubled, and the cover was changed: “Our readers will notice the enlargement and change in shape of our magazine. We dislike ever to make any change in form, but, while for five years we have prospered and been very happy in the old shape, we have often felt that smaller pages would be much more convenient, and can but feel glad that the change is now made.” [11 (July 1870); p. 26] The Corporal’s “new suit”; is reflected in the frontispiece for the July issue, “The New Suit,” featuring a five-year-old boy (the Corporal had been published for five years) proudly showing off new clothes; the frontispiece is described on page 28.

• Editors advertised the format change in 1870 by sending “editors’ editions” of the magazine “to the editors of between 4,000 and 5,000 American newspapers and magazines.” Enclosed was a description of the periodical: “We have worked hard to establish on a firm basis a national, first-class, original, juvenile magazine, that should be thoroughly American, and an honor and benefit to America and the American Children …. We believe the ideal juvenile magazine should be of equal interest and profit to PARENTS AND CHILDREN—NOT CHILDISH but childlike.” The enclosure included a sample notice for editors to use, despite the fact that “we prefer a good, independent notice”; the sample plays off one of Napoleon Bonaparte’s nicknames and is … flattering: “The wonderful growth of this young Napoleon of the juveniles has been as surprising as it is interesting. Its circulation has shot far ahead of that of any of its competitors. Its matter is entirely original and of a very high order. The freshness and vivacity of its pages cause the eyes of all our young people to sparkle. In its new, improved form it is one of the handsomest, as it is the cheapest, magazine we have ever seen.” [11 (July 1870): enclosure]

• In 1871, the publisher’s offices were destroyed by the Chicago Fire: “In the great conflagration of October 8 and 9, which laid waste the entire business part of the city of Chicago, The Little Corporal Publishing House was also destroyed, with all its contents, including all our printing material, presses, electrotype plates; all the back numbers on hand from the commencement of the Corporal down to the number for November, which was all ready and partly printed.” [13 (Nov 1871); p. 1] In place of a Nov issue, subscribers were sent a single sheet folded into eight pages and headed “SUPPLEMENT NUMBER FOR NOVEMBER, 1871”: “We send you this sheet to inform you of our great calamity, and to make known our plans for the future, and to ask you to continue your aid now, in a time of great need. The many thousands of the friends of The Little Corporal will surely not forsake us now, but will, we trust, all send in their names for next year, accompanied by others, so that instead of our list falling off it shall be greatly increased. We have, both editor and publisher, just as brave hearts and willing hands for this good work as ever before, and all that we ask is that our friends will stand by us now, and The Little Corporal shall rise from the ashes, stronger, better, and more attractive than ever.” [13 (Nov 1871); p. 1]

• Since subscribers didn’t receive their usual issue, the next one would have to make up for it: “Notwithstanding this terrible Baptism of Fire, the Little Corporal STILL LIVES, and the number for December will appear early in November, more charming and brilliant than ever. … It will be extra large, containing about double the usual number of pages, so as to make up to our readers partly for the loss of the November number.” [13 (Nov 1871); p. 1] The Dec 1871 issue was 48 pages and featured a frontispiece by Thomas Nast, of the Little Corporal rising from the ruins.

• Other editors were sympathetic: “That awful Chicago fire, of which we shall never know the severity, but of which we shall never tire of hearing, ‘scorched’ one of the brightest of the juvenile magazines, the Little Corporal; but, we are glad to know, only scorched it, and that it will come out again in a few weeks as before. Let the children everywhere give it a helping hand by at once sending on payments for another year. Don’t leave it for some other juvenile not burnt out, but help it all you can.” [“Editor’s Table.” Maine Farmer]

Work and Play was absorbed by the Corporal in 1872, as announced in the April issue: “By an arrangement made with the publishers, Milton Bradley & Co., Springfield, Mass., the publication of [Work and Play] will hereafter be discontinued, and its subscribers will be supplied with the Little Corporal for the unexpired term of their subscription.” [14 (April 1872); p. 154] The puzzles column was titled “Work and Play” beginning with the May 1872 issue.

• The Corporal’s absorption by St. Nicholas made for some ferocious wordplay and a realization that one magazine had taken the field. “That voracious young giant, ‘St. Nicholas,’ has now swallowed ‘The Schoolday Magazine’ of Philadelphia, … and also ‘The Little Corporal,’ ” announced the Boston Globe. [5 April 1875] “ ‘St. Nicholas,’ Scribner’s children’s magazine, should be called the Great American Gobbler,” the Minneapolis Tribune pointed out. “During its brief career it has managed to swallow ‘The Little Corporal,’ ‘The Schoolday magazine,’ ‘Our Young Folks,’ ‘The Riverside,’ and ‘The Children’s Hour.’ these were all flourishing juvenile magazines, each good in its way, and each catering to a large number of readers. But in walks St. Nicholas, entertaining more progressive ideas regarding juvenile literature, its pages crammed with the stories and pictures which the little folks wanted, and soon took the place of the others. St. Nicholas, to prevent their untimely death, quietly swallowed the entire batch. Some of them will be missed, but the new and popular favorite is such an excellent magazine, apparently combining the merits of all the lamented deceased, that we fear they will be but briefly mourned and speedily forgotten.” [24 April 1875] “This pretty much clears the field,” the Lawrence Daily Journal pointed out. [25 April 1875] The Cecil Whig allowed that ‘[t]his absorption of rivals might make St. Nicholas a ‘dangeorus monopoly,’ but that its proprietors may be thoroughly trusted to give the most interesting articles that can be obtained for money.” [24 April 1875] Advertisements for St. Nicholas emphasize that the absorbed magazines were “merging into St. Nicholas their most attractive features and their subscription lists.”

• The “entire outfit” of the Corporal was sold at a Constable’s Sale on 12 April 1875; the details provide a list of the necessities of publishing a children’s magazine: “Constable’s Sale on two Executions. The entire outfit of the ‘Little Corporal,’ consisting of numerous fonts of type, cases, presses, stands, furniture, galleys, etc., together with a large stock of Bibles, Books, Chromos, Steel-Engravings, Picture-Frames, Chairs, Stoves, Desks, Safes (Hall’s), Tables. Lounges, and Office Furniture generally. A splendid assortment of original Wood-Cuts and Electrotypes of a juvenile character, suitable for any publication of the character of the ‘Little Corporal.’ ” [“A Rare Chance”]

absorbed: The Little Pilgrim ; Oct 1853-April 1869 • Work and Play ; Jan 1870-March 1872

absorbed by: St. Nicholas ; Nov 1873-Feb 1940, 1943

source of information: July 1865-Dec 1874 bound volumes and scattered issues; Kelly

available: AASHistPer, series 4 & 5

• excerpts in Lessons of War: The Civil War in Children’s Magazines, ed. James Marten. Wilmington, Delaware: Scholarly Resources, 1998.

excerpts online

bibliography:

• “The Little Corporal.” The Evansville Daily Journal [Evansville, Indiana] 4 July 1865; p. 2.

• “The Child’s Paper.” Racine Journal [Racine, Wisconsin] 25 July 1865; p. 3.

• “The 8th Wisconsin War Eagle.” Appleton Post [Appleton, Wisconsin] 27 July 1865; p. 1. Also, Wyandotte Commercial Gazette [Kansas City, Kansas] 29 July 1865; p. 2. Also, St. Joseph Saturday Herald [St. Joseph, Michigan] 29 July 1865; p. 2.

• “The Little Corporal.” St. Cloud Democrat [St. Cloud, Minnesota] 3 Aug 1865; p. 3.

• The Little Corporal is the title. The Berkshire County Eagle [Pittsfield, Massachusetts] 10 Aug 1865; p. 2.

• “The Little Corporal.” Vermont Christian Messenger [Montpelier, Vermont] 10 Aug 1865; p. 2.

• “The Little Corporal.” Vermont Watchman and State Journal [Montpelier, Vermont] 18 Aug 1865; p. 2.

• “The Little Corporal.” Burlington Daily Times [Burlington, Vermont] 23 Aug 1865; p. 2.

• “The Little Corporal.” Raftsman’s Journal [Cleafield, Pennsylvania] 23 Aug 1865; p. 3.

• “A New Paper for Children.” Pittston Gazette [Pittston, Pennsylvania] 24 Aug 1865; p. 2.

• “The Little Corporal.” The Star and Enterprise [Newville, Pennsylvania] 26 Aug 1865; p. 2.

• “The Little Corporal.” The Daily Evening Express [Lancaster, Pennsylvania] 4 Sept 1865; p. 2.

• “What Newspapers to Take.” The St. Johnsbury Caledonian [St. Johnsbury, Vermont] 15 Dec 1865; p. 2.

• “Success of Western Enterprise.” Cedar Falls Gazette [Cedar Falls, Iowa] 22 Dec 1865; p. 2.

• notice. The New-London Chronicle [New London, Connecticut] 17 March 1866; p. 2.

• “A Sensation.” Chicago Tribune [Chicago, Illinois] 4 April 1866; p. 4.

• “The Little Corporal.” The Highland Weeklly News [Hillsboro, Ohio] 7 June 1866; p. 3.

• “Struck a Lead.” The Weekly News-Democrat [Emporia, Kansas] 16 June 1866; p. 2.

• “Art in the West.” Chicago Tribune [Chicago, Illinois] 13 Nov 1866; p. 4.

• “The Little Corporal.” Alton Weekly Telegraph [Alton, Illinois] 23 Nov 1866; p. 1.

• The President of the United States. Chicago Tribune [Chicago, Illinois] 18 Dec 1866; p. 4.

• notice. The States and Union [Ashland, Ohio] 26 Dec 1866; p. 3.

• notice of Feb issue. The Enterprise and Vermonter [Vergennes, Vermont] 15 Feb 1867; p. 2.

• notice. The Wyandot Pioneer [Upper Sandusky, Ohio] 11 July 1867; p. 3.

• ”Periodicals for August.” The Evansville Daily Journal [Evansville, Indiana] 27 July 1867; p. 4.

• “Alfred L. Sewell.” American Phrenological Journal 46 (Oct 1867); pp. 134-135.

• Some of our Northern exchanges. The Times-Democrat [New Orleans, Louisiana] 10 July 1868; p. 4.

• notice. The Woodstock Sentinel [Woodstock, Illinois] 22 Oct 1868; p. 2.

• “Children’s Magazines.” The St. Johnsbury Caledonian [St. Johnsbury, Vermont] 13 Nov 1868; p. 2.

• “Our Chicago Letter.” The Leavenworth Bulletin [Leavenworth, Kansas] 14 Nov 1868; p. 1.

Geo. P. Rowell & Co’s American Newspaper Directory. New York: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1869; p. 21. [archive.org]

• notice of Feb issue. Fort Wayne Daily Gazette [Fort Wayne, Indiana] 30 Jan 1869; p. 4.

• “Our New Firm.” Little Corporal 8 (Feb 1869); pp. 30-31.

• Grace Greenwood has sold. Richmond Weekly Palladium [Richmond, Indiana] 25 May 1869; p. 2.

• “Juvenile Magazines.” Buffalo Morning Express and Illustrated Buffalo Express [Buffalo, New York] 28 May 1869; p. 2.

• notice of July issue. Ashtabula Weekly Telegraph [Ashtabula, Ohio] 3 July 1869; p. 3.

• notice of Dec issue. The Daily Evening Express [Lancaster, Pennsylvania] 3 Dec 1869; p. 2.

The Men Who Advertise. New York: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1870; p. 634. [google books]

• “Magazines for the Young.” Massachusetts Teacher and Journal of Home and School Education 23 (Jan 1870); p. 38.

• B. “Chicago Correspondence.” The Weekly Republican [Plymouth, Indiana] 22 Dec 1870; p. 4.

• “Editors’ Edition.” Little Corporal 11 (July 1870): enclosure.

• “Our Book Table.” The Leavenworth Times [Leavenworth, Kansas] 25 Dec 1870; p. 2.

• notice. Christian World 22 (Jan 1871); p. 28.

• “Literary Notices.” The St. Cloud Journal [St. Cloud, Minnesota] 2 Feb 1871; p. 2.

• “The Little Corporal for June.” Wood County Reporter [Grand Rapids, Wisconsin] 25 May 1871; p. 3.

• notice. Christian World 22 (June 1871); p. 207.

• “Twins.” The Eaton Democrat [Eaton, Ohio] 29 June 1871; p. 3.

• “In and About Chicago.” Wisconsin State Journal [Madison, Wisconsin] 28 Aug 1871; p. 2.

• “The Chicago Calamity.” Brooklyn Daily Eagle [Brooklyn, New York] 10 Oct 1871; p. 2.

• “The Sufferers.” The Chicago Tribune [Chicago, Illinois] 13 Oct 1871; p. 2.

• “Editor’s Table.” Maine Farmer 39 (18 Nov 1871); p. 2.

• “Literary Notices.” For Everybody [Buffalo, New York] 1 Dec 1871; p. 15.

Geo. P. Rowell & Co.’s American Newspaper Directory. New York: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1872; pp. 31-32. [archive.org]

• “The Magazines, Etc.: Little Corporal.” The Advance 5 (8 Feb 1872); p. 6.)

• “Periodical Literature.” Chicago Tribune [Chicago, Illinois] 27 March 1872; p. 4.

• “Teachers Institute.” La Cygne Journal [La Cygne, Kansas] 4 May 1872; p. 2.

• notice. Christian World 23 (June 1872); p. 199.

• advertisement. Sioux City Journal [Sioux City, Iowa] 17 Dec 1872; p. 3.

• “Literary Notes.” The Boston Globe [Boston, Massachusetts] 5 April 1875; p. 2.

• “The Little Corporal.” Chicago Tribune [Chicago, Illinois] 6 April 1875; p. 8.

• “Consolidation of Magazines.” Green-Mountain Freeman [Montpelier, Vermont] 7 April 1875; p. 2.

• “A Rare Chance for Bargains at 164 East Randolph-st., Rooms 14 and 15.” Chicago Tribune [Chicago, Illinois] 11 April 1875; p. 15.

• Scribner & Co. are still at work. Middlebury Register [Middlebury, Vermont] 13 April 1875; p. 3.

• advertisement for St. Nicholas. The Cincinnati Enquirer [Cincinnati, Ohio] 20 April 1875; p. 5. Also, Chicago Tribune [Chicago, Illinois] 20 April 1875; p. 7.

• Scribner’s Magazine counts ten. The Cecil Whig [Elkton, Maryland] 24 April 1875; p. 3.

• St. Nicholas. Minneapolis Tribune [Minneapolis, Minnesota] 24 April 1875; p. 2.

• St. Nicholas for May. Lawrence Daily Journal [Lawrence, Kansas] 25 April 1875; p. 2.

• Herbert E. Fleming. Magazines of a Market-Metropolis. PhD diss. University of Chicago, 1906; pp. 404-405. [google books]

• Anna Morgan. My Chicago. Chicago: Ralph Fletcher Seymour, 1916; p. 172. [google books]

• Herbert E. Fleming. Magazines of a Market-Metropolis. PhD diss. University of Chicago, 1906; pp. 404-406. [google books]

• Betty Longenecker Lyon. “A History of Children’s Secular Magazines Published in the United States from 1789-1899.” PhD diss. Johns Hopkins, 1942; pp. 242, 245, 277-280, 294, 312, 318.

Children’s Periodicals of the United States, ed. R. Gordon Kelly. Westport, Connecticut & London, England: Greenwood Press, 1984.

• Gillian Avery. Behold the Child: American Children and Their Books, 1621-1922. Baltimore, Maryland: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1994; p. 148.

• James Marten. “For the Good, the True, and the Beautiful: Northern Children’s Magazines and the Civil War.” Civil War History 41 (March 1995); pp. 57-75.

Lessons of War: The Civil War in Children’s Magazines, ed. James Marten. Wilmington, Delaware: Scholarly Resources, 1998.

Our Friend ; 25 Dec 1865-1906?

edited by: Paul F. de Gournay (also, P. F. de Gournay; P. F. deGournay)

published: Montgomery, Alabama: Paul F. de Gournay; 1865, publisher at 25 Court St., “up stairs”

frequency: semimonthly

description: 1865: 16 pp.; page size, 11.25″ h. Prices: issue #1, free; $3/ year

• Issue #4 is April 1866

relevant quotes:

• “Our Friend.—This name will, of itself, arrest attention. Coupled as it is, with that of a distinguished and elegant Southern writer, it cannot fail to excite the interest of all persons who have at heart the proper training of the minds of our youth. Col. P. F. de Gournay … proposes to publish, on the 25th December, and semi-monthly thereafter, a magazine devoted to the improvement of youth under the title given above. The subscription price is put at three dollars a year; which none but the most miserly will hesitate to pay most cheerfully. There is no reason why this magazine should not rival in the number of its subscribers, as it certainly will excel in the variety and scope of its matter, the famous stories of ‘Peter Parley.’ ” [“Our Friend.” The Montgomery Advertiser 19 Nov 1865]

• “A most appropriate Christmas present greeted the people of Montgomery on Monday in the shape of a neatly arranged and tastefully filled paper …. Col. de Gournay has labored under many disadvantages, but has in spite of them gotten up a paper which commends itself to every family in Alabama. A journal for youth, it yet contains much food for reflection for older people and will prove a valuable ‘friend’ indeed in every home circle.” [“Our Friend.” Montgomery Advertiser 27 Dec 1865]

• As was traditional for Southern publications, at least one editor noted that the Friend was safely regional: “We have looked over the sixteen broad pages of reading matter the first number contains, and can cordially recommend it to those of our readers who wish their little ones ot read nothing deleterious; to read what will instruct, improve and amuse; and which, edited by one ‘to the manner born,’ will be more apt to have matter of interest to the young folks of the South.” [“Our Friend.” The Times-Picayune]

• “Among the evidences of healthy recuperation in the South, we notice the announcement of a semi-monthly periodical to be published at Montgomery, Ala., and to be entitled ‘Our Friend.’ It is designed chiefly for youth, and will contain select passages from the best authors, ‘original or translated,’ anecdotes of eminent personages, and other matter calculated to foster a love for ‘the great, the good, and the beautiful.’ It will not aim ‘to educate,’ but to awaken a thirst for knowledge.” [notice]

source of information: OCLC; notices, etc., below

available: AASHistPer, series 5 (one 1876 issue)

bibliography:

• prospectus. Montgomery Mail [Montgomery, Alabama] 14 Nov 1865.

• “Alabama Intelligence.” The Mobile Daily Times [Mobile, Alabama] 16 Nov 1865; p. 4.

• “Our Friend.” The Montgomery Advertiser [Montgomery, Alabama] 19 Nov 1865; p. 3.

• “Our Friend.” Montgomery Daily Mail [Montgomery, Alabama] 27 Dec 1865; p. 2.

• “Our Friend.” The Montgomery Advertiser [Montgomery, Alabama] 27 Dec 1865; p. 3. Two pieces side-by-side.

• “Our Friend.” The Times-Picayune [New Orleans, Louisiana] 30 Dec 1865; p. 1.

• notice. The Round Table 3 (17 March 1866); p. 166.

• Major DeGournay. The Richmond Times [Richmond, Virginia] 12 March 1866; p. 8.

• “Books Received.” The Crescent Monthly 1 (April 1866); p. 84.

The Youth’s Friend ; Jan 1866

edited by: J. P. Berry

published: Portland, Maine: Brown Thurston

relevant information:

• proposed; perhaps not published

• Thurston’s intention to publish the magazine was announced in Nov 1865.

relevant quote: “We have received the prospectus of a new children’s magazine, similar to ‘Our Young Folks,’ the first number of which will be published in January. It is to be called ‘The Youth’s Friend’ and will be under the editorial management of Mr. J. P. Berry, and published by Brown Thurston, Portland.” [“Editor’s Table”]

source of information: Maine Farmer

bibliography:

• notice. Daily Eastern Argus 33 (30 Nov 1865); p. 3.

• “Editor’s Table.” Maine Farmer 33 (7 Dec 1865); p. 2.

The Juvenile Instructor ; 1 Jan 1866-1929 • The Instructor ; 1930-1970 • The New Era 1971-present

cover/masthead: 1866 | 1867 | 1868-1872

edited by: 1 Jan 1866-April 1901, George Quayle Cannon

• May-Oct 1901, Lorenzo Snow

• Nov 1901-Nov 1918, Joseph F. Smith

• Dec 1918-June 1945, Heber J. Grant

• July 1945-April 1951, George Albert Smith

• July 1945-Dec 1949, Milton Bennion

• Jan 1950-Sept 1951, George R. Hill

• May 1951-Dec 1970, David O. McKay

• Jan 1971-March 1976, Doyle L. Green

• April 1976-July 1978, Dean L. Larsen

• Aug 1978-March 1979, James E. Faust

• April 1979-, M. Russell Ballard

published: Salt Lake City, Utah Territory: George Q. Cannon, 1866-1901.

• Salt Lake City, Utah: Deseret Sunday School Union, 1901-1970.

• Salt Lake City, Utah: Corporation of the Present of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints, 1970-.

frequency: 1866-1907, semimonthly: Saturday; 1 vol/ year

description: 1866, 4 pp.; size, 15.5″ h x 10.5″ w • 1867-1872, 8 pp.; size, 11.5″ h x 8.5″ w

• Price: 1868-1870, $3; 1871-1872, $2.50: “In order that [the paper] may meet with still wider circulation, and be read in every household in the Territory, we shall publish the forthcoming volume [in 1871] at the reduced price of $2,50, and where cash is paid, in advance, will make a discount. … With the present number of subscribers, and at the proposed reduced rate, the Juvenile Instructor will be published at a loss to the editor; but we hope that this will be made up by an increase of subscribers. Admitting advertisements would be enable us to publish it at a lower rate; but they would be unsuitable, we think, for its columns, and, therefore have never thought of inserting them.” [“Editorial Thoughts.” 5 (24 Dec 1870); p. 204.]

• No issues for Dec 1871, due to difficulty in getting paper [Deseret News 21 Feb 1872]

• 1870-1872: “Grain brought to this City for the Juvenile Instructor will be received at the office of our paper—Deseret News Building.” [5 (8 Jan 1870); p. 8.]

• Vol 1-105 (1866-1970); new series, vol 1- (1971-)

• Circulation: 1868, 3,000/ month

• Religious focus: Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints

relevant information:

• The Instructor was intended to educate children in Utah Territory, which led Cannon to focus on a variety of subjects. He often addressed the “children of the Territory,” especially when introducing a topic that might be unfamiliar to those born in the area (opossums, for example).

• Because the format of the Instructor changed for 1867, the first issue wasn’t published until Jan 15; it was, however, dated Jan 1.

• The Deseret News occasionally printed the contents: for the 13 April 1870 issue [13 April 1870]; for vol 5 #3 [30 April 1870]; for the 4 May 1870 issue [4 May 1870]; for a June 1870 issue [8 June 1870]; for the 23 Nov 1870 issue [23 Nov 1870]; for the 17 May 1871 issue [17 May 1871].

relevant quotes:

• The original plan for the Instructor promised much, but took into account realities of publishing in Utah Territory; from the prospectus: “The necessity of a periodical adapted to and written expressly for children, is one that has been deeply felt for some time by many of our citizens,—a publication suitable for circulation among the Latter-day Saints, through the columns of which their children can learn doctrine and principle placed beofre them in a simplified form, and gain knowledge on a variety of useful and interesting subjects. After consultation with President Brigham Young, and with his sanction, it is purposed to publish, on or about the 15th of October, the first number of the Juvenile Instructor, an Illustrated Semi-Monthly Periodical, of a size suitable for preserving and binding, containing four pages of matter, original and selected, of interest and value to the young. The matter will comprise short articles on a variety of subjects designed to inspire a taste for valuable reading and present before the young mind rudimental knowledge of various kinds in a manner easy to be understood, as well as contributions from juvenile and other correspondents, answers to questions, etc., etc. Each number will be illustrated with engravings procured expressly for the Juvenile Instructor. Altogether it is designed to be a useful auxiliary in the education of children, whether in our Sunday or Day Schools or in the family circle. After a careful calculation the price has been placed at three dollars per year, coin rates, to be paid in advance, as no allowance has been made for losses through non-payment of subscriptions. To clubs of ten or a greater number of subscribers a reduction of ten per cent. will be made. Cash, or produce at market prices in coin delivered in this city, taken in payment. … The value of a paper of this kind to the rising generation, when rightly conducted, need not be urged,—it is self-evident. Bishops, School Teachers and Parents are respectfully invited to co-operate and lend their assistance in circulating this Prospectus and procuring subscribers. Produce can be delivered at W. S. Godbe’s Branch Drug Store, East Temple Street.” [Deseret News 13 Sept 1865]

• The Instructor’s focus on education was evident from the beginning: “There does not exist a single reason, that we can perceive, why there should not be a well-supported and extensively circulated first-class child’s paper published here. No other community, with which we are acquainted, indulge in such high hopes respecting their young as do the inhabitants of this Territory. The most sanguine expectations are entertained in relation to the great future which awaits them. It is very natural that this should be so; for unto us are the promises made. But to have these hopes and expectations gratified, steps should be taken to train our children and do all in our power to prepare them for the duties that will devolve upon them. It is to aid in this work and to supply a want which has been long felt to exist that the publication of this paper has been undertaken.” [“Salutatory.” 1 (1 Jan 1866): 3.]

• Besides the usual difficulties of publishing a semimonthly paper, Cannon dealt with frustrations due to the fact that editorial details had to be accomplished from a distance: paper and engravings were usually sent from the East. The engraving at the head of the paper beginning in 1868 originally was to be used in 1867. In Jan 1867, Cannon explained to subscribers why they hadn’t yet received their papers: “We expected … to have been able to have published the First Number on the 15th of this month. We sent a drawing of a new head for the Juvenile Instructor to New York to be engraved; and we expected to have received the engraving in time to have used it in the first number on the 15th instant; but we have been disappointed. We are informed by letter that it will not be likely to reach here before the 12th of February. Shout it reach about that time, we hope that we will be able to issue the First Number by the 15th of February. We regret this delay exceedingly, and feel much disappointed at it ….” [George Q. Cannon] When the engraving finally arrived, it was incorrect and had to be redone; it wasn’t used until 1868: “At last we have obtained an engraving for the head of our little paper. Last winter Brother George J. Taylor kindly made us a drawing for a head, which we sent East to have engraved. In doing so we went to considerable expense, but, to our great disappointment, when the engraving came to hand we found it much too large for our purpose. It was a fine specimen of engraving; but the engraver had neglected to observe our letter respecting the size, and it was useless. The present engraving is home-manufacture. The drawing was made by Brother George J. Taylor, the plate (brass) was prepared and mounted by Brother Z. Derrick, and the engraving was done by Brother David McKenzie. We are convinced that our readers will join with us in thinking it a very creditable piece of workmanship. We are under many obligations to these brethren for their courtesy, and the trouble they have been at to gratify us in getting up this engraving.” [“Editorial Thoughts.” 3 (1 Jan 1868); p. 4.]

• Most elements came from the East, including illustrations: “The publisher has lately received a number of new engravings from the east, illustrative of interesting topics which will gladden the hearts of the Instructor’s young subscribers.” [Deseret News 16 Nov 1870]

• Paper also came from the East, which could make for difficulties in publishing: “In answer to the many inquiries concerning the non-appearance of the Juvenile Instructor, of late, we are requested to state that the paper ordered for it from the east, for some reason has not come to hand, most likely owing to the blockade on the U. P. R. R. [Union Pacific Rail Road] The type is already up for the numbers due; and as soon as the paper arrives, it will be issued with all possible haste, till it is again up to date.” [Deseret News 27 Dec 1871] Weather had combined with a misdirected letter to ensure that the Instructor didn’t appear on time, as explained in Feb 1872: “There is every prospect now that this favorite among the juvenile population of the Territory will henceforth be issued with regularity. The delay which has occurred during the past few weeks, has no doubt been annoying to the subscribers, but, owing to the blockade of the road, it has been utterly unavoidable. The paper upon which the Juvenile Instructor is printed is of a finer quality than can be manufactured in the Territory, it must be so on account of the engravings, and consequently has to be imported from the east. Last October an order was sent east for a supply of paper, with the expectation, and there was then every prospect of it, that it would be received in time to continue the regular semi-monthly issue; but the letter miscarried, and the order was not filled. When the paper manufacturers east were again written to, the paper was forwarded, but it was caught in the blockade, and is still detained at some point between this city and Omaha. Paper has since been procured from California, and as type for two or three numbers of the paper was set before the arrival of the paper, the numbers will now be issued as rapidly as possible until up to date, and then regularly afterwards. The delay has been annoying, but to none so much as to the editor, and as the subscribers will see that it has been unavoidable, he hopes this explanation of the cause of it will be satisfactory, and that his young readers will regard it as a sufficient excuse therefor. [sic]” [Deseret News 21 Feb 1872] There were, in fact, no issues for Dec 1871. The first three issue for 1872 appeared Jan 13; the second issue, Jan 20.

• An Ogden newspaper was admiring: “It is written in a plain easy style, printed on good paper and contains a vast fund of information on various matters. Church and secular History, both ancient and modern; Inventions and Discoveries; Travels and Adventures; Science and Art; Natural History and Philosophy, and many other useful and interesting subjects are treated in a familiar and comprehensive manner, and illustrated by engravings, which always please the juvenile mind and have great effect in clinching upon the understanding the instruction introduced by the text. While the paper is published for the special benefit of the rising generation, it may be profitably perused by the ‘oldest man in the mountains.’ ” [Ogden Junction 16 Feb 1870]

• A history of the LDS Church appeared in 1871: “No. 1, Vol. 6, of the Juvenile Instructor is issued this day, and it is full of splendid reading matter for the young. The history of the Prophet Joseph is now concluded, or rather merges into general church history,—which will be continued, and will include biographical sketches of President Brigham young, and other prominent men in the Church, together with the movements of the Saints from Nauvoo onward, and will form the most complete compendium of Church history extant when completed.” [Deseret News 22 Feb 1871]

source of information: 1870-1872 bound vols; archive.org; OCLC; articles, etc., below

available: archive.org

• AASHistPer, series 5

bibliography:

• “The Juvenile Instructor.” The Deseret News [Salt Lake City, Utah] 13 Sept 1865; p. 396.

• “The Juvenile Instructor.” The Deseret News [Salt Lake City, Utah] 8 June 1870; p. 5.

• “Good for All.” The Ogden Junction [Ogden, Utah] 10 Sept 1870; p. 2.

• George Q. Cannon. “To the Patrons of the ‘Juvenile Instructor’ Throughout the Territory.” The Deseret News [Salt Lake City, Utah] 30 Jan 1867; p. 5.

• “An Answer.” Deseret Evening News [Salt Lake City, Utah] 25 Nov 1868; p. 4.

L. P. Fisher’s Advertisers’ Guide [for the Pacific Coast]. San Francisco, California: L. P. Fisher, 1870; p. 114. [archive.org]

• “The Juvenile Instructor.” The Deseret News [Salt Lake City, Utah] 26 Jan 1870; p. 10.

• “The Juvenile Instructor.” The Ogden Junction [Ogden, Utah] 16 Feb 1870; p. 2.

• “The Juvenile Instructor.” The Deseret News [Salt Lake City, Utah] 13 April 1870; p. 5.

• “The Juvenile Instructor.” The Deseret News [Salt Lake City, Utah] 30 April 1870; p. 3.

• “Juvenile Instructor.” The Deseret News [Salt Lake City, Utah] 20 April 1870; p. 5.

• “The Juvenile Instructor.” The Deseret News [Salt Lake City, Utah] 4 May 1870; p. 5.

• “The Juvenile Instructor.” The Deseret News [Salt Lake City, Utah] 16 Nov 1870; p. 5.

• “The Juvenile Instructor.” The Deseret News [Salt Lake City, Utah] 23 Nov 1870; p. 8.

• “Juvenile Instructor.” The Deseret News [Salt Lake City, Utah] 22 Feb 1871; p. 8.

• “In a New Dress.” The Deseret News [Salt Lake City, Utah] 17 May 1871; p. 10.

• “The Juvenile Instructor.” The Deseret News [Salt Lake City, Utah] 27 Dec 1871; p. 1.

Geo. P. Rowell & Co.’s American Newspaper Directory. New York: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1872; p. 190. [archive.org]

• “The Juvenile Instructor.” The Deseret News [Salt Lake City, Utah] 21 Feb 1872; p. 3.

• Eleanor Weakley Nolen. “Nineteenth Century Children’s Magazines.” The Horn Book Magazine. 15 (Jan/Feb 1939); pp. 55-60.

• Carolyn J. Bauer and Sharon P. Muir. “Visions, Saints and Zion: Children’s Literature of the Mormon Movement.” Phaedrus 7 (Spring/Summer 1980); p. 32.

Children’s Periodicals of the United States, ed. R. Gordon Kelly. Westport, Connecticut & London, England: Greenwood Press, 1984.

Little Bouquet (also Little Bouquets) ; 15 May 1866-Aug 1867 • The Lyceum Banner ; 1 Sept 1867-July 1872 • Little Bouquet ; 15 May 1873-after Dec 1876

cover/masthead: 1867-1869 | 1872

edited by: 1 Sept 1867-March 1872, Mrs. H. R. M. Brown • 1869, E. T. Blackmer, Associate Editor • April 1870-1872, Lou H. Kimball

published: Chicago, Illinois: Religio-Philosophical Publishing Association, 1866-1867.

• Chicago, Illinois: Mrs. Lou H. Kimball, 1 Sept 1867-after 1872; 1867, publisher at 167 South Clark St.; 1869, publisher at Room 84, 137 Madison St.; 1872, publisher at 225 W. Randolph St. • Publisher is listed as Lou. H. Kimball and as Mrs. Lou H. Kimball.

• Chicago, Illinois: S. S. Jones, 15 May 1873.

frequency:

• The prospectus announced that it would be weekly

• 1866-1867, monthly; 1 vol/ year

• 1 Sept 1867-March 1870, semimonthly, Saturday; listed as a weekly in 1868 [“Chicago Periodicals.” Prairie Farmer 39 (25 July 1868); p. 28]

• 2 April 1870-1872, biweekly, Saturday

• May 1873-?, monthly

description:

• 1866-1867: page size, 14.5″ h

• 1 Sept 1867-March 1870: 12 pp.; page size, 9″ h; price, $1/ year

• 2 April 1870: 18 pp.

• 1872: 8 pp.; page size, 28″ h x 21″ w; price, $1

• 1873: 32 pp.; price, $1.50/ year

• Circulation: 1872, 3,000

• June 1866 is vol 1 #2

• Before 1871, the volume began with 1 Sept; with 1 Jan 1871, new volumes began in Jan

• Religious focus: Spiritualist

relevant information: Mrs. H. R. M. Brown (editor) and Mrs. Lou H. Kimball (publisher) were sisters.

• A notice of the Banner was written in shorthand in the Standard-Phonographic Visitor [4 (23 May 1870); p. 555].

• The Chicago Fire burned the Banner’s offices, the unmailed issue, and Mrs. Lou H. Kimball’s personal property; she was reported dead. She printed a supplement to the Banner to replace the burned issues, but it was lost by the express company. A “half sheet” was subsequently sent to subscribers. [American Spiritualist 4 (4 Nov 1871)] Kimball’s insurance company went bankrupt without paying her. [“Temporary Suspension of the Lyceum Banner.”] The Spiritualist printed information about donations to the Banner in a later issue.

• In 1873, the Banner appears on a list of periodicals which W. F. Jamieson considered dangerous to the American republic.

relevant quotes:

• The Banner of Light—a Spiritualist paper for adults—thoroughly described the first issue of the Bouquet: “The leading article is by Hudson Tuttle, Esq., entitled ‘The Pearl Diver of Ceylong;’ the next article, by A. J. Davis, Esq., (very brief) is headed ‘Children’s Progressive Lyceum;’ Poetry by Mrs. Emma Tuttle and Mrs. Harvey Jones. There is a Natural History Department, appropriately illustrated. The salutatory is very prettily worded and very appropriate. … If anything, the fifth and sixth pages are the most interesting, conveying as they do, by appropriate diagrams and explanations, a full and correct idea of the opening exercises of the Children’s Progressive Lyceum. The eighth page is occupied with a fine piece of original music (with words) composed expressively for the Bouquet by H. M. Higgins, Esq., of Chicago.” [19 (2 June 1866)].

• The editor of the Banner took a notice of the Bouquet as a chance to complain about taxes: “Some people complain that the price per single copy is too high; but all such should bear in mind that the cost of publishing periodicals has more than doubled since the war; that the tax on intelligence is enormous. Publishers of weekly newspapers will soon be starved out, if the U. S. internal revenue laws, so far as they (the publishers) are concerned, at least, are not altered, so as to give them a chance to live.” [19 (30 June 1866)]

• The change from Bouquet to Banner seems to have been quick: “A dear, old lady looked into our new office one day, and, looking about, she exclaimed, ‘Ah me! you change like the sparks that fly upward.’ We do not change exactly like the sparks, but, within ten days, we have changed our Bouquet for a Banner; changed printers press-men, offices; but we have not changed readers nor changed old friends for new. The changes have been from necessity, not from broken links in friendship’s silver chain. While we hope to retain old friends, we trust new ones will be added to our list, and that we shall go on rejoicingly to the end.” [“Changes.” 1 (1 Sept 1867); p. 9]

• The publisher’s description of the Banner was inclusive: “We teach no human creeds; Nature is our law-giver; to deal justly our religion. The children want Amusement, History, Romance, Music—the[y] want Moral, Mental and Physical culture. We hope to aid them in their search for these treasures.” [1 (1 Feb 1868); p. 162]

• On E. T. Blackmer as editor: “We are happy to announce that, with other improvements at the commencement of the new volume, we have added another name to the editorial corps. Mr. E. T. Blackmer, whose name has become so familiar to our readers from being connected with the musical department, has accepted the position of associate editor, and will hereafter be identified with the progress of the Lyceum Banner. He has for a long time been Musical Director of the Chicago Lyceum, and is an earnest, whole-souled worker in the Lyceum movement. Mr. Blackmer will visit many of the Lyceums in the Northwest during the coming autumn, and we bespeak for him a cordial welcome.” [“Notice.” 3 (15 Sept 1869); p. 26]

• Notices managed to praise the Banner without actually describing what the paper was about: “This excellent semi-monthly for young people is in its third year and must commend itself to all liberal minds as a Magazine worthy of their support. It is as much to be commended for that which it rejects, as for that which it makes use of; for shunning the monstrous and sensational style on the one hand, and the severely puritanical on the other, it finds a pleasant pathway between, along which it conducts its readers.” [Morning Republican]

• Years after the prospectus announced that the Bouquet would be weekly, the Banner was still trying: “It is the intention of the publisher to make the Lyceum Banner a weekly just as soon as possible …. The first volume of the new series will end with the present year, instead of Sept. 1st and a new volume will commence on the 1st of Jan. In order to give those who have not taken the paper an opportunity to become acquainted with it, we will send it to all NEW subscribers nine months, or, from the beginning of the new volume, until Jan. 1st, 1871 for fifty cents! We do this hoping that those who become acquainted with the Lyceum Banner, and through that with us, wll be glad to continue their subscriptions.” [Present Age 2 (26 March 1870); p. 2]

• Even as the Chicago Fire raged, the Banner’s publisher made plans for the future of the burned-out periodical: “The unconquerable Fire Fiend which has been raging for the last fifteen hours, over our beautiful city, is the only enemy to which we feel obliged to surrender, but this morning finds us without office, or roof of any kind for shelter, and nothing saved except what was hastily thrown on when informed that we had no time to lose if we would save ourselves. Office furniture, library, cuts, music plates, six hundred copies of ‘The Fairfields,’ just from the binders, the next edition of the LYCEUM BANNER, No. 21, ready for the mail, together with all the wardrobe of which we were possessed; all swept away with the destroying element that has made so many other homes a wreck. The publication of the Banner will be resumed as soon as we can replace, with new material, what has been burned. We hoped our many disappointed readers will be patient with the delay, and render us such aid as may be within their means, to assist us in again sending our Banner to the world. … The Banner still lives, but the fire is raging, and no one can foresee how much time must elapse before we can resume. Will our friends of the press aid us by making a notice of this in their columns?” [“ ‘Lyceum Banner’ Supplement.”] Thanking the editor of the Banner of Light, Mrs. Kimball was trying to be optimistic: “[T]hat you may never need the sympathy you give us, is my earnest prayer. I am a little, or, I might say, very much saddened, but not discouraged. No one can walk the desolate streets of our once beautiful city, and not feel heart sick. We will hope that good days are in store for us, but I heardly think those who passed through the fire can yet say it is well.” [Banner of Light 30 (11 Nov 1871); p. 4]

• Having endured years of editing, publishing, writing, and mailing the Banner, seven months after having the office and all she owned consumed in the Chicago Fire, Mrs. Kimball suspended the Banner for a few weeks while she negotiated with new publishers: “The Lyceum Banner will be suspended for a few weeks, until arrangements can be made with parties, with whom we are corresponding, to publish it, when we expect to retain our position as editor, without attending to the details of publishing.” [in “Temporary Suspension of the Lyceum Banner.”]

• The publishers of the revitalized periodical seem to have simply given up trying to make money with it: “We learn from the Religio-Philosophical Journal, that [The Little Bouquet] will be a monthly magazine, (usual magazine size, thirty-two pages of reading matter) with an illuminated cover of uncommon beauty. The whole work will be richly embellished with illustrative cuts, and replete with well written articles based upon the philosophy of life, and spiritual facts adapted to the tastes, capacity, mental and moral culture of the children and youth of the present age, both in and out of the sphere of Progressive Lyceums. This rare work, first of its kind ever brought before the public, will be put before the Spiritualists of the world at its actual cost—$1.50 a year. The proprietor of the Religio-Philosophical Publishing House is impelled to look to other means for sustaining his House than profits from this work. The object is to place the magazine in the hands of the children of all Spiritualists at least, in a form so attractive as to banish the prejudice that so generally prevails among the youth against the truth of spirit-communion.” [Banner of Light 32 (19 Oct 1872)]

source of information: OCLC; AASHistPer; notices and articles listed below; Lyon

available: AASHistPer, series 5

• 1867-1869, google books

bibliography:

• “The Little Bouquet.” Banner of Light 19 (28 April 1866); p. 5.

• Prospectus. Banner of Light 19 (28 April 1866); p. 5.

• “The Little Bouquet.” Banner of Light 19 (19 May 1866); p. 4.

• “The Little Bouquet.” Banner of Light 19 (2 June 1866); p. 4.

• “The Little Bouquet.” Banner of Light 19 (16 June 1866); p. 4.

• “The Little Bouquet.” Banner of Light 19 (30 June 1866); p. 4.

• “The Little Bouquet.” Banner of Light 19 (4 Aug 1866); p. 4.

• “The Little Bouquet.” Banner of Light 20 (6 Oct 1866); p. 4.

• “The Little Bouquet.” Banner of Light 20 (8 Dec 1866); p. 4.

• “The Little Bouquet.” Banner of Light 20 (16 Feb 1867); p. 4.

• “The Little Bouquet.” Banner of Light 21 (4 May 1867); p. 4.

• notice. New Orleans Tribune [New Orleans, Louisiana] 23 June 1867; p. 4.

• “The Little Bouquet.” Banner of Light 21 (27 July 1867); p. 8.

• “The Little Bouquet.” Banner of Light 21 (24 Aug 1867); p. 4.

• “The Lyceum Banner.” Banner of Light 21 (14 Sept 1867); p. 4.

• “Lyceum Banner.” Banner of Light 21 (14 Sept 1867); p. 4.

• “Lyceum Banner.” Banner of Light 22 (5 Oct 1867); p. 5.

• “The Lyceum Banner.” Banner of Light 23 (20 June 1868); p. 4.

• “The Lyceum Banner.” Banner of Light 23 (25 July 1868); p. 4.

• “Chicago Periodicals.” Prairie Farmer 39 (25 July 1868); p. 28.

• “The Lyceum Banner.” Banner of Light 23 (22 Aug 1868); p. 4.

• notice. The Children’s Friend (West Chester, Pennsylvania) 3 (Eleventh month 1868); p. 356. online

• “The Lyceum Banner.” American Spiritualist 2 (6 Nov 1869); p. 187.

• notice. Morning Republican [Little Rock, Arkansas] 10 March 1870; p. 4. Also Oregon State Journal 19 March 1870; p. 3.

• “The Lyceum Banner.” Present Age 2 (26 March 1870); p. 2.

• “The Lyceum Banner.” Banner of Light 27 (30 April 1870); p. 4.

• “The Lyceum Banner.” Standard-Phonographic Visitor 4 (23 May 1870); p. 555.

• notice. Providence Evening Press [Providence, Rhode Island] 25 Jan 1871; p. 1.

• “Spiritualistm in Chicago.” The Chicago Republican 20 Sept 1871; p. 4.

• “The Sufferers.” The Chicago Tribune [Chicago, Illinois] 13 Oct 1871; p. 2.

• “ ‘Lyceum Banner’ Supplement.” The American Spiritualist 4 (21 Oct 1871); p. 10.

• “The Lyceum Banner.” The American Spiritualist 4 (4 Nov 1871); p. 6.

• “The Lyceum Banner.” Banner of Light 30 (11 Nov 1871); p. 4.

• “Lyceum Banner Fund.” The American Spiritualist 4 (18 Nov 1871); p. 11.

• “The Lyceum Banner Alive Again.” Banner of Light 30 (16 Dec 1871); p. 4.

• “Lou. H. Kimball’s Lyceum Banner.” Banner of Light 30 (23 Dec 1871); p. 5.

Geo. P. Rowell & Co.’s American Newspaper Directory. New York: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1872; p. 31. [archive.org]

• “The Lyceum Banner.” Banner of Light 30 (20 Jan 1872); p. 4.

• “Temporary Suspension of the Lyceum Banner.” Banner of Light 31 (27 July 1872); p. 4.

• “What is to be Done for the Lyceum Banner?” Banner of Light 31 (7 Sept 1872); p. 4.

• “The Lyceum Banner.” Banner of Light 32 (28 Sept 1872); p. 5.

• “The Little Bouquet.” Banner of Light 32 (19 Oct 1872); p. 4.

• “The Little Bouquet.” Religio-Philosophical Journal 13 (9 Nov 1872); p. 6.

• W. F. Jamieson. The Clergy a Source of Danger to the American Republic, 2nd ed. Chicago, Illinois: W. F. Jamieson, 1873; p. 319.

• “The Little Bouquet.” Banner of Light 32 (4 Jan 1873); p. 4.

• “The Little Bouquet.” Banner of Light 32 (3 May 1873); p. 4.

• “The Little Bouquet.” Religio-Philosophical Journal 14 (3 May 1873); p. 4.

• “The Little Bouquet.” Banner of Light 33 (7 June 1873); p. 4.

• Betty Longenecker Lyon. “A History of Children’s Secular Magazines Published in the United States from 1789-1899.” PhD diss. Johns Hopkins, 1942; p. 245.

Kind Words for the Sunday School ChildrenKind Words, the Child’s Delight ; Jan 1866-29 Sept 1929

edited by: 1868, T. B. Kingsbury • 1869, Sally Rochester Ford • 1870, T. C. Teasdale; Samuel Boykin • 1871-1899, Samuel Boykin

published: Greenville, South Carolina: Home Mission Board of the Southern Baptist Convention, 1866-1868. Printed in New York [Joseph Walker]

• Memphis, Tennessee: Home Mission Board of the Southern Baptist Convention, 1868-1873; publisher at 40 Madison St., 1868; publisher at 37 South Court St., 1869

• Marion, Alabama: Home Mission Board of the Southern Baptist Convention, 1874-Nov 1875.

• Macon, Georgia: Home Mission Board of the Southern Baptist Convention, Dec 1875-June 1886.

• Atlanta, Georgia: Home Mission Board of the Southern Baptist Convention, 1886-

frequency: only monthly, Jan 1866-June 1869

• semimonthly added, July 1869. The semimonthly publication was added once circulation reached 30,000. [The Baptist 20 Feb 1869]

• weekly added, 1871

description: 1866: prices: 1 copy, 10¢/ year; 10 copies, $10/ year; “no subscription received for less than Ten Copies, nor for less time than One Year.” [Newberry Weekly Herald 26 Sept 1866]

• 1868: “increased size”; price, 1 copy, 50¢/ year

• Perhaps no issue for July 1868. [Tennessee Baptist 25 July 1868]

• 1870: price: 1 copy, semimonthly, 50¢/ year; monthly, 25¢/ year

• 1871: prices: 1 copy, weekly, $1/ year; semimonthly, 50¢/ year; monthly, 25¢/ year

• Circulation: early 1867, 25,000. 1867-1868, 370,000 copies issued (abt 31,583 per month); “on which there is a deficit of $208.08.” [“Southern Baptist Convention.” Richmond Dispatch 9 May 1868]

• 1869: early 1869, 25,000-30,000; July 1869, 18,000

• Religious focus: Southern Baptist

relevant information:

• In 1866, G. G. Wells was the mailing agent in Greenville, South Carolina.

• W. F. Broadus wrote for the paper as “Cousin Will.”

• April 1868-1869: amount received for subscriptions to Kind Words: $1,867.36; amount paid for paper and to print Kind Words: $1,488.20; amount paid to Ford for editing: $100 [The Baptist 29 May 1869]

• The paper often felt in competition with other Baptist papers for children: Child’s Delight (which it eventually absorbed) and The Young Reaper • Young Reaper (see S. Boykin. “ ‘Kind Words’ vs. ‘Young Reaper’ ”; The Biblical Recorder 4 May 1870)

relevant quotes:

• The Intelligencer got poetic about the title: “Who has not felt the influence of words kindly spoken? In the sunny days of childhood, their utterance creates a memory which clings through all the vicissitudes of life.” [1 Feb 1866]

• The Biblical Recorder [Raleigh, North Carolina] was … not impressed, calling the paper “ugly” in an article currently unavailable; the paper was taken to task by a correspondent for being jealous: “You are pretty severe, bro. Editor, in your issue of Feb. 15, about the unattractive appearance of the little Sunday School paper, ‘Kind Words,’ published by the Board at Greenville, S. C. I am half inclined to charge you, in a good natured and friendly way, with wanting to take a little revenge on the Greenville printer, who beat the Raleigh printers so badly during the war, but who at present is under the weather from broken railroad connections and consequent lack of material. Hit him while you can, bro. H., for the chance won’t last long; before many months it is quite possible he may beat you again. The fact is that the Board knew they could not now bring out a paper in handsome style, but it seemed so very desirable to begin at once, that they determined to do their best and take the consequences. the dingy paper, bad ink, and lack of pictures, must last for several numbers, but we hope, as you intimate will be the case, to make it much more good looking after a while, so that it may compare as favorably in appearance with ‘papers of a similar character published elsewhere,’ as the Recorder does with the N. Y. Examiner. And you did’nt [sic] say a word about the contents, which some of us thought were really interesting for children, and calculated to do them good. Ah! Mr. Editor, if folks go to judging you and me by outward appearance only, I am afraid we shall come off badly; while if estimated according to inward worth, we think it would be far otherwise. … I think the little folks will like to have it at once, and before the year is out I hope it will be as good looking as the Recorder, and much better looking than the editor.” [J. A. Broadus] Broadus, president of the Sabbath School Board of the Southern Baptist Convention, defended the paper again at the 1866 meeting of the Baptist General Association of Virginia. [11 June 1866]

• At the Southern Baptist Convention, the report “in relation to the little paper called Kind Words, published at Greenville, South Carolina, at ten cents per annum, elicited a warm discussion in favor of Sabbath Schools.” [Telegraph]

• The Baton Rouge Tri-Weekly Gazette went for some regional pride: “As a Southern enterprise it addresses itself with peculiar claims for support and encouragement to parents and guardians as well as to the children themselves, of the South.” [2 Oct 1866]

• In 1868, the paper was unprofitable, but the publication board literally doubled it: “It has been hitherto published at a heavy loss to the [Sunday School Board of the Southern Baptist Convention], and has involved it in debt. It has been resolved by the new Board to increase the size, and by smaller type, double the amount of reading matter, and make it not only a useful and interesting, but a beautiful paper.” [Tennessee Baptist 4 July 1868]

• The Aug 1868 issue impressed the Tennessee Baptist: “Have you seen the August number of our Southern Baptist Convention Sunday-school paper? It is not often that, so elegant a wood cut is found adorning the pages of a paper for the young folks. The editor says that it cost fifteen times as much as the ordinary cuts cost. Such liberality on the part of those engaged in getting it up ought to be appreciated. The reading matter is also good. This number of our paperKind Words—contains about fifty per cent. more of reading matter than former numbers.” [“Special Notices”]

• Critics were everywhere, with S. J. Wheeler excited by the idea of a Sunday School paper being published in North Carolina and backhanding Kind Words: “We are delighted to hear of the possibility of having a Sunday School paper in North Carolina …. If however the illustrations are no better than those in Child’s Delight and Kind Words it had better never be commenced, for our children who have taken, or read the Young Reaper will not touch either the Georgia or Memphis paper. It is worse than useless to force them on the little fellows. … It may be said that the Board at Memphis cannot raise funds efficient [sic] to employ good engravers and buy good paper. Men of sense in secular affairs do not argue thus, they borrow funds, initiate an instrumentality that commands, never begs patronage.” [S. J. Wheeler] The Sunday School Teacher, to be edited by T. M. Hughes, appears not to have been published.

• E. Dodson put the prices of the Baptist papers in perspective: “Now it is the time to take the [Biblical] Recorder. It will cost as much as one medical bill. Some say butter is 40 cents in Richmond. Any old woman with 7½ lbs. of butter might get the Recorder a year. Any child with 3 dozen eggs can get the ‘Home and Fore[i]gn Journal,’ for 50 cents; Kind Words or Child’s Delight for the same money.”

• The organization had a low bar for success: “The receipts for subscriptions for the past four months being equal to the cost of publishing, it, therefore, may be considered a success.” [S. C. Rogers]

• There may have been plans to publish another periodical for children before Kind Words absorbed the Child’s Delight: in Jan 1869 one wouldbe subscriber sent money for a “Child’s Magazine” which had not yet been published. the editor of the Tennessee Baptist replied: “We send you the Kind Words, but the ‘Child’s Magazine’ is not yet published, and will not be before next fall or January, ’70. What shall we do with your dollar?” [“Letterbox.” 16 Jan 1869] Merging with Kind Words at the end of 1869, Child’s Delight may have taken the place of the unnamed magazine.

• Publishers felt that the paper was essential for spiritual growth: “Now, here is [a letter] not quite so kind. We would not give a baubee for a thousand such schools as as Bro. Hodges’ at Hartwell. There will be hundreds of Pedobaptists and Catholics manufactured through the influence of this school. [The letter:] Please discontinue our papers for the Sunday-school here. Our school being ‘Union,’ your paper does not suit. F. B. Hodges, Superintendent. Hartwell, Ga., Feb. 28, 1869.” [Tennessee Baptist 3 April 1869]

• The editor of the Tennessee Baptist became impatient about the comparative popularity of Child’s Delight: “Why is it that the Southern Baptist papers, that so warmly advocate the interests of the Southern Convention, give their entire editorial influence in favor of the Child’s Delight, a private paper, commending it to the patronage of every family and ever Baptist Sabbath-school, while they seldom mention the organ of one of the Boards of the Convention?” [16 Oct 1869]

• Which is why he may have experienced some schadenfreude when the demise of the Delight was announced a few months later: “The S. S. Board at its last meeting purchased the subscription list of The Child’s Delight of Bro. Boykin, Georgia, and the two papers will be consolidated on the first day of January, 1870, and henceforth issued from this city, as ‘Kind Words, the Child’s Delight,” and Bro. Boykin will jointly edit it with Bro. Teasdale. The issue of the two will be nearly forty thousand.” [“An Important Movement”]

• The proposed new paper was thus described: “Beautiful in its external embellishments; sound in its theological tenets; free from objectionable sectionalism, and offensive epithets toward our wronged and suffering people; able and dignified in the character of its correspondence, it will be all that can be neede to amuse and instruct our Southern children.” [Thomas C. Teasdale. “Sunday-School Board”] It also would have a “new and elegant dress,” beginning with the May 1870 issue. [Thomas C. Teasdale. “Our Beautiful May Queen”]

absorbed: The Child’s Index; Child’s Delight (Sept 1862-1869)

source of information: OCLC; notices, etc., below

available: AASHistPer, series 5 (1876 only)

bibliography:

• A Sunday School Paper. The Newberry Weekly Herald [Newberry, South Carolina] 13 Dec 1865; p. 2.

• “Kind Words.” The Intelligencer [Anderson, South Carolina] 1 Feb 1866; p. 2.

• “Kind Words.” The Newberry Weekly Herald [Newberry, South Carolina] 7 Feb 1866; p. 2.

• Kind Words for the Sunday School Children. Keowee Courier [Pickens, South Caroline] 10 Feb 1866; p. 2.

• J. A. Broadus. “Kind Words.” The Biblical Recorder [Raleigh, North Carolina] 8 March 1866; p. 2.

• Southern Baptist Convention, report of third day. The Macon Daily Telegraph [Macon, Georgia] 2 June 1866; p. 1.

• “Baptist General Association of Virginia.” Richmond Dispatch [Richmond, Virginia] 11 June 1866; p. 2.

• “Kind Words.” The Newberry Weekly Herald [Newberry, South Carolina] 26 Sept 1866; p. 2.

• “Kind Words—For Little ones.—No. 10.” The Times-Picayune [New Orleans, Louisiana] 26 Sept 1866; p. 2.

• “Kind Words.” The Newberry Weekly Herald [Newberry, South Carolina] 26 Sept 1866; p. 3.

• “Kind Words.” Bacon Rouge Tri-Weekly Gazette and Comet [Baton Rouge, Louisiana] 2 Oct 1866; p. 2.

• Kind Words. Alexandria Gazette [Alexandria, Virginia] 11 Dec 1866; p. 2.

• advertisement. Tennessee Baptist [Memphis, Tennessee] 4 May 1867; p. 7.

• “Southern Baptist Convention.” The Louisville Daily Courier [Louisville, Kentucky] 11 May 1867; p. 4.

• “The Southern Baptist Convention.” Richmond Dispatch [Richmond, Virginia] 9 May 1868; p. 3.

• “Kind Words.” Tennessee Baptist [Memphis, Tennessee] 4 July 1868; p. 9.

• Dr. W. F. Broaddus. The Biblical Recorder [Raleigh, North Carolina] 8 July 1868; p. 2.

• “Kind Words.” Tennessee Baptist [Memphis, Tennessee] 18 July 1868; p. 5.

• “Distinguished Visitors.” The Athens Weekly Post [Athens, Alabama] 23 July 1868; p. 3.

• “Kind Words.” Tennessee Baptist [Memphis, Tennessee] 25 July 1868; p. 5.

• “Kind Words.” Tennessee Baptist [Memphis, Tennessee] 15 Aug 1868; p. 8.

• “Kind Words.” The Biblical Recorder [Raleigh, North Carolina] 26 Aug 1868; p. 3.

• “Special Notices: Our Paper.” Tennessee Baptist [Memphis, Tennessee] 29 Aug 1868; p. 5.

• advertisement. Tennessee Baptist [Memphis, Tennessee] 5 Sept 1868; p. 8. Also, 12 Dec 1868; p. 7.

• advertisement. The Biblical Recorder [Raleigh, North Carolina] 9 Sept 1868; p. 3.

• S. J. Wheeler. “My Pen Has Been Silent.” The Biblical Recorder [Raleigh, North Carolina] 9 Sept 1868; p. 2.

• “Kind Words.” The Biblical Recorder [Raleigh, North Carolina] 9 Sept 1868; p. 3. Also, 23 Sept 1868; p. 2. Also, 30 Sept 1868; p. 3.

• Joseph Walker. “We Might, Perhaps, By Doing Justly and Acting Wisely.” The Baptist [Memphis, Tennessee] 7 Nov 1868; p. 3.

• E. Dodson. “Papers.” The Biblical Recorder [Raleigh, North Carolina] 13 Jan 1869; p. 2.

• “Letterbox”: D. Dollar. Tennessee Baptist [Memphis, Tennessee] 16 Jan 1869; p. 5.

• S. C. Rogers. “Sunday-School Board S. B. C.” The Baptist [Memphis, Tennessee] 16 Jan 1869; p. 4.

• “Letterbox”: St. Clair Lawrence, Miss. Tennessee Baptist [Memphis, Tennessee] 23 Jan 1869; p. 5.

• M. T. Sumner. “The Sunday School Board and ‘Kind Words.’ ” Tennessee Baptist [Memphis, Tennessee] 13 Feb 1869; p. 5.

• “The Sabbath-School Convention.” The Baptist [Memphis, Tennessee] 20 Feb 1869; p. 5.

• “Kind Words.” Tennessee Baptist [Memphis, Tennessee] 3 April 1869; p. 4.

• “Kind Words.” The Biblical Recorder [Raleigh, North Carolina] 14 April 1869; p. 3.

• “Annual Session of the Southern Baptist Convention.” The Baptist [Memphis, Tennessee] 29 May 1869; p. 3.

• “10,000 Additional Subscribers.” Tennessee Baptist [Memphis, Tennessee] 19 June 1869; p. 5.

• Kind Words. Tennesssee Baptist [Memphis, Tennessee] 10 July 1869; p. 5.

• advertisement. Tennessee Baptist [Memphis, Tennessee] 10 July 1869; p. 8.

• “Kind Words.” Tennessee Baptist [Memphis, Tennessee] 17 July 1869; p. 4.

• “Kind Words.” Tennessee Baptist [Memphis, Tennessee] 25 Sept 1869; p. 5.

• “From the West.” Tennessee Baptist [Memphis, Tennessee] 2 Oct 1869; p. 4.

• “Kind Words.” Tennessee Baptist [Memphis, Tennessee] 9 Oct 1869; p. 7.

• “Kind Words.” Tennessee Baptist [Memphis, Tennessee] 16 Oct 1869; p. 4.

• Thomas C. Teasdale. “An Appeal.” Tennessee Baptist [Memphis, Tennessee] 30 Oct 1869; p. 2.

• “An Important Movement.” Tennessee Baptist [Memphis, Tennessee] 18 Dec 1869; p. 4.

• “Kind Words, the Child’s Delight.” Tennessee Baptist [Memphis, Tennessee] 25 Dec 1869; p. 8.

• Thomas C. Teasdale. “Our Beautiful May Queen.” Tennessee Baptist [Memphis, Tennessee] 26 March 1870; p. 5.

• Thomas C. Teasdale. “Sunday-School Board.” Tennessee Baptist [Memphis, Tennessee] 26 March 1870; p. 6.

• S. Boykin. “ ‘Kind Words’ vs. ‘Young Reaper.’ ” Biblical Recorder [Raleigh, North Carolina] 27 April 1870; p. 4.

• “The Board at Memphis.” The Biblical Recorder [Raleigh, North Carolina] 4 May 1870; p. 2.

• “Kind Words.” Tennessee Baptist [Memphis, Tennessee] 12 Aug 1871; p. 8.

• Kind Words. The Biblical Recorder [Raleigh, North Carolina] 23 Aug 1871; p. 3.

• advertisement. The Biblical Recorder [Raleigh, North Carolina] 30 Aug 1871; p. 4.

• “Kind Words!” The Biblical Recorder [Raleigh, North Carolina] 4 Oct 1871; p. 3.

• advertisement. Tennessee Baptist [Memphis, Tennessee] 6 Jan 1872; p. 7.

• “Kind Words.” Tennessee Baptist 13 Jan 1872; p. 5.

• “The Debt of the Sunday-School Board.” Tennessee Baptist [Memphis, Tennessee] 24 Feb 1872; p. 2.

• advertisement. Tennessee Baptist [Memphis, Tennessee] 2 March 1872; p. 6.

• “To Southern Baptist Sunday-School Workers.” The Biblical Recorder [Raleigh, North Carolina] 20 March 1872; p. 4.

• advertisement. The Biblical Recorder [Raleigh, North Carolina] 28 Aug 1872; p. 4.

• Z. T. Leavell and T. J. Bailey. A Complete History of Mississippi Baptists, From the Earliest Times. Jackson, Mississippi: Mississippi Baptist Publishing Co., 1904; vol 1: pp. 210, 233-236, 275, 440, 456, 459, 464, 491, 596-597, 625, 632, 661

• Daniel W. Stowell. Rebuilding Zion: The Religious Reconstruction of the South, 1863-1877. New York: Oxford University Press, 1998; p. 120, 121.

Spare Hours ; Jan-Dec 1866

edited by: “Grandpa Prattle”

published: Boston, Massachusetts: Patrick Donahoe, Jan-Dec 1866.

frequency: monthly; 1 vol/ year

description: 64 pp.; page size, 8.5″ h x 5.5″ w; price, $2/ year • Religious focus: Catholic

relevant quotes:

• Beginning: “P. Donahoe, Boston, announces the publication of a new illustrated magazine for the young folk. It is to be called ‘Spare Hours,’ and is to appear early in December. there is room for such a publication, and we hope it will prove a success, and that Mr. Donahoe will make it equal to anything of the kind published in this country. A good magazine for the young has been a want long felt. The subscription price is two dollars a year.” [notice. The Catholic World]

• Some advertisements were specific about its intended audience: “This is a new and handsomely published magazine, from the well-known Catholic bookseller and publisher, P. Donahoe, of Boston, and is designed more especially for our Irish-American Catholic citizens and their families. It should have an extensive circulation among them, and receive a liberal support.” [advertisement. Burlington Weekly Sentinel] “We cannot too warmly recommend it to our Irish Catholic readers, as furnishing excellent reading for their children,” the Burlington Weekly Sentinel wrote. [27 April 1866]

• Other editors were hopeful: “SPARE HOURS: A Monthly Miscellany for the Young. Boston, Massachusetts: P. Donahoe. January, 1866. We have received the first number of a new magazine with the above title. It is published by Mr. Donahoe, Boston, is well printed on fine paper, and illustrated with much taste. The matter, of which there are 64 pages, is both original and selected, and displays discrimination and tact on the part of the editor. It would be well to give credit to the source from which the selected matter is taken. This magazine fills a want long felt by the Catholic community in this country. Since the discontinuance of the ‘Youth’s Catholic Magazine’ we have had no periodical that gave us any reading for our children. We cordially welcome the advent of ‘Spare Hours’ amongst us, and trust its subscription list may show that Catholics do appreciate good reading.” [review. The Catholic World]

• Paying for subscriptions could be complicated: “In remitting, preference should be given to post office money orders. If these cannot be obtained, drafts upon New York or Boston, payable to the order of Patrick Donahoe, should be sent, rather than bank notes.” [advertisement. Burlington Weekly Sentinel]

• The magazine kept its readers up-to-date with cultural innovations: “Among the good things in the June number of this growing popular Catholic Monthly, we note an excellent and instructive article on the new and fashionable game of ‘Croquet,’ with instructions for playing it &c. The next number of ‘Spare Hours’ promises to contain an original story, by John Savage, Esq., complete in one number, entitled ‘Eva, a Goblin Romance,’ prepared expressly for this publication. Mr. Donahoe spares no pains to make his Monthly a first class one, and his success thus far has been all that one could desire.” [“Spare Hours, June 1866”]

• Concluding: “The Spare Hours magazine, which it has been my pleasure to edit during the past year, opened with what appeared to every one supposed to possess a knowledge of such things, under the best possible auspices. Other publishers were satisfying the Protestant community by offering them choice general reading; and we, to satisfy an equal demand, issued the Spare Hours to our own. Faithful, alas, to the precedents of Catholic literature in this country, five millions of Catholics have proved themselves unwilling to support a magazine filled with wholesome reading, combining interesting fact and fancy with the moral teachings of religion. Perhaps our fault has been that our issues have not been crowded with ‘blood and thunder,’—that we have not secured some of the many Dime-Novel writers; but if it has been we feel somewhat consoled in our labors, that our magazine has not been stained by any such compositions. Much as we regret to make the statement, it is nevertheless urgent upon us to say that the Spare Hours will be discontinued after the present number.” [1 (Dec 1866); p. 761]

source of information: 1866 bound volume; Lyon

bibliography:

• advertisement. The Burlington Weekly Sentinel [Burlington, Vermont] 22 Dec 1865; p. 3.

• notice. The Catholic World 2 (Jan 1866); p. 576.

• “Spare Hours, for February, No. 2.” The Burlington Weekly Sentinel [Burlington, Vermont] 26 Jan 1866; p. 3.

• review. The Catholic World 2 (Feb 1866); p. 718.

• “Spare Hours.” Detroit Free Press [Detroit, Michigan] 26 Feb 1866; p. 1.

• “Spare Hours.” The Burlington Weekly Sentinel [Burlington, Vermont] 27 april 1866; p. 3.

• “Spare Hours, June 1866.” The Burlington Weekly Sentinel [Burlington, Vermont] 1 June 1866; p. 3.

• Betty Longenecker Lyon. “A History of Children’s Secular Magazines Published in the United States from 1789-1899.” PhD diss. Johns Hopkins, 1942; p. 243.

The Youth’s Temperance Banner ; Jan 1866-1917

cover/masthead: 1866-1868 | 1869-1871, 1873

published: New York, New York: National Temperance Society, Jan 1866-. 1866, publisher at 111 Fulton St.; 1867-1870, publisher at 172 William St.

frequency: monthly; 1 vol/ year

description: 4 pp.; folio • 1867, 1870-1871, 1873: page size, 13.25″ h x 10″ w

• Price: Prices: 1866-1867: 1 copy, 30¢/ year; 10 copies, $2/ year; 50 copies, $8/ year; 100 copies, $15/ year. • 1870-1871: 1 copy, 25¢/ year; 8 copies, $1/ year; 10 copies, $1.25/ year; 15 copies, $1.88/ year; 20 copies, $2.50/ year; 30 copies, $3.75/ year; 40 copies, $5/ year; 50 copies, $6.25/ year; 100 copies, $12/ year. • 1800s-1900s, 40¢/ year; after 1907, 25¢/ year

• Circulation: April 1868-April 1869, 1,294,700 individual papers (about 107,891 subscribers). May 1870-May 1871, 1,469,800 individual papers (about 122,483 subscribers). 1872, 120,000 subscribers

relevant information:

• The Banner was proposed when the National Temperance and Publication Society was founded in 1865, in order to promote interest in temperance.

• 1866-1871, 1873: Under the direction of John N. Stearns, from 1855 through 1866 editor of Robert Merry’s Museum (Feb 1841-Nov 1872). In 1866, subscribers to the Museum who sent in the names of new subscribers could receive a free copy of the Banner with their copy of the Museum.

source of information: 1866-1871, 1873 scattered issues; Robert Merry’s Museum ; Zion’s Herald ; Christian Advocate ; Christian Union notices, etc., below; OCLC; Lyon

available: AASHistPer, series 5

bibliography:

• “The Temperance Movement.” Rutland Weekly Herald [Rutland, Vermont] 14 Dec 1865; p. 4.

• “Temperance Movement.” Fall River Daily Evening News [Fall River, Massachusetts] 26 Dec 1865; p. 2.

• J. N. Stearns. “A Word with My Patrons.” Robert Merry’s Museum 21 (Jan 1866); p. 125.

• notice. The Farmers’ Cabinet [Amherst, New Hampshire] 4 Jan 1866; p. 2.

• “Two New Temperance Periodicals.” Zion’s Herald and Wesleyan Journal 37 (17 Jan 1866); p. 10.

• We have received the first number. Fall River Daily Evening News [Fall River, Massachusetts] 19 Jan 1866; p. 2.

• “Merry’s Monthly Chat with his Friends.” Robert Merry’s Museum 22 (July 1866); p. 186.

• advertisement. The Sun [New York, New York] 13 oct 1866; p. 1.

• advertisement. Christian Advocate 42 (17 Jan 1867); p. 24.

• “Editor’s Table: The Red Bridge.” The Indicator [Warrenton, North Carolina 17 April 1867; p. 2.

• “Temperance Papers.” The Wilmington Post [Wilmington, North Carolina] 27 Nov 1867; p. 3.

• “Good Papers.” Wyandotte Commercial Gazette [Kansas City, Kansas] 7 March 1868; p. 2.

Geo. P. Rowell & Co’s American Newspaper Directory. New York: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1869; p. 78. [archive.org]

• “Temperance.” The Lawrence Tribune [Lawrence, Kansas] 19 May 1869; p. 2.

• “Favors.” The Enterprise and Vermonter [Vergennes, Vermont] 17 Dec 1869; p. 2.

The Men Who Advertise. New York: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1870; p. 708. [google books]

• advertisement. Christian Union 2 (26 Nov 1870); p. 336.

• The May Anniversaries at New York. Vermont Christian Messenger [Montpelier, Vermont] 1 June 1871; p. 2.

Geo. P. Rowell & Co.’s American Newspaper Directory. New York: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1872; p. 129. [archive.org]

• “The National Temperance Society and Publication House.” Vermont Phoenix [Brattleboro, Vermont] 5 Jan 1872; p. 4.

• Betty Longenecker Lyon. “A History of Children’s Secular Magazines Published in the United States from 1789-1899.” PhD diss. Johns Hopkins, 1942; pp. 252, 283-285.

Frank Leslie’s Children’s Friend ; April-Sept 1866 • Frank Leslie’s Boys’ and Girls’ Illustrated WeeklyFrank Leslie’s Boys’ and Girls’ Weekly ; 6 Oct 1866-9 Feb 1884

cover/masthead: 1870, 1872

edited by: Frank Leslie

published: New York, New York: Frank Leslie, April 1866-9 Feb 1884; publisher at 537 Pearl St., 1867-1868, 1870.

frequency: April-Sept 1866: monthly. 6 Oct 1866-1884: weekly: Wednesday

description:

• As the Children’s Friend: 32 pp.; prices: 10¢/ issue; $1/ year

• As the Weekly: Oct 1866: 8 pp.; prices: 3¢/ issue; 15¢/ month; $1.50/ year. Dec 1866: 16 pp. Prices: 5¢/ copy; 1 copy, $1.25/ 6 months, $2.50/ year; 3 copies, $6.50; 5 copies, $10; $2 for every additional subscription. Monthly parts, 20¢

• 1868: prices, 10¢/ copy; $2.50/ year

• 1870: 16 pp.; page size, 13.25″ h x 9″ w. Prices: 5¢/ copy; $2.50/ year

• 1872: 16 pp. Prices: 5¢/ copy; 1 copy, $1.25/ 6 months, $2.50/ year; 3 copies, $6.50; 5 copies, $10; $2 for each additional subscription

• The first issue of the Weekly is vol 1 #1

• Circulation: 1870, 27,000. 1872, 32,000

• 1877, with an 8-page supplement containing an extra story

relevant information: Leslie’s Illustrated Newspaper described some of the contents for May 1866. [28 April 1866]

relevant quotes:

• The Friend was announced in Feb: “On the 1st of March will be issued the first number of an Illustrated Monthly Periodical, for the Young, entitled, Frank Leslie’s Children’s Friend. This will be the cheapest, most instructive and amusing Magazine ever published for young folks; full of interesting matter, with numerous illustrations. Although the object of the publisher is to please children exclusively, yet the publication will have sufficient general interest to amuse grown-up people. The instruction, as well as the recreation of children, will be combined in Frank Leslie’s Children’s Friend. There are several admirable periodicals for youth of advanced years, but there is a real want existing: of something within the reach and capacity of younger children, which they can read and appreciate, and which shall be sufficiently cheap to be within the reach of the poorest families. … It will contain 32 pages, small quarto, price ten cents. Yearly subscription, one dollar.” [Frank Leslie’s Illustrated Newspaper 25 Feb 1866]

• A later description pretended to be an effusive essay by an impartial reviewer: “A magazine for children, not too wise, not too instructive, and not too pious, has long been a desideratum in this country. Children, as a general rule, get quite enough cramming in the way of lolly-pop science; and an occasional story that does not wind up with a text or a sermon, is a thing which big as well as little children delight in. Healthfulness of tone and sound morality are far removed from cant, and preaching is an excellent thing in its place. Adam Clarke, the great commentator and Oriental scholar, affirmed that his tastes were first directed to Eastern studies through a desire to read the Arabian Nights and its kindred stories in the original. There can be no doubt that the publication of Robinson Crusoe did more to stimulate English maritime adventure and enterprise than all the legislation of the British empire. Ergo; pleasant stories without a strained moral, in which illustrations of customs and scenery, and geography, and for that matter, of natural history, are interwoven, may be most useful things for children, without necessarily winding up with a long paragraph, often dragged in forcibly, about the impropriety of playing marbles on Sunday—which paragraph youthful intelligence will certainly omit. We have been led into those remarks apropos of a new and brilliantly illustrated monthly, entitled: ‘Frank Leslie’s Children’s Friend,’ just issued from this office. It is a handsome small quarto of 32 pages, with a score or more of engravings, covering a variety of subjects—stories, fairy tales, scenery, adventures, natural history, simple games, etc., etc.—in fine, whatever may interest the little group which makes the family cheerful and sustains the parent through household trials. xsFrom grave to gay, from lively to severe,’ seems to be the motto of the editors, and we will venture to say, that no publication for the young, in this country, or any other, has ever so completely realized the wants of youth of both sexes, between the ages of 6 and 16, as the charming little magazine before us. No parent can neglect to let this 10 cents’ worth of sunshine into his household. One glance at the happy faces of his children will more than repay him for a year’s subscription.” [Leslie’s Illustrated Newspaper 10 March 1866]

Flake’s Bulletin had difficulty with the title: “We thank Mason for the Child’s Magazine, a new and pleasing venture of Frank Leslie’s; also for the Lady’s Book for April.” [notice. Flake’s Bulletin] While “Mason” probably was a periodicals agent for Galveston, Texas, coincidentally, T. Mason published The Child’s Magazine; the periodical ended in 1844.

• Some newspapers focused more on Leslie than the Friend. The Leavenworth Times focused on fecundity: “Frank Leslie is as prolific in publications as Dumas in novels. His latest is the ‘Children’s Friend,’ an admirable work for the little folks.” [27 April 1866] The Richmond Dispatch seemed … obscure: “We have received a copy of this monthly—a good one for children, but published by a sorry fellow.” [28 May 1866]

• While insisting that the Friend was greatly successful, a change in the magazine was announced in Sept 1866: “Hereafter the Children’s Friend will appear weekly, instead of monthly, under the title of the Boy’s and Girls’ Illustrated Weekly, with some new features, so that, while retaining the general tone and character of the present form, it will be rendered additionally attractive and valuable. The signal popularity of the Children’s Friend is the best evidence of the need of such a periodical, and we congratulate its patrons on the treat they will enjoy when it comes to them in its new form, and with its weekly installment of good things.” [“Frank Leslie’s Children’s Friend.” Leslie’s Illustrated Newspaper] The new version was advertised in the next column of the Newspaper: “On and after October 6th Frank Leslie’s Children’s Friend will be published weekly, in the form of a handsome paper of eight pages, of three columns each, under the title of Boys’ and Girls’ illustrated Weekly. The Illustrated Weekly will take a wider range than The Children’s Friend, and will be more adapted to the tastes and capacities of boys and girls than that publication; but it will nevertheless retain, as an important feature, a page for children of tender years, so that it will be a welcome visitor in every family, having something of interest for all its members. It will preserve the same pure and healthful tone that has characterized The Children’s Friend, and given it signal popularity. It will contain stories, travels, adventures, sketches of natural history and scenery, illustrations of manners and customs of all nations, biography, anecdotes, sports for the parlor and the field, arithmetical and geographical exercises, poetry, and whatever else may serve to instruct and entertain the young. Every number will have five or more fine illustrations, besides comic and minor engravings.” [“Frank Leslie’s Boys’ & Girls’ Illustrated Weekly, and Children’s Friend”]

• At the end of 1866, the popularity of the Friend forced another change: “The great success of Frank Leslie’s Children’s Friend, which was only intended for children of tender years, has determined the publisher to enlarge his original design, and produce a paper which takes the entire range of our youthful classes. To carry out this design, the publisher has ENLARGED FRANK LESLIE’S BOYS’ AND GIRLS’ WEEKLY to SIXTEEN PAGES, of three columns each, making forty-eight columns of the most varied reading ever issued.” [Leslie’s Illustrated Newspaper 15 Dec 1868]

• By 1868, the number of illustrations had quadrupled: “One of the cheapest pictorial papers ever published. Intended for the amusement of youth of both sexes. … It contains, besides a continued story and well-written tales, accounts of wonderful adventure, descriptions and illustrations of foreign manners and customs, anecdotes and pictures of animals, familiar and funny fables, parlor magic, etc. From twenty to twenty-five engravings appear in each weekly issue.” [advertisement. The Independent]

• The Lancaster Intelligencer Journal was pleased to find itself the answer to an enigma in one issue: “Master Charles Sprenger, son of J. J. Sprenger, esq., of this city, we are informed, is the lad who composed the enigma in regard to the Lancaster Intelligencer …. Charlie is also the author of several others in that paper, and is a smart, little boy and thus improves his leisure time very properly.” [13 June 1868]

• In 1869-1872, like Our Young Folks’ Illustrated Paper, Leslie’s featured “Distinguished Scholars of our Schools”: an engraved portrait of a high school student with a biography. Thus, Leslie’s boasted, it was “the only [paper] that shows any active interest in what our young folk are doing.” [8 (10 Sept 1870); p. 335] More than one local newspaper printed a proud notice when the featured student had a connection with the town in which the newspaper was published.

• On the end of the magazine: “Mrs. Frank Leslie announces that, owing to the constant growth of her principal weekly and monthly publications, and the demands they make upon the resources of her establishment, she has disposed of the Boys’ and Girls’ Weekly to the Franklin Company of New York, under whose management the next issue will appear.” [36 (9 Feb 1884); p. 46; in Lyon; p. 306] However, the Franklin Company didn’t carry on the magazine.

source of information: advertisement. Frank Leslie’s Pleasant Hours. 2 (May 1867): back cover (cover page 4); 1868-1870, 1872, scattered issues; Lyon; Maxwell; Kelly; Rowell

available: AASHistPer, series 5

bibliography:

• “Notice to the Trade.” Frank Leslie’s Illustrated Newspaper 21 (25 Feb 1866); p. 368. Also, 21 (3 March 1866); p. 382.

• “The Children’s Friend.” Frank Leslie’s Illustrated Newspaper 21 (10 March 1866); p. 387.

• “Sundry Matters.” Hartford Courant [Hartford, Connecticut] 12 March 1866; p. 2.

• “Frank Leslie’s Children’s Friend.” Centralia Sentinel [Centralia, Illinois] 15 March 1866; p. 3.

• notice. Flake’s Bulletin [Galveston, Texas] 1 (22 March 1866); p. 4.

• “The Children’s Friend.” Frank Leslie’s Illustrated Newspaper 22 (31 March 1866); p. 19.

• “For Children.” Buffalo Courier [Buffalo, New York] 21 April 1866; p. 8.

• Frank Leslie is as prolific. The Leavenworth Times [Leavenworth, Kansas] 27 April 1866; p. 4.

• “For Children.” Frank Leslie’s Illustrated Newspaper 22 (28 April 1866); p. 83.

• “Frank Leslie’s Children’s Friend.” Frank Leslie’s Illustrated Newspaper 22 (19 May 1866); p. 142.

• “Frank Leslie’s Children’s Friend.” Richmond Dispatch [Richmond, Virginia] 28 May 1866; p. 1.

• Messrs. Quinn Brothers. The Charleston Daily News [Charleston, South Carolina] 31 May 1866; p. 5.

• “The Children’s Friend.” The Buffalo Commercial [Buffalo, New York] 29 June 1866; p. 3.

• “Frank Leslie’s Children’s Friend.” Frank Leslie’s Illustrated Newspaper 22 (1 Sept 1866); p. 367.

• “Frank Leslie’s Children’s Friend.” Frank Leslie’s Illustrated Newspaper 22 (15 Sept 1866); p. 414.

• “Frank Leslie’s Boys’ and Girls’ Weekly and Children’s Friend.” Frank Leslie’s Illustrated Newspaper 22 (15 Sept 1866); p. 414.

• “Frank Leslie’s Boys’ and Girl’s Weekly.” Times Union [Brooklyn, New York] 8 Nov 1866; p. 2.

• “Child’s Paper.” The Star and Enterprise [Newville, Pennsylvania] 24 Nov 1866; p. 2.

• “Now is the Time to Subscribe for Frank Leslie’s Boys’ and Girls’ Weekly.” Frank Leslie’s Illustrated Newspaper 22 (15 Dec 1866); p. 206.

• Frank Leslie has sent us a number or two. Columbia Democrat and Star of the North [Bloomsburg, Pennsylvania] 19 Dec 1866; p. 2.

• Frank Leslie’s Boys and Girls Weekly. The Enterprise and Vermonter [Vergennes, Vermont] 25 Jan 1867; p. 2.

• Frank Leslie’s Boys & Girls Weekly, Feb. 16. The Enteprise and Vermonter [Vergennes, Vermont] 15 Feb 1867; p. 2.

• “New Publications.” The Enterprise and Vermonter [Vergennes, Vermont] 23 Aug 1867; p. 2.

• “Frank Leslie’s Boys and Girls’ Weekly.” Bloomsburg Democrat [Bloomsburg, Pennsylvania] 20 May 1868; p. 2.

• “Local Summary”: Master Charles Sprenger. Intelligencer Journal [Lancaster, Pennsylvania] 13 Jan 1868; p. 2.

• Frank Leslie’s Boys and Girls Weekly. The Enterprise and Vermonter [Vergennes, Vermont] 14 Aug 1868; p. 2.

• “Children’s Magazines.” The St. Johnsbury Caledonian [St. Johnsbury, Vermont] 13 Nov 1868; p. 2.

• advertisement. The Independent 20 (24 Dec 1868); p. 8.

• “High Honor.” Richmond Dispatch [Richmond, Virginia] 16 Jan 1869; p. 1.

• “Frank Leslie’s Boys’ and Girls’ Weekly.” Springville Journal [Springville, New York] 16 Jan 1869; p. 2.

The Men Who Advertise. New York: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1870; p. 701. [google books]

• The last number of Frank Leslie’s Boys and Girl’s Weekly. Alexandria Gazette [Alexandria, Virginia] 3 Aug 1870; p. 2.

• “Books: Boys’ and Girls’ Weekly.” Sunday-School Times 12 (27 Aug 1870; p. 557.

Geo. P. Rowell & Co.’s American Newspaper Directory. New York: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1872; p. 120. [archive.org]

• Betty Longenecker Lyon. “A History of Children’s Secular Magazines Published in the United States from 1789-1899.” PhD diss. Johns Hopkins, 1942; pp. 242-243, 260, 302-307.

• J. P. Guinon and Ralph Adimari. Bibliographic Listing of Frank Leslie’s Boys’ and Girls’ Weekly. Fall River, Massachusetts: Edward T. LeBlanc, 1962.

Checklist of Children’s Books, 1837-1876, comp. Barbara Maxwell. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania: Special Collections, Central Children’s Department, Free Library of Philadelphia, 1975.

Children’s Periodicals of the United States, ed. R. Gordon Kelly. Westport, Connecticut & London, England: Greenwood Press, 1984.

• Gillian Avery. Behold the Child: American Children and Their Books, 1621-1922. Baltimore, Maryland: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1994; p. 147.

Ke Alaula (The path of light) ; Aperila (April) 1866-Malaki (March) 1873

cover/masthead: Aperila 1866-Malaki 1867 | Aperila 1867-1871

edited by: Orramel Hinckley Gulick (“O. H. Kulika”), 1866-April 1870

• Anderson Oliver Forbes (“A. O. Polepe”), May-July 1871

• Lorenzo Lyons (“L. Laiana”), Aug 1871-1873

published: Honolulu, Hawai‘i: N.p., for the Hawaiian Evangelical Association.

frequency: monthly; 1 vol/ year

description: 4 pp. • In Hawaiian

• Circulation: by Oct 1866, 4000 printed [“Meeting of the Evangelical Association”]. 1867, one of three Hawaiian-language papers with an aggregate circulation of 7800 [“Pen and Scissors”]. 1867, 4000 subscribers [“The Evangelical Association”; p. 92]

relevant quote:

• An announcement: “A new monthly paper is to be commenced in April, intended for the young, to correspond in size with the Child’s Paper printed by the American Tract Society. Such a publication has been much eneded, and will be welcomed in every part of the group. It is to be called “Ke Alaula,” the dawn or daybreak.” [notice]

relevant information: Gulick was the principal of the Waiulua Female Boarding School. [“Notes for the Quarter.”]

• The most recent issue was among publications sealed in the cornerstone of the government building dedicated 19 Feb 1872.

source of information: OCLC; AASHistPer; Maile Quarterly; Portland Transcript; Missionary Herald

available: AASHistPer, series 5

bibliography:

• notice. The Pacific Commercial Advertiser [Honolulu, Hawai‘i] 31 March 166; p. 2.

• “Notes for the Quarter.” The Maile Quarterly 1 (June 1866); p. 92.

• “Meeting of the Evangelical Association” The Missionary Herald 62 (Oct 1866); p. 296.

• “Pen and Scissors.” Portland Transcript [Portland, Maine] 31 (6 April 1867); p. 3.

• “The Evangelical Association.” The Maile Quarterly 2 (July 1867); pp. 91-92.

• “Laying the Corner-Stone of the New Government Building.” The Hawaiian Gazette [Honolulu, Hawai‘i] 21 Feb 1872; p. 2.

The Children’s Friend ; Fifth month (May) 1866-Twelfth month (Dec) 1887

cover/masthead: 1867 | 1868 | 1870-1876

edited by: Lydia H. Hall, 1866-1867

• Esther K. Smedley, 1866-1867, contributing editor; 1868-1872, editor; 1867, 1871, editor at 13 S. Church St., West Chester, Pennsylvania

• Anne Bradley, 1873-1874

• Mary Y. Hough, 1875-1887

published: West Chester, Pennsylvania: James P. Taylor, 1866.

• Philadelphia, Pennsylvania: James P. Taylor, 1867-.

• Philadelphia, Pennsylvania: Friends’ Book Association of Philadelphia, 1884; publisher at 1020 Arch St.

frequency: monthly; 1 vol/ year

description: 1866: 24 pp.; page size untrimmed, 8.75″ h x 6.5″ w; price, 15¢/ copy

• 1867-1875: 32 pp.; page size untrimmed, 8.75″ h x 6.5″ w; price, 15¢ or 25¢/ copy; $1.50/ year

• 1871, price, 15¢/ copy; $1.25/ year; $1.25/ 15 months

• Religious focus: Society of Friends (Quaker)

relevant information:

• There appear to be two different issues for Jan-April 1867: volume 1 began Fifth month 1866 and ran for 12 issues; volume 2 began First month 1867.

• The Friend was printed by James B. Rodgers, the Mercantile Printing Rooms, 6th St., Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Rodgers died in 1868; the death was announced in the 9th month issue. [“Our Letter Drawer.” 3 (Ninth month 1868); p. 292]

• Esther Smedley died 13 May 1873; the issue for Oct 1873 (vol 8 #10) featured an engraved portrait of her and a brief biography. Smedley was credited with founding the Friend.

relevant quotes:

• Introduction: “Dear Children: It is with words of cheer we greet you this beautiful Spring morning. We tap timidly at the door of your hearts, and await sweet words in token of your love. … It is not enough that your friends write and that you read, but that they write so that your comprehend; dropping here a seed and there a blossom, that you reading, shall glean of the good, giving warmth and beauty to the crown of life.” The periodical was meant to explore the tenets of the Society of Friends: “To impress upon the minds of the young these beautiful truths, emanating from the Divine mind, and inculcated by our early friends through bitter persecutions, long imprisonment, and even death; to blend with these the useful and attractive in nature, the lights and the shadows of life, is the happy mission of ‘The Children’s Friend.’ ” [Fifth month 1866, p. 1]

• Prospectus for 1869 volume: “It will be the object of the Editor, as heretofore, to prepare reading matter of a purely moral, interesting and instructive character, devoid of that glittering romance which pleases the mind, to the exclusion of more solid worth. Designed more particularly to supply a want long felt in the Society of Friends, it has also met the approval and appreciation of many of other denominations who now place it before their children.” [“Prospectus of The Children’s Friend.” 3 (Eleventh month 1868): inside front cover (cover page 2)]

absorbed by: Little Gem and Kindergarten ; Sept 1874?-after April 1879

source of information: 1866-1876, bound volumes & scattered issues; Lyon; Schaf; OCLC

available: AASHistPer, series 5

excerpts online

bibliography:

• J. Thomas Scharf and Thompson Westcott. History of Philadelphia, 1609-1884. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania: L. H. Everts & Co., 1884; vol 3, p. 2037. [google books]

• Betty Longenecker Lyon. “A History of Children’s Secular Magazines Published in the United States from 1789-1899.” PhD diss. Johns Hopkins, 1942; pp. 242, 281-282.

Demorest’s Young America ; Nov 1866-1875

cover/masthead: early 1867 | June 1867 | late 1867-1868 | 1869 | 1870 | 1871-1872

edited by: William J. Demorest, possibly assisted by Jennie Croly

published: New York, New York: W. Jennings Demorest, Nov 1866-1875; publisher at 473 Broadway, in 1867; publisher at 838 Broadway, in 1870-1872

frequency: monthly; 1 vol/ year

description: 1867: 32 pp.; duodecimo; page size untrimmed, 6″ h x 4 5/8″ w; prices: 15¢/ issue; 1 copy, $1.50/ year; 5 copies, $1/ year

• Nov 1868-Dec 1870: 40 pp; page size, 7.25″ h x 5.5″ w; price, $1.50/ year

• Jan 1871-1872: 32 pp.; page size, 8.5″ h x 5.5″ w. Prices: 10¢/ issue; $1/ year

• Circulation: 1869, 10,000; 1872, 15,000

• Nov 1866-Oct 1868 issues have no year on the covers, though all have a copyright date of 1866 on the inside front cover (cover page 2). Issues for vol 1 (Nov 1866-Oct 1867) tend to have only the relevant month on the front cover; issues for vol 2 (Nov 1867-Oct 1868) have volume and issue numbers on the front.

• Vol 1-3 (Nov 1866-Oct 1869); vol 4 (Nov 1869-Dec 1870); vol 5-9 (Jan 1871-Dec 1875)

• A small version was available as a premium: “A pet item was the Miniature Magazine, a tiny handful which sold for 5 cents and was a reproduction of the large one.” [Ross; p. 146]

• The Nov 1866 issue was available as a “school edition” which could be distributed by teachers to pupils as specimens. [Advertisement. American Educational Monthly Jan 1867]

relevant quotes:

• The magazine promised something for everyone: “Young America has really found a representative in this brilliant little periodical, which is as full of stories, pictures, puzzles, boys and fun, as any little boy or girl could desire. It is, moreover, not only entertaining, but instructive: containing hints and information on all sorts of subjects, and capital suggestions, introduced in a way to interest children, and make them follow up the subject for themselves. Parents will find it a valuable auxiliary to their efforts for home amusements and education.” [“Literary Notices.”]

• The Highland Weekly News felt that the magazine “looks more like a children’s magazine than the larger, ‘grown up’ monthlies. The pictures are very pretty, and the reading matter is evidently prepared by some one who knows what children like, and can understand.” [29 Nov 1866]

• Enlarging the magazine in Nov 1868 began in July: “A Great Secret!—If our Young Americans will come up close, so no others can hear, we will tell them a great secret, and one they will be very much pleased to know. It is—now don’t tell anybody—it is this: that next year, commencing [p. 477] with the November number, we are going to enlarge the Magazine to DOUBLE its present size. Won’t that be great? Bigger pictures, bigger stories, bigger thing altogether. We guess so. Won’t the children be sorry that don’t take it—that’s all!” [2 (July 1868); pp. 476-477]

• In Aug 1868, the enlargement inspired a hint to subscribers: “In the last number of Young America, we hinted at prospective enlargement with the commencement of a new volume. This improvement has been decided upon, notwithstanding the increased expense, and have, therefore, the pleasure of announcing to our young friends that it will positively take place upon the first of November, 1868 …. This enlargement, consequent upon the prosperous state of the little Magazine, and the great encouragement it has received, will enable us to improve it in various other ways—in its pictures, puzzles, illustrated stories, in using larger, plainer type, rendering it altogether a handsomer and more important periodical. But while we are doing this at great cost to ourselves, we hope our little friends will appreciate our efforts, and assist us, by enlarging, as much as possible, the circulation of the Magazine.” [2 (Aug 1868); p. 543]

• Sept 1868 promised that the new size would “enable us to give finer pictures, clearer type, and a higher class of stories, than many of those we have been obliged to condense for so small a volume.” [2 (Sept 1868); p. 604]

• On the enlarged magazine, 1868: “With this number [Nov 1868] we commence a new and enlarged series of Young America, which we hope will prove attractive to our large and increasing class of youthful readers. The trouble of changing the form, preparing a new cover, etc., in the midst of the pressure of other business, renders this number less striking in its other features than future numbers will be.” [3 (Nov 1868); p. 35]

• The Urbana Union had stern ideas for what shouldn’t appear in a periodical for children: “[Demorest’s] not only instructs as well as pleases, but keeps from its columns all absrudities which are likely to disturb the mind of a child, such as ghost stories, fairy tales, &c. We hope the publisher will continue in this, as he has long done, and not follow the way of most children’s magazines.” [italics original] It is to be hoped that the Union missed the engraved title page for the next bound volume, which features a flight of fairies dancing in a ruined abbey to music played by imps.

• On the enlarged magazine, 1871: “This number [Jan 1871] of Young America will present itself to our young friends in its enlarged form—a change and mark of growth, which, we hope, they will appreciate and rejoice in. This will enable us to give larger pictures, finer stories, and make many other improvements that will undoubtedly please our readers, and swell our list of subscribers to twice its present proportions, though it is even now by no means inconsiderable.” [5 (Jan 1871); p. 36]

• On merging with Demorest’s Illustrated Magazine, 1875: “Juvenile magazines do not pay. Boys and girls naturally want them bright, and handsome, and interesting, but parents are not willing to pay the cost of them; therefore, there is no profit on the circulation, and as they do not attract advertising patronage, the larger the circulation the greater the loss. … [The magazine] might still have lived and grown, but for another fact in connection with juvenile periodicals; it is this—that they require constantly to find a new audience to take the place of the one which is outgrowing them, and this involves an expenditure of time, and strength, and enterprise which the net result does not warrant, and which can be put to much more profitable use.” [9 (Sept 1875); p. 277; in Lyon, p. 290] Ross includes a quote in which the Demorests mourn that the magazine failed because young readers were too adult: “They are young men and young women by the time they leave the nursery, and want grown papers, and grown books, and grown magazines …. They imbibe a taste for the horrible, the exaggerated, and marvelous, which is catered to by unscrupulous persons, and which makes all else seem insipid and namby-pamby to them.” [in Ross; p. 147]

continued by: “Young America” column in Demorest’s Monthly Magazine

source of information: 1866-1872, scattered issues and bound volumes; Lyon; American Educational Monthly ;AAS catalog; Kelly; Ross; Rowell

available: AASHistPer, series 5

bibliography:

• advertisement. The Independent 18 (27 Sept 1866); p. 3.

• “Demorest’s Young America.” The Highland Weekly News [Hillsboro, Ohio] 29 Nov 1866; p. 3.

• advertisement. American Educational Monthly 4 (Jan 1867); p. 48M.

• review. The New-England Historical and Genealogical Register 21 (Jan 1867); p. 95.

• “Literary Notices”: Demorest’s Young America. Green-Mountain Freeman [Montpelier, Vermont] 28 Aug 1867; p. 3.

• “The Writers: ‘Jennie June.’ ” The Montana Post [Virginia City, Montana] 7 Sept 1867; p. 7.

• “Literary Notes.” The Burlington Free Press [Burlington, Vermont] 31 Oct 1868; p. 6.

Geo. P. Rowell & Co’s American Newspaper Directory. New York: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1869; p. 76. [archive.org]

The Men Who Advertise. New York: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1870; p. 706. [google books]

• “Magazines for the Young.” Massachusetts Teacher and Journal of Home and School Education 23 (Jan 1870); p. 38.

• notice. Urbana Union [Urbana, Ohio] 13 July 1870; p. 3.

Geo. P. Rowell & Co.’s American Newspaper Directory. New York: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1872; p. 126. [archive.org]

• Frank Luther Mott. A History of American Magazines: vol 3, 1865-1885. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Harvard University Press, 1938. pp. 175-176.

• Eleanor Weakley Nolen. “Nineteenth Century Children’s Magazines.” The Horn Book Magazine. 15 (Jan/Feb 1939); p. 55-60.

• Betty Longenecker Lyon. “A History of Children’s Secular Magazines Published in the United States from 1789-1899.” PhD diss. Johns Hopkins, 1942; pp. 243, 286-290.

• Ishbel Ross. Crusades & Crinolines. New York: Harper & Row, 1963; pp. 145-147

Children’s Periodicals of the United States, ed. R. Gordon Kelly. Westport, Connecticut & London, England: Greenwood Press, 1984.

• Gillian Avery. Behold the Child: American Children and Their Books, 1621-1922. Baltimore, Maryland: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1994; pp. 147-148.

The Busy Bee ; 10 Nov 1866, Jan 1867-after Feb 1874

cover/masthead: 1866 | Jan-Oct 1867 | Dec 1867-1868, 1874

edited by: Covington F. Seiss, 1872

published: Germantown, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania: Orphans’ Home, for the Lutheran Association for the Publication of Religious Periodicals, 1867; publisher at the Orphans’ Home, Germantown, Pennsylvania.

• Philadelphia, Pennsylvania: the Lutheran Association for the Publication of Religious Periodicals, 1868; 1868-1870, publisher at 807 Vine St.; 1872-1874, publisher at 117 N. 6th St.

frequency: monthly

description: 4 pp.; page size, 14.25″ h x 10″ w

• 1867: prices, 1 copy, 25¢/ year; 25 copies, $5.75/ year; 50 copies, $10/ year; 100 copies, $15/ year

• 1868: prices, 1 copy, 40¢/ year; 10 copies, $2.50/ year; 25 copies, $6/ year; 50 copies, $10/ year; 75 copies, $13/ year; 100 copies, $15/ year

• 1873-1874: prices were “reduced”: 1 copy, 40¢/ year; 4 copies, each 25¢/ year; 4-25 copies, each 22¢/ year; 26-50 copies, each 20¢/ year; 51-70 copies, each 18¢/ year; 71-90 copies, each 16¢/ year; 91-100 copies, each 15¢/ year; 101-300 copies, 14¢/ year; 301+ copies, each 12¢/ year

• Religious focus: Lutheran

relevant information:

• The issue for 10 Nov 1866 was a sample issue; the Jan 1867 issue was vol 1 #1.

• Issues for 1866 and 1867 were printed at the Orphans’ Home: “[T]he Orphans’ Home, at Germantown, contemplates publishing a monthly paper, called ‘THE BUSY BEE.’ The profits derived from this enterprise will be devoted to the ‘Home.’ ” [10 Nov 1866: 1] The July 1867 issue, however, made clear that the Home was in financial trouble: “This time I must tell you, that we are in great distress. It oftimes seems to me, that there was never such a dark hour upon us, as it is just now. Our income for the last three months has been very small, and our expenses very heavy.” [1 (July 1867, p. 3] The next issue included a new address for correspondence; by Dec 1867, the Orphan’s Home was no longer listed in the masthead.

• The Orphans’ Home also did commercial printing: “JOB PRINTING OF ALL DESCRIPTIONS [i]s executed at the Orphans’ Home Printing Office, and orders from our friends will be delivered, in any part of Philadelphia by the hand of one of our boys, or elsewhere by mail or express, without charge.” [1 (July 1867); p. 4]

• The Bee did not accept advertising.

• Copies of the Bee were among objects sealed in more than one corner-stone: in the corner-stone of the Evangelical Lutheran church of the Holy Trinity in Ephrata, Pennsylvania, in 1869 [Rambler]; in that of the Sunday school building on South Duke Street in Lancaster, Pennsylvania, in 1876. [“Corner-Stone Laying”]

• Lessons on the book of Acts were published in the Bee in 1875. [“Lutheran Lesson Leaves”

relevant quote: A rebus in the sample issue asked for subscriptions and explained how the paper was put together: “The Busy [bee] where is it printed? It is printed in Philadelphia, at Leisenring’s Steam Printing House, Nos. 237 and 239 Dock Street, where excellent and cheap printing can be done. But if we are compelled to print it outside our own hive, the wings of our little Bee would soon be laden with debts, and the poor little thing would fall in the water and be drowned. … We will get all that belongs to a small printing oestablishment, with the exception of a [printer]. Our oldest boy understands type-setting. He will set the type—the form will be prepared here, and we will send it to the city to be printed. It will please you to know, that the paper you get comes from an Orphans’ Home, and that the type is set by orphan boys, and that the girls have folded the papers and prepared them to be sent to you. But you will say, this is not what it ought to be; you must have a [steam press] … There are over thirty thousand children who will receive this paper. If each of you will give but five cents … , we will get one hundred and fifty thousand cents. For this money we can buy as much type as it will take to print “The Busy Bee,” and something will be left to buy a job press, by which we could earn a great deal of money. A few days ago I received $100 for that purpose.” [10 Nov 1866: 4]

source of information: 1866-1868, 1874, scattered bound issues; Rowell; AAS catalog

available: AASHistPer, series 5

bibliography:

Geo. P. Rowell & Co’s American Newspaper Directory. New York: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1869; p. 99. [archive.org]

• Rambler. “Corner-Stone Laying.” The Daily Evening Express [Lancaster, Pennsylvania] 9 June 1869; p. 2.

The Men Who Advertise. New York: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1870; p. 735. [google books]

Geo. P. Rowell & Co.’s American Newspaper Directory. New York: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1872; p. 161. [archive.org]

• “Lutheran Lesson Leaves.” Reading Times [Reading, Pennsylvania] 29 May 1875; p. 4.

• “Corner-Stone Laying.” Intelligencer Journal [Lancaster, Pennsylvania] 14 Aug 1876; p. 2.

The Youth’s Monitor ; Dec 1866-1867

edited by: James M. Guthrie

published: Delaware, Ohio: James M. Guthrie

frequency: monthly

description: Temperance focus

relevant information:

• Listed among Guthrie’s publications in March 1867

• Though newspaper editors mention seeing copies of the Monitor, none have been identified in any sources

• Guthrie lectured on his time in a Southern prisoner of war camp before establishing several periodicals, including the Golden Era (Delaware, Ohio; 1865-1867; published weekly), The Teetotaler (Delaware, Ohio; 1867), The Reveille (Westerville, Ohio; 1867), and The Student (Delaware, Ohio; 1867; published for students at the Ohio Wesleyand University and the Ohio Wesleyan Female College)—none of which have left any trace in library collections. He was State Temperance Lecturer in 1867. By 1869, he was a dealer in oil lamps.

relevant quotes:

• The Daily Ohio Statesman describes the Monitor as “devoted to the instruction and entertainment of the young, and the inculcation of moral and temperance principles.” [31 Dec 1866]

• The Weekly Marysville Tribune calls it “a friendly Monitor for children.” [16 Jan 1867]

source of information: notices, etc., below

bibliography:

• “Free Lecture To-Night.” Cleveland Daily Leader [Cleveland, Ohio] 20 Feb 1865; p. 4.

• “New Paper.” [the Golden Era] The States and Union [Ashland, Ohio] 25 Oct 1865; p. 3.

• “The Youth’s Monitor.” Daily Ohio Statesman [Columbus, Ohio] 31 Dec 1866; p. 2.

• “Youth’s Monitor.” The Weekly Marysville Tribune [Marysville, Ohio] 16 Jan 1867; p. 3.

• “The Teetotaler.” The Weekly Marysville Tribune [Marysville, Ohio] 30 Jan 1867; p. 3.

• “Temperance Meetings.” Bucyrus Journal [Bucyrus, Ohio] 2 March 1867; p. 2.

• “New Papers.” [The Student; The Reveille] Daily Ohio Statesman [Columbus, Ohio] 20 July 1867; p. 3.

• “Local Notices: No More Murdering.” Delaware Gazette [Delaware, Ohio] 24 Sept 1869; p. 3.

Die Christliche Kinderzeitung (Christian children’s newspaper); 1867-1885?

edited by: Karl Kissling

published: St. Louis, Missouri: A. Wiebusch & Son Printing Co.

frequency: semimonthly

description: Religious focus: German Evangelical Synod of North America

• German-language periodical

source of information: Arndt; Fraser

bibliography:

• Karl J. R. Arndt & May E. Olson. German-American Newspapers and Periodicals: 1732-1955. Heidelberg: Quelle & Meyer Publishers, 1961.

• Sybille Fraser. “German Language Children’s and Youth Periodicals in North America: A Checklist.” Phaedrus 6 (Spring 1979); pp. 27-31.

The Guardian Angel ; 1867-after 1884

edited by: 1868: James O’Reilly; Martin I. J. Griffin; William F. Cook

• 1884: John Arthur Henry; Daniel F. Gillin

published: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania: Gillin, McGuegan & Griffin, 1869.

• Philadelphia, Pennsylvania: Gillin, McGuigan & Griffin, 1870; publisher at 706 Chestnut St.

• Philadelphia, Pennsylvania: Gillin & McGuigan, 1872; publisher at 706 Chestnut St.

• Philadelphia, Pennsylvania: Daniel F. Gillin, 1884; publisher at 717 Sansom St.

frequency: monthly

description: 8 pp.; price, 50¢/ year

• Page size: 1869, 28″ h x 21″ w. 1870, 24″ h x 19″ w. 1872, 26″ h x 20″ w

• Circulation: 1870, 42,000. 1872, 25,000

• Religious focus: Catholic

relevant quote: On the printing office: “The first number was issued from the old United States Hotel, and the publishers, in 1868, bought the printing-office at No. 701 Chestnut Street.” [Schaf]

relevant quote: The Angel claimed to “[circulate] in every State and territory, also Canada and West Indies”; it also stated that it was “the pioneer of catholic juvenile monthlies”. (It wasn’t.) [Rowell 1872; p. 162]

source of information: Rowell; Griffin; Scharf

available:

• The Feb 1868 and Sept 1868 issues of the Angel included stories by Maurice F. Egan, who later published works of fiction and nonfiction and was appointed U. S. Minister to Denmark; the stories were reprinted in The American Catholic Historical Researches, 1910. [Martin I. J. Griffin. “An Ambassador‘s First Printed Stories.” Philadelphia, Pennsylvania: Martin I. J. Griffin, 1910; pp. 336-339. [google books]

bibliography:

Geo. P. Rowell & Co’s American Newspaper Directory. New York: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1869; p. 100. [archive.org]

The Men Who Advertise. New York: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1870; p. 736. [google books]

Geo. P. Rowell & Co.’s American Newspaper Directory. New York: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1872; p. 162. [archive.org]

• J. Thomas Scharf and Thompson Westcott. History of Philadelphia, 1609-1884. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania: L. H. Everts & Co., 1884; vol 3, p. 2038. [google books]

• Thomas C. Middleton. “Catholic Periodicals Published in the United States.” Records of the American Catholic Historical Society of Philadelphia. N.p.: American Catholic Historical Society of Philadelphia, 1908; vol 19, p. 37. [google books]

• Martin I. J. Griffin. “An Ambassador‘s First Printed Stories.” in The American Catholic Historical Researches, 1910. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania: Martin I. J. Griffin, 1910; pp. 336-339. [google books]

The Sparkling Gem ; 1867-after 1868

edited by: Mrs. M. M. B. Goodwin

published: Indianapolis, Indiana: A. Q. Goodwin; publisher at Box 1174

frequency: monthly

description: 16 pp.; octavo; price, 50¢/ year

• Temperance focus

source of information: Rowell; Little Chief

bibliography:

• notice. Indiana School Journal 13 (Jan 1868); p. 42. [google books]

• notice. The Little Chief 2 (April 1868); p. 63.

Geo. P. Rowell & Co’s American Newspaper Directory. New York: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1869; p. 29. [archive.org]

Young Americans ; 1867-1904

published: Albany, New York

source of information: Kelly

bibliography:

Children’s Periodicals of the United States, ed. R. Gordon Kelly. Westport, Connecticut & London, England: Greenwood Press, 1984.

The Children’s Hour ; Jan 1867-June 1874

cover/masthead: 1867-1870

edited by: Timothy Shay Arthur

published: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania: T. S. Arthur & Son, Jan 1867-June 1874; publisher at 323 Walnut St., 1866; publisher at 809 & 811 Chestnut St., 1867, Feb 1869-1870

frequency: monthly; 2 vol/ year

description: Jan 1867-1870, 32 pp.; page size untrimmed, 7.75″ h x 6″ w. Prices: 1 copy, $1.25/ year; 15¢/ issue; 5 copies, $5/ year; 10 copies, $10/ year

• 1871, 40 pp.

relevant information:

• The sample issue was available Nov 1866; it is dated Jan 1867.

• The bound volume of the first year was available “bound in green and gold” for Christmas. [Philadelphia Inquirer 16 Dec 1867]

• In 1870, the Hour had a supplement printing nine Christmas carols.

relevant quotes:

• From the first description: “The Children’s Hour will not be the rival of any other juvenile periodical, but have its own distinctive features, and address itself to the work of helping the little ones to take their first step in life safely and pleasantly, in its own peculiar way. It will be the mother’s assistant, as well as the child’s companion, friend, and counsellor.” [“T. S. Arthur’s New Magazine for Children”]

• On the editor: “The reputation of the editor is a sufficient guaranty [sic] that its pages will contain nothing hurtful or unwholesome to the pure and tender minds of youth.” [Highland Weekly News 15 Nov 1866]

• On the title: “We are indebted to Mr. Longfellow for the beautiful title of our magazine. It was suggested by his exquisite poem, “The Children’s Hour,” one of the sweetest in our language, and its quotation here is a fitting introduction to our new periodical, which is to be specially for the children.” [“The Title of Our Magazine.” 1 (Jan 1867): inside front cover (cover page 2)]

• The magazine’s focus was made clear in its advertisements: “Our new Magazine will come as a pleasant companion, friend and counsellor of the little ones; and as a helper in the work of storing up things good and true, and beautiful in their minds, through a healthy culture of the imagination and an attractive illustration of those precepts that lie at the foundation of all right living. It will aim to inspire children with reverence for God and a sense of His loving and fatherly care; and to lead them to unselfish actions—to be gentle, forbearing, merciful, just, pure, brave, and peaceable.” [1 (Jan 1867): inside back cover (cover page 3)]

• The issues for Jan and Feb 1867 were made available early: “The first number of our magazine was issued in advance of the date, so as to get it well before the public in time for the subscribing season. This number also anticipates the regular date, though not so much as the first, in order that our little friends, (we number them already by thousands) may not be kept waiting too long for a second visit from the “Children’s Hour.” [“Our Second Number.” 1 (Feb 1867): inside front cover (cover page 2)]

• Writers were to take their audience seriously: “Bear in mind, that the CHILDREN’S HOUR is for the “Little Ones,” and in writing for them, avoid as far as possible, the use of very long words, and of those not in common use, and especially avoid idioms and slang phrases. The thought need not be puerile, nor the language ‘babyish.’ Children understand higher things than many grown people imagine; but then, you must reach their understandings through words with which they are familiar. If they do not know the exact meaning of the language used, you will fail in your attempt to interest and instruct them. Write with care; with just as much care in the composition of your sentences, as if you were writing with a view to literary criticism. There is an appearance of haste, and a slovenliness, about a great deal of the manuscript we receive, as if the writers thought that anything would do for children. … As you write, bring before you, in imagination, a group of children, and try to feel for them an interest that goes beyond their mere entertainment for the hour. Write as cheerfully, lovingly, and tenderly as you please. Make them as happy as you can; keep their sky as free from clouds and rain as you can; only, leave them with an influence for good. Teach them something that, if kept in mind, will help them to become better men and women.” [“To Correspondents.” 1 (April 1867): inside front cover (cover page 2)]

• There was some criticism: “So far as the letter press is concerned, the number is excellent, but pictorially it is by no means so attractive as usual.” [Philadelphia Inquirer 18 May 1871]

• Even as a Louisiana paper advertised the Hour (with an advertisement for the year before), the magazine’s merger with St. Nicholas was being announced: “[Arthur’s] ‘Children’s Hour’ has won golden opinions, but he has turned it over to ‘Saint Nicholas,’ with 10,000 subscribers, by way of concentrating the resources of wholesome children’s literature where they will do the most good, i. e, in the strongest hands.” [Vidi. “Our New York Letter”] “No doubt the subscribers of the Children’s Hour will be glad of this change,” the St. Joseph Gazette commented.

absorbed by: St. Nicholas Magazine ; Nov 1873-Feb 1940, 1943

source of information: Jan 1867-Dec 1870, scattered issues; 1868 bound volume; AAS catalog; notices, etc., below

available:

• AASHistPer, series 5

• In 1867, some stories from the Children’s Hour were reprinted separately: “We have made a selection of some of the choice little stories in the “Children’s Hour,” and put them up in eight small books, each with a handsome illuminated cover”; titles: The Moth and the Candle; Willy’s Journey to Heaven; and Reading the Bible, The Motherless Boy, The Sick Child; and Who Took Him on the Other Side, The Child Witness, The Sunny Maple, Into the Sunshine; and Afraid in the Dark, and A Little Gentleman. [2 (June 1867): inside front cover (cover page 2)]

bibliography:

• “Mr. Arthur’s New Magazine for Children.” The Topeka Tribune [Topeka, Kansas] 19 Oct 1866; p. 2. Also, The Highland Weekly News [Hillsboro, Ohio] 25 Oct 1866; p. 3; The Enterprise and Vermonter [Vergennes, Vermont] 9 Nov 1866; p. 2.

• “T. S. Arthur’s New Magazine for Children.” Godey’s Lady’s Book and Magazine 73 (Nov 1866); p. 450. Also, The Topeka Tribune [Topeka, Kansas] 19 Oct 1866; p. 2.

• “A New Philadelphia Periodical.” The Philadelphia Inquirer [Philadelphia, Pennsylvania] 6 Nov 1866; p. 3.

• “The Children’s Hour.” Rutland Daily Herald [Rutland, Vermont] 6 Nov 1866; p. 3.

• “The Children’s Hour.” The Burlington Free Press [Burlington, Vermont] 8 Nov 1866; p. 2.

• advertisement. Vermont Chronicle [Bellows Falls, Vermont] 10 Nov 1866; p. 8.

• “A New Children’s Magazine.” Wisconsin State Journal [Madison, Wisconsin] 13 Nov 1866; p. 1.

• “The Children’s Hour.” The Highland Weekly News [Hillsboro, Ohio] 15 Nov 1866; p. 3.

• “Second Number of the Children’s Hour.” Green-Mountain Freeman [Montpelier, Vermont] 9 Jan 1867; p. 2.

• “The Magazines for May.” Bellows Falls Times [Bellows Falls, Vermont] 3 May 1867; p. 2.

• “Literary Notices.” Perrysburg Journal [Perrysburg, Ohio] 31 May 1867; p. 2.

• notice. Southern Cultivator 25 (Oct 1867); p. 328.

• “Literary Notices.” Perrysburg Journal [Perrysburg, Ohio] 25 Oct 1867; p. 3.

• “The Children’s Hour, Edited by T. S. Arthur.” The Jackson Standard [Jackson, Ohio] 14 Nov 1867; p. 3. Also, The Enterprise and Vermonter [Vergennes, Vermont] 15 Nov 1867; p. 1.

• “The Children’s Hour.” The Philadelphia Inquirer [Philadelphia, Pennsylvania] 16 Dec 1867; p. 2.

• advertisement. Staunton Spectator [Staunton, Virginia] 17 Dec 1867; p. 1.

• “The Childrens [sic] Hour for 1868.” Steuben Republican [Angola, Indiana] 2 Jan 1868; p. 1.

• notice of Feb issue. Daily Ohio Statesman [Columbus, Ohio] 24 Jan 1868; p. 3.

• notice. The Children’s Friend (West Chester, Pennsylvania) 3 (Eleventh month 1868); p. 356. online

• “Children’s Magazines.” The St. Johnsbury Caledonian [St. Johnsbury, Vermont] 13 Nov 1868; p. 2.

Geo. P. Rowell & Co’s American Newspaper Directory. New York: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1869; p. 99. [archive.org]

• advertisement. New England Farmer [Boston, Massachusetts] 6 Nov 1869; p. 3. Also, Vermont Christian Messenger [Montpelier, Vermont] 11 Nov 1869; p. 3.

The Men Who Advertise. New York: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1870; p. 735. [google books]

• “The Children’s Hour.” The Philadelphia Inquirer [Philadelphia, Pennsylvania] 23 Aug 1870; p. 3.

• notice. The Christian World 21 (Oct 1870); p. 327.

• “Carols for Christmas.” Raleigh Christian Advocate [Raleigh, North Carolina] 9 Nov 1870; p. 3.

• advertisement. The McArthur Enquirer [McArthur, Ohio] 7 Dec 1870; p. 2.

• notice. Christian World 22 (Jan 1871); p. 28.

• “The Children’s Hour.” The Philadelphia Inquirer [Philadelphia, Pennsylvania] 18 May 1871; p. 3.

• “The Childrens’ [sic] Hour.” Wood County Reporter [Grand Rapids, Wisconsin] 25 May 1871; p. 3.

• notice. Christian World 22 (June 1871); p. 207.

• notice. Western Home Journal [Lawrence, Kansas] 6 July 1871; p. 2.

• “The Children’s Hour.” The Representative [Fox Lake, Wisconsin] 7 July 1871; p. 2.

• “The Children’s Hour.” St. Joseph Herald [St. Joseph, Michigan] 2 Dec 1871; p. 2. Also, Bellows Falls Times [Bellows Falls, Vermont] 8 Dec 1871; p. 2.

Geo. P. Rowell & Co.’s American Newspaper Directory. New York: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1872; p. 161. [archive.org]

• advertisement. The Star and Enterprise [Newville, Pennsylvania] 25 Jan 1872; p. 4.

• notice. Christian World 23 (June 1872); p. 199.

• “The Children’s Hour.” The Daily State Journal [Alexandria, Virginia] 26 Oct 1872; p. 2.

• Vidi. “Our New York Letter.” The Buffalo Commercial [Buffalo, New York] 4 May 1874; p. 2.

• “St. Nicholas and the Children’s Hour.” The St. Joseph Gazette [St. Joseph, Missouri] 19 May 1874; p. 4.

• advertisement for 1873. The Ouachita Telegraph [Monroe, Louisiana] 22 May 1874; p. 1.

• “The July Magazines.” Argus and Patriot [Montpelier, Vermont] 16 July 1874; p. 4.

• Betty Longenecker Lyon. “A History of Children’s Secular Magazines Published in the United States from 1789-1899.” PhD diss. Johns Hopkins, 1942; pp. 244, 296-298, 318.

Children’s Periodicals of the United States, ed. R. Gordon Kelly. Westport, Connecticut & London, England: Greenwood Press, 1984.

The Little Chief ; Jan 1867-Feb 1872

cover/masthead: 1871

edited by: Jan 1867-?, W. W. Dowling • 1868?-1871, A. C. Shortridge • 1870, “Laura Spring” • 1871, W. J. Button

published: Indianapolis, Indiana: Dowling & Shortridge, 1867-1868.

• Indianapolis, Indiana: Shortridge & Alden, Feb-June 1869.

• Indianapolis, Indiana: A. C. Shortridge, July 1869-June 1870.

• Indianapolis, Indiana: Shortridge & Button, July 1870-May 1871.

• Indianapolis, Indiana: Shortridge, Button & Hanley, June-July 1871.

• Indianapolis, Indiana: Button & Hanley, Aug-Oct 1871.

• Indianapolis, Indiana: Button & Hobbs, Jan-Feb 1872.

frequency: monthly; 1 vol per year

description:

• 1867: 16 pp.; price, 75¢/ year

• 1868: price, 75¢/ year

• 1871: 32 pp.; page size, 10″ h x 7″ w; price, 75¢/ year

• Circulation: 1870, 5,000; 1872, 4,000

relevant information:

• The contents of the July 1868 issue were printed in the Bucyrus Journal [Bucyrus, Ohio; 31 July 1868; p. 3]

relevant quotes:

• On the founding: “Nearly four years ago Prof. Shortridge, the Superintendent of the Public Schools of Indianapolis, feeling that there was a large field in our midst and throughout the country for a magazine for boys and girls, commenced the publication of the Little Chief. He realized that a very large proportion of the periodical literature of the country is not at all adopted to our youth, and that much of that which is designed especially for them, to say the least of it, is unprofitable reading. In entering upon the publication of the Little Chief it was his design to furnish them with a companion which should at once be interesting and profitable.” [“The Little Chief—A Valuable Magazine”]

• The Chief “aims to be a pleasant and entertaining companion and counsellor of the young, and labors to instil into their minds a love for the things that are true, honest, just, pure, lovely, and of good report. To this end, it contains Poems, Stories, and Letters; Dialogues, Declamations, and Songs; Game Charades, Enigmas, Puzzles, and Problems[.]” [Hancock Democrat 11 April 1867]

• While notices claim that the magazine was “an excellent Day school Monthly” [Iola Register 9 Dec 1868], the New York Times felt that “it might be a welcome visitor in Sunday Schools, though it is a little dida[c]tic for what the boy and girl of the period call ‘everyday reading.’ ”

source of information: Feb 1871 issue; AAS catalog; NUC; notices, etc., below

available: AASHistPer, series 5

bibliography:

• notice. Massachusetts Teacher and Journal of Home and School Education 20 (Feb 1867); p. 72.

• notice. Ohio Educational Monthly 16 (Feb 1867); p. 72.

• advertisement. The Hancock Democrat [Greenfield, Indiana] 11 April 1867; p. 3.

• “The Little Chief.” The Orangeburg News [Orangeburg, South Carolina] 16 Nov 1867; p. 2.

• notice. Evening Post [New York, New York] 27 Dec 1867; p. 2.

• “The Little Chief.” The Burlington Patriot [Burlington, Kansas] 21 March 1868; p. 2.

• “Our Book Table.” Bucyrus Journal [Bucyrus, Ohio] 31 July 1868; p. 3.

• “November Juvenile Magazines.” Fort Wayne Daily Gazette [Fort Wayne, Indiana] 20 Nov 1868; p. 4.

• “The Little Chief.” The Leavenworth Times [Leavenworth, Kansas] 1 Dec 1868; p. 4.

• “The Little Chief.” The Iola Register [Iola, Kansas] 9 Dec 1868; p. 2. Also, “The Little Chief.” Wyandotte Commercial Gazette [Kansas City, Kansas] 2 Jan 1869; p. 2.

• notice. Fort Wayne Daily Gazette [Fort Wayne, Indiana] 18 Dec 1868; p. 4.

• notice. The Independent 20 (24 Dec 1868); p. 6.

• notice. The New York Times [New York, New York] 23 Feb 1869; p. 2.

• notice. The Western Observer [Washington, Kansas] 8 April 1869; p. 1.

• notice. The Chicago Republican [Chicago, Illinois] 15 Aug 1869; p. 2.

• “The Little Chief.” The Leavenworth Times [Leavenworth, Kansas] 13 Nov 1869; p. 4.

The Men Who Advertise. New York: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1870; p. 644. [google books]

• “Magazines for the Young.” Massachusetts Teacher and Journal of Home and School Education 23 (Jan 1870); p. 38.

• advertisement. The Bright Side. 2 (March 1870); p. 14.

• “The Little Chief—A Valuable Magazine.” The Noblesville Ledger [Noblesville, Indiana] 14 Sept 1870; p. 4.

• advertisement. The Herald of Health 16 (Nov 1870); advertising section p. 37.

• advertisement. The Noblesville Ledger [Noblesville, Indiana] 9 Nov 1870; p. 2.

• advertisement. The Eaton Democrat [Eaton, Ohio] 8 Dec 1870; p. 3.

• advertisement for the St. Cloud Journal. The St. Cloud Journal [St. Cloud, Minnesota] 2 Feb 1871; p. 2.

Geo. P. Rowell & Co.’s American Newspaper Directory. New York: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1872; p. 44. [archive.org]

• Betty Longenecker Lyon. “A History of Children’s Secular Magazines Published in the United States from 1789-1899.” PhD diss. Johns Hopkins, 1942; pp. 244-245.

The Nursery ; Jan 1867-Oct 1880

cover/masthead: 1868 | 1870-1875

edited by: Fanny P. Seavers, 1867-1868

published: Boston, Massachusetts: John L. Shorey, Jan 1867-Oct 1880; publisher at 13 Washington St., Jan 1867-Dec 1869; publisher at 36 Bromfield St., Dec 1870-1872. A source says that publisher was Boston, Massachusetts: A. Williams.

• New York, New York: American News Company, 1867.

frequency: monthly; 2 vol/ year

description: 32 pp.; page size untrimmed, 8.5″ h x 6″ w; duodecimo; price, $1.50/ year; 15¢/ issue

• Circulation: 1872, 85,000

• Intended for “youngest readers,” the magazine featured tiny stories in large type; some included pronunciation guides. Each page had at least one illustration.

• Copyrighted by Fanny P. Seavers, 1867; copyrighted by John L. Shorey, 1869, 1872

continued by: Our Little Ones and the Nursery ; Nov 1880-April 1899

relevant quotes:

The Nursery appears to have had a different name when first proposed: “One of the numerous new juvenile periodicals projected here, [Boston, Massachusetts] the one for very young readers to be edited by Miss Seaverns, [sic] on the plan of the London ‘Infant’s Magazine,’ has changed its name from that originally announced, which was closely copied by a New York Publisher who contrived to be first in the field, to “The Nursery Magazine.’ ” [“From Boston”] Given that Demorest’s Young America began in Nov 1866, the original title may have been “Young America.”

• One editor appeared to feel that adults could get as much entertainment out of the magazine as children: “It is just the thing for young children beginning to take an interest in books, and stories and pictures. It is full of short, simple stories, told in an easy, natural manner, and written in words of one or two syl[l]ables. The first is large and plain, and as for the pictures—if you wish to enjoy a good, hearty laugh, send for a set of the Nursery and look at the ‘Sick Doll,’ ‘I’ve been a Maying,’ ‘A Hard Day’s Wash,’ and many others, which cannot fail to delight you if you have the slightest appreciation of humor. They are executed by Oscar Plitech, who is unequalled in his happy gift of sketching children. If you wish your child to learn to read rapidly, the Nursery will do more to effect it than half a year’s schooling.” [Cultivator]

• The editor of The Literary World mourned the end of the Nursery in 1881: “We are sorry to lose the Nursery by absorption into Our Little Ones, a new Boston monthly. The Nursery has been too good, too long a visitor into our homes, and too valuable in every respect, thus to relinquish its identity.” [“News and Notes”]

source of information: 1867-1869, 1871-1872 scattered issues and bound volumes; Lyon; Kelly; Rowell

available: AASHistPer, series 5

• microfilm: Nineteenth-Century Children’s Periodicals. Westport, Connecticut: Greenwood Press, 1979.

bibliography:

• notice. Chicago Tribune [Chicago, Illinois] 18 Nov 1866; p. 2. Also, 19 Nov 1866; p. 2.

• “New Publications.” Hartford Courant [Hartford, Connecticut] 2 Jan 1867; p. 6.

• The Nursery is the title. Green-Mountain Freeman [Montpelier, Vermont] 16 Jan 1867; p. 2.

• The Nursery. The St. Johnsbury Caledonian [St. Johnsbury, Vermont] 18 Jan 1867; p. 2.

• “The Nursery.” Monmouth Democrat [Freehold, New Jersey] 24 Jan 1867; p. 2.

• “The Nursery.” The Buffalo Commercial [Buffalo, New York] 4 March 1867; p. 3.

• “Literary Notices.” Perrysburg Journal [Perrysburg, Ohio] 31 May 1867; p. 2.

• notice. Southern Cultivator 25 (Oct 1867); p. 328.

• “Literary Notes.” The Burlington Free Press [Burlington, Vermont] 31 Oct 1868; p. 6.

• “Children’s Magazines.” The St. Johnsbury Caledonian [St. Johnsbury, Vermont] 13 Nov 1868; p. 2.

Geo. P. Rowell & Co’s American Newspaper Directory. New York: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1869; p. 46. [archive.org]

• “The Nursery.” The Jasper Weekly Courier [Jasper, Indiana] 4 June 1869; p. 2.

• “Book Notices.” Ashtabula Weekly Telegraph [Ashtabula, Ohio] 3 July 1869; p. 3.

• “The Nursery.” Chippewa Falls Democrat [Chippewa Falls, Wisconsin] 9 Sept 1869; p. 3.

• “The Nursery.” Western Reserve Chronicle [Warren, Ohio] 22 Dec 1869; p. 3.

Wentworth’s Boston Commercial Directory for 1871. Boston, Massachusetts: Wentworth & Co., 1870; p. 119. [google books]

• “Magazines for the Young.” Massachusetts Teacher and Journal of Home and School Education 23 (Jan 1870); p. 38.

• notice. The Christian Standard 5 (3 Dec 1870); p. 389.

• notice. Christian World 22 (Jan 1871); p. 28.

• “The Nursery.” Vermont Watchman and State Journal [Montpelier, Vermont] 11 Jan 1871; p. 1.

• notice. Christian World 22 (May 1871); p. 175.

• notice. Christian World 22 (June 1871); p. 207.

• The children’s favorite magazine. The United Opinion [Bradford, Vermont] 2 June 1871; p. 2.

• “Literary Notices: The Nursery.” For Everybody [Buffalo, New York] 1 Dec 1871; p. 15.

• The best child’s paper ever published. Waterville Telegraph [Waterville, Kansas] 1 Dec 1871; p. 2.

Geo. P. Rowell & Co.’s American Newspaper Directory. New York: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1872; p. 75. [archive.org]

• “The Nursery.” Wood County Reporter [Grand Rapids, Wisconsin] 23 May 1872; p. 3.

• notice. Christian World 23 (June 1872); p. 199.

• The Nursery, for January. The Boston Globe [Boston, Massachusetts] 28 Dec 1872; p. 1.

• “News and Notes.” The Literary World 12 (8 Oct 1881); p. 354.

• Betty Longenecker Lyon. “A History of Children’s Secular Magazines Published in the United States from 1789-1899.” PhD diss. Johns Hopkins, 1942; pp. 255, 352-355.

Children’s Periodicals of the United States, ed. R. Gordon Kelly. Westport, Connecticut & London, England: Greenwood Press, 1984.

The Riverside Magazine for Young People ; Jan 1867-Dec 1870

cover/masthead: 1867-1869

edited by: Horace Elisha Scudder

published: New York, New York: Hurd & Houghton, Jan 1867-Dec 1870.

frequency: monthly; 2 vol/ year

description: 48 pp.; large octavo; page size, 9.5″ h x 6.5″ w; prices: 25¢/ each; 1 copy, $2.50/ year; 3 copies, $6.50; 5 copies, $10; 10 copies, $20; 20 copies, $35; clergymen & teachers, $2/ year

• A copy of the Jan 1867 issue was sent in Nov 1867 to each subscriber to The Evening Post who received the paper by mail; the issue included a prospectus for the 1868 Riverside.

• Circulation: 1869, 20,000

relevant inforation:

• Contents of several issues were described in newspapers: Jan 1867: Brooklyn Daily Eagle [24 Dec 1866] March 1867: Evansville Daily Journal [8 March 1867] April 1867: Fremont Weekly Journal [29 March 1867] July 1867: Green-Mountain Freeman [26 June 1867] Jan 1868: St. Johnsbury Caledonian [3 Jan 1868] & Galveston Daily News [28 Dec 1867] March 1868: The New York Times [20 Feb 1868] April 1868: Manchester Journal [24 March 1868] Aug 1868: New York Times [21 July 1868] June 1869: Buffalo Morning Express and Illustrated Buffalo Express [28 May 1869]

• That Hans Christian Andersen’s stories were printed in the Riverside was announced in several papers.

relevant quotes:

• An early description: “The purpose of the Riverside Magazine will be to satisfy the tastes of the younger public with instructive and entertaining reading matter, attractively illustrated by competent artists. In the contributions regard will be had rather to the merit of the articles than to the previous reputation of the authors, and all sections of the country will be fully represented. History in its more popular forms will occupy a prominent place, and as appertaining to this, Narratives of Travel, Adventures in various Countries, Manners and Customs of different Nations, and such Biographical Sketches as will interest and profit the young, while the different departments of Natural History and Science will receive their due share of attention.” [Philadelphia Inquirer 5 Nov 1866]

• Conclusion: “I hope the children who have read the ‘Riverside’ for four years are as sorry to have it come to an end as I am. But it is a great deal better to have a good thing and enjoy it, than to be missing things and grieving over not having them. You have had the ‘Riverside’ for four years, and I believe you have enjoyed it, for I have not yet seen the boy or girl who ‘hates that old Magazine.’ I have seen a great many who like it thoroughly, and many pleasant letters from old and young make me believe it, whether I want to or not, and I want to. Now you will never have a fifth volume of the ‘Riverside,’ so enjoy the four! And I have had four or five years of pleasure, editing this Magazine. Nobody can take those away from me. I have made friends by it that I hope never to lose. I do not expect to edit any more magazines for young people, but I mean to enjoy the recollection of the days when I edited the ‘Riverside,’ and had the pleasure every month of seeing its bright cover flying away, with its treasure of story and verse and picture, to gladden the eyes of children whom I never should see. If the Editor of ‘Scribner’s Monthly’ and my grown up family are as good friends as we have been, nobody could ask more.” [“Good-by.” 4 (Dec 1870); p. 575]

• The editor of the Christian Union sympathized with Riverside’s young readers: “In absorbing the Riverside Magazine, the new Scribner’s Monthly has laid itself open, we fear, to a good deal of criticism from that large portion of the public, whose indignation is none the less poignant because it is concealed under pinafores and jackets. The young folks did like the Riverside, even if their patronage was insufficient to keep it going: they loved the rich and glowing cover which enclosed it, the choice engravings wherewith it abounded: the delightful stories and the exquisite essays which it enshrined, above all they loved Mr. Scudder, its editor, whose tales were apples of gold in pictures of silver, or a dish of red strawberries smothered in cream, or whatever in peach orchard or vine-land is fragrant and juicy, and unutterably delicious. Where did all the subscribers go, that Riverside should thus flit away in the witching hours of December? Has Mr. Scudder become a sort of modern Pied Piper, gathering all the bright-faced ones by the melody of his pipings into the wind-swept plains of Cambridge, and then spiriting them away into unseen caves amid the imperceptible mountains of the Charles River? If he will tell them more, and yet more, of Dream Children, they will be content even if giant Scribner has swallowed up their own dear Riverside.” [“Literary Notes”]

• Four years after Riverside’s demise, readers ranked it second among the “modern American juvenile magazines” in an unscientific poll reported in The Literary World [5 (1 Aug 1874); p. 45]

merged with: Scribner’s Monthly (for adults)

source of information: 1867-1870 bound vols & scattered issues; Lyon; Kelly; Rowell

available: AASHistPer, series 5

• APS III (1850-1900), reel 52

• excerpts in Companions of Our Youth: Stories by Women for Young People’s Magazines, 1865-1900, ed. Jane Benardete and Phyllis Moe. New York: Frederick Ungar Publishing Co., 1980.

bibliography:

• The success of Our Young Folks. The New York Times [New York, New York] 15 Oct 1866; p. 2.

• A new juvenile magazine is announced. Detroit Free Press [Detroit, Michigan] 18 Oct 1866; p. 6.

• advertisement. The Philadelphia Inquirer [Philadelphia, Pennsylvania] 5 Nov 1866; p. 7.

• advertisement. The Brooklyn Daily Eagle [Brooklyn, New York] 24 Dec 1866; p. 9.

• notice. American Phrenological Journal 45 (Jan 1867); p. 30.

• The Riverside Magazine for young People. The Tuskegee News [Tuskegee, Alabama] 10 Jan 1867; p. 3.

• “New Magazines.” Appleton Post [Appleton, Wisconsin] 17 Jan 1867; p. 3.

• “The Juvenile Magazine for Young People.” Ohio Educational Monthly 16 (Feb 1867); p. 72.

• notice. Massachusetts Teacher and Journal of Home and School Education 20 (Feb 1867); p. 71.

• “Riverside Magazine.” Rutland Weekly Herald [Rutland, Vermont] 7 Feb 1867; p. 5.

• The Riverside Magazine. Bellows Falls Times [Bellows Falls, Vermont] 1 March 1867; p. 2.

• “Riverside Magazine.” The Evansville Daily Journal [Evansville, Indiana] 8 March 1867; p. 4.

• “A Capital Children’s Magazine.” Richmond Dispatch [Richmond, Virginia] 26 March 1867; p. 2.

• “The Riverside Magazine for Young People.” The Fremont Weekly Journal [Fremont, Ohio] 29 March 1867; p. 3.

• “The Magazines for May.” Bellows Falls Times [Bellows Falls, Vermont] 3 May 1867; p. 2.

• “Literary Notices.” Green-Mountain Freeman [Montpelier, Vermont] 26 June 1867; p. 2.

• ”Periodicals for August.” The Evansville Daily Journal [Evansville, Indiana] 27 July 1867; p. 4.

• The September number. Richmond Dispatch [Richmond, Virginia] 28 Aug 1867; p. 2.

• The Riverside Magazine for Young People, for September. Green-Mountain Freeman [Montpelier, Vermont] 28 Aug 1867; p. 3.

• The Riverside Magazine for Young People, for October. The Weekly Free Press [Atchison, Kansas] 28 Sept 1867; p. 3.

• notice. Southern Cultivator 25 (Oct 1867); p. 328-329.

• “The Riverside Magazine for Young People.” The Highland Weekly News [Hillsboro, Ohio] 21 Nov 1867; p. 3.

• “The Riverside.” The Galveston Daily News [Galveston, Texas] 28 Dec 1867; p. 2.

• “The Riverside.” The St. Johnsbury Caledonian [St. Johnsbury, Vermont] 3 Jan 1868; p. 1.

• advertisement. Tennessee Baptist [Memphis, Tennessee] 18 Jan 1868; p. 6.

• “Magazines for March.” The New York Times 20 Feb 1868; p. 2.

• “New Publications.” The Manchester Journal [Manchester, Vermont] 24 March 1868; p. 2.

• “Riverside Magazine for Young People.” The Morning Star and Catholic Messenger [New Orleans, Louisiana] 3 May 1868; p. 4.

• advertisement. The Brooklyn Union [Brooklyn, New York] 13 June 1868; p. 3.

• “Magazines for August.” New York Times [New York, New York] 21 July 1868; p. 2.

• “Hans Andersen, and The Riverside Magazine.” New England Farmer [Boston, Massachusetts] 31 Oct 1868; p. 3.

• “Literary Items.” The Evening Telegraph [Philadelphia, Pennsylvania] 5 Nov 1868; p. 3.

• “Children’s Magazines.” The St. Johnsbury Caledonian [St. Johnsbury, Vermont] 13 Nov 1868; p. 2.

Geo. P. Rowell & Co’s American Newspaper Directory. New York: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1869; p. 78. [archive.org]

• “Literary and Personal.” The Buffalo Commercial [Buffalo, New York] 12 March 1869; p. 1.

• “Review of New Books.” The Evening Telegraph [Philadelphia, Pennsylvania] 27 March 1869; p. 6.

• “Juvenile Magazines.” Buffalo Morning Express and Illustrated Buffalo Express [Buffalo, New York] 28 May 1869; p. 2.

• notice of Dec issue. Portland Transcript 33 (27 Nov 1869); p. 274.

The Men Who Advertise. New York: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1870; p. 707. [google books]

• “Magazines for the Young.” Massachusetts Teacher and Journal of Home and School Education 23 (Jan 1870); p. 37.

• notice. Western Rural 8 (13 Jan 1870); p. 16.

• notice of March issue. Churchman 4 (5 March 1870); p. 79.

• notice of August issue. Wisconsin State Journal [Madison, Wisconsin] 30 July 1870; p. 2.

• notice. The Christian World 21 (Oct 1870); p. 327.

• “Literary Notes.” The Christian Union 3 Dec 1870; p. 343.

• “Literary.” The Brooklyn Union [Brooklyn, New York] 1 March 1871; p. 1.

• comment on demise. The Literary World 5 (1 June 1874); p. 15.

• young readers rate. The Literary World 5 (1 Aug 1874); p. 45.

• “Literary Notes.” The Brooklyn Citizen [Brooklyn, New York] 22 May 1898; p. 20.

• “Literary Boston Anxious About Illness of Horace E. Scudder.” Boston Post [Boston, Massachusetts] 30 Nov 1901; p. 7.

• H. E. Scudder Passes Away.” Boston Post [Boston, Massachusetts] 12 Jan 1902; p. 1.

• Eleanor Weakley Nolen. “Nineteenth Century Children’s Magazines.” The Horn Book Magazine. 15 (Jan/Feb 1939); pp. 55-60.

• Mabel F. Altstetter. “Early American Magazines for Children.” Peabody Journal of Education 19 (Nov 1941); p. 133.

• Betty Longenecker Lyon. “A History of Children’s Secular Magazines Published in the United States from 1789-1899.” PhD diss. Johns Hopkins, 1942; pp. 244, 299-301, 377.

• Ellen B. Ballou, “Horace Elisha Scudder and the Riverside Magazine.” Harvard Library Bulletin, 14 (Autumn 1960); pp. 426-452.

• R. Gordon Kelly. Mother was a Lady. Westport, Connecticut: Greenwood Press, 1974.

Children’s Periodicals of the United States, ed. R. Gordon Kelly. Westport, Connecticut & London, England: Greenwood Press, 1984.

• Gillian Avery. Behold the Child: American Children and Their Books, 1621-1922. Baltimore, Maryland: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1994; pp. 148-150.

• Selma Lanes. “A Literary Correspondence Between H. E. Scudder and H. C. Andersen.” The Horn Book Magazine 65 (1989); pp. 39-47, 186-193. Reprinted in Through the Looking Glass. Boston, Massachusetts: David R. Godine, 2004; pp. 65-84.

Southern Boys’ and Girls’ Monthly ; Jan 1867-July 1868

cover/masthead: 1867 | 1868

edited by: Ebenezer Thompson Baird; William Logan Baird

• William was supposed to move from Baltimore, Maryland, to Richmond, Virginia, in order to co-edit the Monthly; however, he was unable to leave Baltimore, and Ebenezer was sole editor in 1867. [“The Close of the Volume.” 1 (Dec 1867); pp. 412-413]

published: Richmond, Virginia: White & Howard, Jan-March 1867; publisher at 1011 Main St., 1867.

• Richmond, Virginia: Messrs. Baird & J. W. Turner, April-Sept 1867; publisher at No. 20, 13th St.

• Richmond, Virginia: Messrs. Baird, May-Dec 1867; publishers at 1011 Main St.

• Richmond, Virginia: Baird & Brother, Jan-July 1868.

• Baltimore, Maryland: Baird & Brother, Jan-July 1868.

frequency: monthly; 1 vol/ year

description: 1867: 32 pp.; octavo; price, $1.50/ year • 1868: 40 pp.; price, $1.50/ year

relevant information:

• Address in 1868 was Post Office Box 429, Richmond, Virginia, and Box 263, Baltimore, Maryland

relevant quotes:

• Though “[a]ll its contributions will be Southern,” nonsectionalism was emphasized: “It will eschew politics and theological and sectarian discussion, but it will inculcate Bible truth and Christian morality, and will be conducted on such principles as, its Editors hope, will make it an acceptable visitant to every family.” [1 (May 1867): back cover (cover page 4)] Northern readers were assured that they were welcome: “A young reader, in Pennsylvania, inquires whether it will be agreeable for her to enter into [the Monthly’s] competition; or whether the prizes are designed for Southern boys and girls alone. In answer, we inform her that we have no new conditions to make on that subject. The prizes are offered to the patrons of this Monthly; and any young member of any family taking the Monthly, North or South, is entitled to become a competitor for the prizes. … Miss F. L., of Pennsylvania, says in a postscript to a letter, ‘I hope, because I live in the North, you will not think me unfriendly to the South.’ Indeed we do not; and we rejoice to know that their are many, many more, who live in the same section, who agree with this young friend. We have personal evidence of this fact, almost every day, in the leters of sympathy and encouragement, and in the unsolicited subscribers we are obtaining from the Northern States.” [1 (May 1867); p. 188]

• Though Baird tried to exchange with other periodicals, he didn’t always succeed: “[S]ome of our exchanges have never yet mentioned the name of this Monthly, though they regularly herald the appearance of the Northern publications of a similar character. This may in part be an inadvertance; and in large part it may be owing to the irregularity of the mails. For we regret to know that some of the papers received at our office have never yet received a copy of this Monthly, though it has been regularly mailed to them. This difficulty shall be rectified, so far as it is in our power to do so: and we indulge the hope that our brethren of the press will do us the favour which we have suggested, and give such notice of our enterprise as their friendship may prompt.” [“Our Exchanges.” 1 (May 1867); p. 190]

• The first year of the Monthly was promising: “We began without any subscribers; and owing to circumstances which we could not control, we issued our first number a month later than it ought to have been issued, in order to get a proper start and to enter into fair competition with our co-temporaries. We were acting on the firm belief that such a publication was needed, and hence would be supported. In this we do not believe we were mistaken. In looking over this first year, we see much that might have been better done; but we have every reason for congratulation. All our writers have been southern, except that some articles have been translated, and some have been abridgments; but the work of translating and abridging has been done by our southern co-labourers. What we aimed at, was not the establishment of a magazine to inculcate sectionalism, to engender or perpetuate animosity; but it was our great desire to secure the development of southern talent, to aid in the cultivation of home literature. … The writers whose services we have secured vary in their degree of ability and fitness, as a matter of course. Moreover, we may as well confess it, we have indulged some of our new writers to an extent that our readers may have felt to be too great: but it was because we saw in them the genius of better things, and wished to tone them along, to encourage them to persevere. And already we begin to see reason to rejoice that we did so. Others of our writers whose pieces have adorned these pages, have had their talents lying dormant as it were until they found opportunity through our pages to make them [u]seful and entertaining to the public. Others yet were well known, their fame being as wide as our country.” [“The Close of the Volume.” 1 (Dec 1867); pp. 412-413]

• The March 1868 issue was late due to sabotage: “This number of our Monthly makes its appearance at a later day than any previous number. The reason is, that our press was broken, and we had to delay the number until the damage could be repaired. And what is more painful to state is that the damage done us was the work of malice. It is now repaired; but the vill[ai]n who did it, risking the lives of all our workmen, is still out of the penitentiary.” [2 (March 1868); p. 118]

• The Land We Love found it a “charming periodical—all that can be desired for our children. it is really wonderful that a monthly, with 40 pages of reading matter and four or five wood-cuts in each number, can be issued for $1.50 per annum. It is regarded as a rich treat in every household it enters, and parents can put it with safety in the hands of their children, feeling assured that while it contains much to instruct, there is nothing to corrupt the taste or injure the morals. In these degenerate times of beastly pictorials and wicked sensational stories, of how little can it be said that this is safe reading.”

• While the Monthly eschewed sectionalism, its supporters didn’t always comply: “We commend it to such of our friends as desire such a work, got up under the auspices of good and able men not altogether wedded to New England isms.” [Crisis]

• Editorial responsibilities led to the Monthly being absorbed by Burke’s Weekly; the merger was announced in Burke’s via a note dated 23 July 1868: “The undersigned [E. T. Baird] announces to the former friends and patrons of this Monthly, that he has this day agreed on terms with Messrs. J. W. Burke Co. for merging it into Burke’s Weekly for Boys and Girls. … We shall not detain our young friends by any extended remarks assigning reasons for this arrangement. A word is sufficient. The whole responsibility for the Monthly has rested on [E. T. Baird], who was its founder, senior editor, and sole proprietor, and he has utterly failed to find the time to give to the enterprise which he felt due to his readers, his correspondents, and himself. The distance at which the junior editor, Prof. Wm. Logan Baird, resided, rendered it impossible for him to extend the aid which was requisite to relieve this weight of responsibility. Hence, what [E. T. Baird] hoped would become a coveted means of recreation from heavy official cares, he has found, in the midst of the pressure of labor resting on him, to be an incumbrance.” [“A Card: To the Subscribers of the Southern Boys’ and Girls’ Monthly.” Burke’s Weekly for Boys and Girls 2 (15 Aug 1868); p. 52] “This will ensure a concentration of the talent of the South on one periodical,” The Orangeburg News noted, “and tend to make Burke’s Weekly even better than it has been.”

absorbed by: Burke’s Weekly for Boys and Girls • Burke’s Magazine for Boys and Girls ; 6 July 1867-Dec 1871

source of information: AASHistPer; Burke’s; notices, etc., below; Kelly; OCLC

available: AASHistPer, series 5

Martin, the Miner-Boy of Mansfeldt (Helena, Arkansas: Thomas Ward White) was reprinted from a story in the Monthly. [advertisement. Southern Planter and Farmer 3 (Dec 1869)]

bibliography:

• advertisement. Richmond Dispatch [Richmond, Virginia] 7 Jan 1867; p. 3.

• notice of Jan issue. Alexandria Gazette [Alexandria, Virginia] 10 Jan 1867; p. 2.

• notice. The Sun [Baltimore, Maryland] 12 Jan 1867; p. 2.

• “Southern Boys and Girls’ Monthly.” The Charleston Daily News [Charleston, South Carolina] 15 Jan 1867; p. 3.

• “Literary: Southern Boys’ and Girls’ Monthly.” Staunton Spectator [Staunton, Virginia] 15 Jan 1867; p. 3.

• notice of Feb issue. The Baltimore Sun [Baltimore, Maryland] 11 Feb 1867; p. 2.

• “Southern Boys & Girls’ Monthly.” The Abingdon Virginian [Abingdon, Virginia] 22 Feb 1867; p. 3.

• “Southern Boys’ and Girls’ Monthly.” Richmond Dispatch [Richmond, Virginia] 6 March 1867; p. 1.

• “Southern Boys’ and Girls’ Monthly.” Richmond Dispatch [Richmond, Virginia] 3 April 1867; p. 1.

• “The Southern Boys’ and Girls’ Monthly.” Richmond Dispatch [Richmond, Virginia] 30 Dec 1867; p. 2.

• “The Southern Boys and Girls’ Monthly.” Yorkville Enquirer [York, South Carolina] 2 Jan 1868; p. 2.

• “The Southern Boys and Girls’ Monthly.” The Aegis & Intelligencer [Bel Air, Maryland] 10 Jan 1868; p. 2.

• notice. The Charleston Mercury [Charleston, South Carolina] 16 March 1868; p. 1. Also, The Tri-Weekly Mercury [Charleston, South Carolina] 17 March 1868; p. 2.

• “Southern Boys and Girls Monthly.” Staunton Spectator [Staunton, Virginia] 17 March 1868; p. 3.

• notice of March issue. Intelligencer Journal [Lancaster, Pennsylvania] 1 April 1868; p. 2.

• review. Land We Love 5 (June 1868); p. 191.

• notice. Crisis [Columbus, Ohio] 10 June 1868; p. 168.

• “A Card: To the Subscribers of the Southern Boys’ and Girls’ Monthly.” Burke’s Weekly for Boys and Girls 2 (15 Aug 1868); p. 52.

• “Burke’s Weekly.” The Orangeburg News [Orangeburg, South Carolina] 5 Sept 1868; p. 3.

• advertisement for Martin, the Miner-boy of Hansfeldt. Daily Arkansas Gazette [Little Rock, Arkansas] 2 Dec 1868; p. 2. Also, Southern Planter and Farmer 3 (Dec 1869); p. 30.

• Betty Longenecker Lyon. “A History of Children’s Secular Magazines Published in the United States from 1789-1899.” PhD diss. Johns Hopkins, 1942; p. 144.

Children’s Periodicals of the United States, ed. R. Gordon Kelly. Westport, Connecticut & London, England: Greenwood Press, 1984.

• Gillian Avery. Behold the Child: American Children and Their Books, 1621-1922. Baltimore, Maryland: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1994; p. 148.

Sunday School Gem ; Jan 1867-after 1946

edited by: 1867, E. H. Thomas; George Ross; J. H. Redsecker

• Jan 1869-1878, J. H. Redsecker

• Jan 1879-1896, George Sigler

• 1897-after 1914, W. A. Laverty

• 1919, Joseph Martin

• 1937-1946, F. D. Rayle

published: Lancaster, Pennsylvania: E. H. Thomas, Jan 1867-1870.

• Harrisburg, Pennsylvania: H. C. Demming, 1870.

• Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, 1872.

• Harrisburg, Pennsylvania: Board of Publication of the General Eldership of the Church of God, 1882.

frequency: Jan 1867-1883, monthly

• 1884-1905, semimonthly

• 1906-after 1914, weekly

description: 1869-1872: 4 pp.; page size, 23″ h x 17″ w; price, 20¢/ year

• 1882: 4 pp.; page size, 23″ h x 16″ w; price, 25¢/ year

• Circulation: 1870, 9,000. 1872, 10,200. 1882, less than 10,000

• Religious focus: Church of God

relevant information:

• Also referred to in documents as “The Church of God Sunday-School Paper” and “The Church of God Sunday-School Gem”.

• Originally proposed in May 1860, but no committee was formed to publish it until 1866. The first name given was “The Church of God Sunday-School Paper,” which was changed by E. H. Thomas to the slightly better “The Church of God Sunday-School Gem” and, finally, to the Sunday School Gem. Publication was announced in the 3 Jan 1867 issue of The Church Advocate.

• Forney includes details of the Gem’s finances in reports of meetings of the board of elders.

• In 1870, a copy of the Gem was placed in the corner stone of the chapel on 9th St., Reading, Pennsylvania. In 1874, another copy was placed in the corner stone of the chapel being built at the corner of Nagle St. and Showers Alley, in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania.

source of information: notices, etc., below

available: AASHistPer, series 5 (1876 issue only)

bibliography:

• “The Sunday School Gem.” Intelligencer Journal [Lancaster, Pennsylvania] 1 Jan 1867; p. 2.

• notice. The Athens Weekly Post [Athens, Alabama] 7 Nov 1867; p. 3.

• J. I. Mombert. An Authentic History of Lancaster County. Lancaster, Pennsylvania: J. E. Barr & Co., 1869; p. 484.

• “General Eldership of the Church of God.” Harrisburg Telegraph [Harrisburg, Pennsylvania] 29 May 1869; p. 3.

The Men Who Advertise. New York: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1870; p. 730. [google books]

• “A Good Sunday School Paper.” Harrisburg Telegraph [Harrisburg, Pennsylvania] 1 Jan 1870; p. 3.

• “Rapidly Increasing.” Harrisburg Telegraph [Harrisburg, Pennsylvania] 28 Jan 1870; p. 3.

• notice of April issue. Harrisburg Telegraph [Harrisburg, Pennsylvania] 25 March 1870; p. 3.

• “Corner Stone Laying.” Reading Times [Reading, Pennsylvania] 10 May 1870; p. 1.

• notice of July issue. Harrisburg Telegraph [Harrisburg, Pennsylvania] 30 June 1870; p. 3.

• notice of Aug issue. Harrisburg Telegraph [Harrisburg, Pennsylvania] 28 July 1870; p. 3.

• notice of Nov issue. Harrisburg Telegraph [Harrisburg, Pennsylvania] 1 Nov 1870; p. 3.

• notice of Aug issue. Harrisburg Telegraph [Harrisburg, Pennsylvania] 28 July 1871; p. 3.

Geo. P. Rowell & Co.’s American Newspaper Directory. New York: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1872; p. 154. [archive.org]

• “The New Chapel.” Harrisburg Telegraph [Harrisburg, Pennsylvania] 6 Nov 1874; p. 4.

American Newspaper Directory. New York: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1882; p. 335. [google books]

• C. H. Forney. History of the Churches of God in the United States of North America. Harrisburg, Pennsylvania: Board of Directors of the Publishing House and Book Room of the Churches of God, 1914; pp. 830-833, also pp. 171, 175, 524, 770, 772-773, 775, 776, 778, 780, 782, 783, 784, 786, 788, 790, 792, 794, 799, 837. [google books]

• “Teacher in Sunday School.” The Evening News [Harrisburg, Pennsylvania] 20 Dec 1919; p. 16.

• “C. E. Rally.” Harrisburg Telegraph [Harrisburg, Pennsylvania] 5 Oct 1937; p. 10.

• “Churches Mark Literature Day.” The Evening News [Harrisburg, Pennsylvania] 13 Dec 1941; p. 2.

• “Rally Day Services.” The Gazette and Daily [York, Pennsylvania] 24 Oct 1946; p. 20.

Oliver Optic’s Magazine: Our Boys and Girls ; 5 Jan 1867-Dec 1873 • Oliver Optic’s Magazine ; Jan 1874-Dec 1875

cover/masthead: 1867 | 1871

edited by: William T. Adams (“Oliver Optic”)

published: Boston, Massachusetts: Lee & Shepard, 1 Nov 1867-1875; publisher at 149 Washington St.

frequency: 5 Jan 1867-1870, weekly; 2 vol/ year

• 1871-Dec 1875, monthly

description: 5 Jan-June 1867: 12 pp.; octavo; page size untrimmed, 10″ h x 6.75″ w; price, $2.25/ year

• July 1867-Dec 1870: 16 pp.; price, $2.50/ year; $1.25/ volume

• Jan 1871-1875: 64 pp.; page size untrimmed, 10″ h x 7″ w. 1871: price, 25¢/ issue; $2.50/ year

• Circulation: 1869 (from magazine), 100,000. 1870, 20,000. 1872, 22,000. 1875 (from magazine), 11,000

relevant information:

• The Enterprise and Vermonter printed the contents of 9 Feb 1867 [15 Feb 1867]

• Issues were reprinted in 1872 as Our Boys and Girls Mirror.

relevant quote: “For several years we have believed that the Young People of the United States wanted and needed a magazine which should visit them every week, instead of every month. We know what pleasure the older members of the family derive from the weekly coming of the religious, agricultural, and literary papers, and we are confident that the younger branches will experience a similar satisfaction in the frequent appearance of a publication adapted to their wants and their tastes. … We intend to furnish a magazine which shall interest and amuse Our Boys and Girls, while it makes them wiser and better. … ” [“Salutatory.” 1 (5 Jan 1867); p. 7.]

source of information: 1868-1871 bound vols & scattered issues; Lyon; Maxwell; Kelly; Rowell

available: AASHistPer, series 5

• APS II (1850-1900), reels 1850-1900

bibliography:

• “Literary World.” The Field and Fireside [Raleigh, North Carolina] 17 Nov 1866; p. 5.

• “ A New Magazine for Boys and Girls.” Green Mountain Freeman [Montpelier, Vermont] 2 Jan 1867; p. 1.

• notice. The Enterprise and Vermonter [Vergennes, Vermont] 25 Jan 1867; p. 2.

• “New Publications”: Our Boys and Girls Every Week. The Enterprise and Vermonter [Vergennes, Vermont] 15 Feb 1867; p. 2.

• “Oliver Optic’s Magazine.” The Sunbury Gazette and Northumberland County Republican [Sunbury, Pennsylvania] 19 Oct 1867; p. 3.

• notice. The Ladies’ Repository Nov 1867; p. 398. [google books]

• “Magazines for the Young.” Massachusetts Teacher and Journal of Home and School Education 23 (Jan 1870); pp. 37-38.

• notice. The Christian World 21 (Oct 1870); p. 327.

The Men Who Advertise. New York: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1870; p. 665. [google books]

Wentworth’s Boston Commercial Directory for 1871. Boston, Massachusetts: Wentworth & Co., 1870; p. 119. [google books]

• notice. Christian World 22 (Jan 1871); p. 28.

Geo. P. Rowell & Co.’s American Newspaper Directory. New York: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1872; p. 75. [archive.org]

• Harriet L. Matthews. “Children’s Magazines.” Bulletin of Bibliography. 1 (April 1899); pp. 133-136.

• Betty Longenecker Lyon. “A History of Children’s Secular Magazines Published in the United States from 1789-1899.” PhD diss. Johns Hopkins, 1942; pp. 243, 291-295, 377.

Checklist of Children’s Books, 1837-1876, comp. Barbara Maxwell. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania: Special Collections, Central Children’s Department, Free Library of Philadelphia, 1975.

Children’s Periodicals of the United States, ed. R. Gordon Kelly. Westport, Connecticut & London, England: Greenwood Press, 1984.

• Gillian Avery. Behold the Child: American Children and Their Books, 1621-1922. Baltimore, Maryland: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1994; p. 146.

The School and Fireside ; 11 Jan 1867-March 1868

edited by: George A. Chase

published: Louisville, Kentucky: Bradley & Gilbert; publisher at Box 748, 1867.

frequency: semimonthly, except July & Aug

description: 8 pp.; page size, 12.5″ h; price: Jan 1867, $1/ year; Feb 1867, $1.25

• 22 Feb 1867 is issue #3

relevant quotes:

• “From Louisville, Ky., we have received the first number of a neatly printed sheet, entitled ‘The School and Fireside; a journal for Schools and Families;’ which, as we learn from its prospectus, is the only paper of the kind published south of the Ohio River. May all success attend this pioneer in a good cause! We shall be happy to exchange with it.” [notice]

• The paper was fairly generic: “Contents—Stories, Sketches, School Dialogues, Declamations, Correspondence, School Compositions, Poetry, Problems, Enigmas, Educational Intelligence, etc. A paper for public and private schools, and the members, old and young, of the family circle—a moral and intellectual aid to teachers and parents. It is edited by Prof. G. A. CHASE, A. M., Principal of the Louisville Female High School, who has been prominently engaged as an educator for twenty years. The paper is entirely free from sentiments of a political or sectarian character.” [Courier-Journal 26 Feb 1867]

• The Ohio Educational Journal seemed surprised that a Southern periodical would be pro-Confederate: “It is the only school journal published in the country that would refer to that arch-rebel, General Lee, as ‘the truly great man whose sword was as gracefully laid aside when peace smiled, as it was gracefully and skillfully wielded while war raged.’ Neutral!” [Feb 1867]

• Unfortunately, the paper didn’t last long: “We regret to learn of the discontinuance of this excellent little journal, which Prof. Chase has been conducting for the past year for the benefits of schools and families. The receipts did not pay the expenses. these are hard times on new literary enterprises— and old ones, too.” [Louisville Daily Courier 15 March 1868]

source of information: OCLC; notices, etc., below

bibliography:

• “New School Paper.” The Louisville Daily Courier [Louisville, Kentucky] 25 Dec 1866; p. 1. Also, The Evansville Daily Journal [Evansville, Indiana] 27 Dec 1866; p. 1.

• “Educational: The School and Fireside.” The Louisville Daily Courier [Louisville, Kentucky] 14 Jan 1867; p. 2.

• notice. Massachusetts Teacher and Journal of Home and School Education 20 (Feb 1867); p. 66.

• “The School and Fireside.” Ohio Educational Monthly 16 (Feb 1867); p. 72.

• We are in receipt. The Owensboro Monitor [Owensboro, Kentucky] 6 Feb 1867; p. 3.

• “The School and Fireside.” The Courier-Journal [Louisville, Kentucky] 22 Feb 1867; p. 3.

• advertisement. The Courier-Journal [Louisville, Kentucky] 26 Feb 1867; p. 2.

• “The School and Fireside.” The Louisville Daily Courier [Louisville, Kentucky] 13 April 1867; p. 1.

• “The School and Fireside.” The Indiana School Journal 12 (May 1867); p. 174.

• The last number of the School and Fireside. The Courier-Journal [Louisville, Kentucky] 14 Sept 1867; p. 2.

• “The School and Fireside.” The Louisville Daily Courier [Louisville, Kentucky] 15 March 1868; p. 3.

Children’s BannerThe Life Boat ; April-after July 1867

cover/masthead: 1867

edited by: H. T. Hudson

published: Raleigh, North Carolina: The North Carolina Publishing Company

frequency: monthly

description: 4 pp.; page size, 16.5″ h; prices, 1 copy, 40¢; 25-49 copies, $30¢; 50+ copies, 25¢

• Circulation: May 1867, 5,000

• Religious focus

relevant quotes:

• Announcement: “The North Carolina Publishing Company propose to publish early in April next, in the city of Raleigh, N. C., a monthly paper to be called the Children’s Banner, for the use of Sabbath Schools. It will be just half the size of the Episcopal Methodist. … Now children, shall we issue 5000 copies to begin with?” [“The Children’s Banner”]

• The original name didn’t last a month: “The Child’s Paper, to be published, by the North Carolina Publishing Company as heretofore announced through the columns of the Episcopal Methodist, has been christened THE LIFE BOAT. instead of ‘The Children’s Banner.’ The April number has been published and specimen copies sent out. Our paper man failed to give us as good a quality of paper as we ordered, hence this number does not come up to our standard, but will be better in the next. … Shall we give you the reason for the change of name? Very well, then let this suffice. The name Life Boat is new—no other paper of that name, and the Boat or Ship is emblematical of many highly instructive scripture lessons. Riding is better than walking, and sailing pleasanter than forced marching. Then ho! for THE LIFE BOAT and let’s all take a ride.” [Episcopal Methodist 3 April 1867]

• From the editor: “Dear Children—on the 1st of April … just one month ago—we launched our little Life Boat upon the broad open sea of experiment. Is not every human enterprise an experiment as to whether it will accomplish in its progress and results the good, that was proposed? Still we were strong in the belief then, and we are more confirmed in it now, that the children of our good old North State, were entitled to have and that they would cheerfully support at least one paper published in this their native State, which they could call their own. Are we not right children? I believe every one of you will say yes! Well then, this is your paper, gotten up expressly for you ….” [“May.” 1 (May 1867); p. 6]

• The paper was intended as a substitute for Sunday school in winter: “J. W.—‘Will you send the Life Boat for six months?’ We dislike to say no! We are afraid to say yes, for the reason, that we want our Boat to make the round yearly trip, and not be forced into winter quarters, since we desire all the children to get it, especially during the winter months when they are deprived of Sabbath School privileges.” [“Acknowledgement of Letters”]

source of information: OCLC; notices, etc., below

available:

• May 1867 available at newspapers.com

The Episcopal Methodist reprinted “The Deformed Child,” by Minnie E. Ray, and “Edward Hall and the Snake,” by E. H. W. [3 April 1867; p. 4]

bibliography:

• “The Children’s Banner.” The Episcopal Methodist [Raleigh, North Carolina] 27 Feb 1867; p. 3.

• “The Life Boat.” The Semi-Weekly Raleigh Sentinel [Raleigh, North Carolina] 27 March 1867; p. 2.

• “The Life Boat.” The Episcopal Methodist [Raleigh, North Carolina] 3 April 1867; p. 3.

• advertisement. The Episcopal Methodist [Raleigh, North Carolina] 3 April 1867; p. 3.

• “Acknowledgement of Letters.” The Episcopal Methodist 29 May 1867; p. 3.

• advertisement. The Episcopal Methodist 22 May 1867; p. 4. Also, 19 June 1867; p. 4.

Branson’s North Carolina Business Directory, for 1867-1868. Raleigh, North Carolina: 1867; p. 144.

The Children’s Friend ; May 1867-after July 1870

edited by: 1867-1868, T. P. Haley • 1870, Knowles Shaw

published: Louisville, Kentucky: T. P. Haley & J. A. Dickinson, 1867-1868 • Louisville, Kentucky: Crump and Miller, 1868-1870; publisher at 80 Fourth St., 1870

frequency: semimonthly

description: Page size, about 13″ h x 9.5″ w: “about the size of the Child’s World

• Prices: 1868: 1 copy, 50¢/ year; 10+ copies, 40¢ each/ year. 1870: 1 copy, 60¢/ year; 10 copies, $4.50/ year; 25 copies, $10/ year; 50 copies, $17.50/ year; 100 copies, $30/ year

• 7 April 1868, Haley announced that “[t]he first volume … is now complete, wanting one number”—indicating that the first issue was May 1867

• Religious focus

relevant information:

• In 1870, while the Friend was published in Louisville, Kentucky, the editor lived in Rushville, Indiana.

• The subscribers included Sunday schools in Canada and in states across the U.S., among them Kentucky, Indiana, Ohio, Illinois, Missouri, Minnesota, Virginia, Pennsylvania, New York, Maryland, Tennessee, Arkansas, Texas, and California.

• Perhaps continued by The Children’s Friend (Lexington, Kentucky; 1868-after 1878)

relevant quotes:

• From the prospectus: “We mean no opposition to any other paper, but believing that more good, upon the whole, will be done with, than without our effort, we send out this Prospectus and solicit subscriptions, to be sent in immediately from all schools not already supplied. … The paper will labor: 1. To encourage the Children to study the Word of God, to commit the Scriptures to memory. 2. To encourage the children to active benevolence. 3. To teach the Gospel in simple and easy terms. 4. To aid parents in the responsible work of training their children in the fear of the Lord.” [Millennial Harbinger May 1867]

• The publisher changed with volume 2, 1868: “We have transferred the publishing to Crump and Miller, who have a new press and entire new font of type.” [Millennial Harbinger Aug 1868]

• With the new editor, the emphasis didn’t change: “Nothing will be admitted to its columns but that which breathes a pure, sound Scriptural sentiment, uncontaminated by any unhallowed or sectarian influences.” [Millennial Harbinger July 1870]

source of information: notices, etc., below

bibliography:

• notice. The Louisville Daily Courier [Louisville, Kentucky] 27 March 1867; p. 1.

• “The Children’s Friend.” The Millennial Harbinger 38 (May 1867); p. 270.

• “The Children’s Friend: To My Subscribers.” The Millennial Harbinger 39 (Aug 1868); p. 479.

• “The Children’s Friend.” The Millennial Harbinger 41 (July 1870); p. 419.

The Young Catholic’s Guide ; May 1867-after July 1870

cover/masthead: 1870

published: Chicago, Illinois: John Graham; publisher at 141 Madison St., 1870.

frequency: monthly; 1 vol/ year

description: 32 pp.; page size, 8.5″ h; price, $1/ year

relevant quote:

• “[T]he fact that the Young Catholic’s Guide is edited by a clergyman is a sufficient guarantee that its pages will be both edifying and moral.” [“New Publications”]

source of information: OCLC; NUC; AASHistPer

available: AASHistPer, series 5

The Morning Star and Catholic Messenger [New Orleans, Louisiana] reprinted “A Christian.” [20 Feb 1870; p. 7]

bibliography:

• “New Publications.” The Morning Star and Catholic Messenger [New Orleans, Louisiana] 5 April 1868; p. 5.

The Sabbath School Gem ; June 1867-after 1891

edited by:

• June 1867-1872, Thaddeus C. Blake

• 1886, Mrs. C. M. Harris

published:

• Nashville, Tenessee: Thaddeus C. Blake, for the Cumberland Presbyterian Church

frequency: monthly

description:

• Prices: 1 copy, 50¢/ year; 10-25 copies, 40¢ each; 25+ copies, 30¢ each

• Circulation: early 1867, 3,000. Jan 1868, 11,000

• First issue published before 2 June 1867

• Vol 2 began with June 1868

• Religious focus: Presbyterian

relevant information:

• Blake also published the Banner of Peace, a religious paper for adults, and the Theological Medium, a quarterly publication.

relevant quote:

• Unsurprisingly, one newspaper dipped into regionalism: “No Northern publications of its class are superior, and but few equal, to the ‘Gem.’ ” [Tennessean 27 May 1868]

• The Nashville Union got nostalgic: “It takes us back to the good days of old, and makes us feel that the breezes of childhood are again fanning our cheeks.” [19 May 1868]

source of information: notices, etc., below

available: Pieces were reprinted in The Casket: Selections from the Sabbath School Gem, ed. Thaddeus C. Blake. Nashville, Tennessee: Cumberland Presbyterian Board of Publication, 1872.

bibliography:

• “The Sabbath School Gem.” Nashville Union and American [Nashville, Tennessee] 19 May 1867; p. 3.

• “A Well Merited Success.” Nashville Union and Aerican [Nashville, Tennessee] 2 June 1867; p. 3.

• “The Sabbath School Gem.” Nashville Union and American [Nashville, Tennessee] 30 July 1867; p. 3.

• notice. Fayetteville Observer [Fayetteville, Tennessee] 8 Aug 1867; p. 3.

• notice of Sept issue. Nashville Union and American [Nashville, Tennessee] 28 Aug 1867; p. 3.

• “The Sabbath School Gem.” Nashville Union and American [Nashville, Tennessee] 27 Sept 1867; p. 3.

• notice of Oct issue. Fayetteville Observer [Fayetteville, Tennessee] 3 Oct 1867; p. 2.

• notice of Dec issue. Fayetteville Observer [Fayetteville, Tennessee] 12 Dec 1867; p. 3.

• “Newspaper Success.” Nashville Union and American [Nashville, Tennessee] 17 Jan 1868; p. 3.

• “The Sabbath School Gem.” Nashville Union and American [Nashville, Tennessee] 27 Feb 1868; p. 3.

• notice of March issue. Fayetteville Observer [Fayetteville, Tennessee] 27 Feb 1868; p. 2.

• “The Handsomest Paper in the State.” The Pulski Citizen [Pulaski, Tennessee] 28 Feb 1868; p. 3.

• notice of March issue. Lincoln County News [Fayetteville, Tennessee] 29 Feb 1868; p. 3.

• notice. Knoxville Press and Messenger [Knoxville, Tennessee] 2 April 1868; p. 3.

• notice of March issue. Fayetteville Observer [Fayetteville, Tennessee] 2 April 1868; p. 3.

• notice. Fayetteville Observer [Fayetteville, Tennessee] 30 April 1868; p. 2.

• “The Sabbath School Gem.” Nashville Union and American [Nashville, Tennessee] 19 May 1868; p. 3.

• “Sabbath School Gem.” The Tennessean [Nashville, Tennessee] 27 May 1868; p. 4.

• notice of July issue as “Sunday School Gem.” Fayetteville Observer [Fayetteville, Tennessee] 9 July 1868; p. 3.

• “Sabbath-School Gem.” The Tennessean [Nashville, Tennessee] 3 Sept 1868; p. 4.

• notice of Sept issue. The Pulaski Citizen [Pulaski, Tennessee] 4 Sept 1868; p. 3.

• “The Sabbath School Gem.” Lincoln County News [Fayetteville, Tennessee] 5 Sept 1868; p. 3.

• notice. Fayetteville Observer [Fayetteville, Tennessee] 10 Sept 1868; p. 3.

• “Sabbath School Gem.” The Tennessean [Nashville, Tennessee] 2 Oct 1868; p. 4.

• notice. Fayetteville, Observer [Fayetteville, Tennessee] 8 Oct 1868; p. 2.

• notice of Nov issue. Lincoln County News [Fayetteville, Tennessee] 7 Nov 1868; p. 3.

• “Periodicals, Etc.” Republican Banner [Nashville, Tennessee] 10 Jan 1869; p. 4.

• “Retired from Editorial Life.” Nashville Union and American [Nashville, Tennessee] 8 Sept 1872; p. 4.

• “Cumberland Presbyterian Publications.” The Tennessean [Nashville, Tennessee] 22 Feb 1874; p. 4.

• “Religious Publications.” Nashville Union and American [Nashville, Tennessee] 19 April 1874; p. 4.

• “Cumberland Presbyterian.” The Tennessean [Nashville, Tennessee] 25 May 1886; p. 5.

• “More Than a Million.” The Daily American [Nashville, Tennessee] 3 May 1891; p. 13.

The Youth’s Eclectic ; June-after Oct 1867

published: Belleville, Illinois: G. F. Kimball

frequency: monthly

description: 8 pp.; page size, 24-26″ h; price, 75¢/ year

• Described as “a large 40 column paper” [“Three Months Free”]

relevant information:

• Later in its history, sent to subscribers free for three months on trial

• The Eclectic reprinted pieces from other periodicals: “Without putting forth any claims for originality, it simply ‘aims to fill a niche in many an humble family that is not able to take the more costly and pretentious monthlies.’ ” [“Youth’s Eclectic.” Leavenworth Daily Commercial] The Sept issue contained pieces from The Little Corporal, Riverside Magazine for Young People, Oliver Optic’s Magazine, The Nursery, Children’s Friend, the New York Independent, The Children’s Hour, and The Student and Schoolmate. It also included “an Original Dialogue, Poetry, Puzzles, and twenty other Tales, Fables, Anecdotes, &c., &c.” [Highland Weekly News 22 Aug 1867]

• The masthead changed with the Oct issue.

relevant quote:

• The Eclectic was “designed for those who do not feel able to take the more expensive juvenile magazines, and yet could afford and would like something cheaper.” [Prairie Farmer]

source of information: notices, etc., below

bibliography:

• “Youth’s Eclectic.” Daily State Register [Des Moines, Iowa] 8 June 1867; p. 1.

• “The Youth’s Eclectic.” Leavenworth Daily Commercial [Leavenworth, Kansas] 9 June 1867; p. 4.

• We have received the first number. The McArthur Enquirer [McArthur, Ohio] 13 June 1867; p. 3.

• The Youth’s Eclectic. Lancaster Gazette [Lancaster, Ohio] 13 June 1867; p. 3.

• We have received a copy of The Youth’s Eclectic. The Weekly Free Press [Atchison, Kansas] 15 June 1867; p. 4.

• The Youth’s Eclectic. The Prairie Farmer 20 (13 July 1867); p. 24.

• The Youth’s Eclectic. The Rural Gentleman 2 (15 Aug 1867); p. 212.

• The Youth’s Eclectic continues to improve. The Highland Weekly News [Hillsboro, Ohio] 22 Aug 1867; p. 3.

• “Three Months Free.” The Highland Weekly News [Hillsboro, Ohio] 10 Oct 1867; p. 3. Also, The Elk County Advocate [Ridgway, Pennsylvania] 10 Oct 1867; p. 2.

Burke’s Weekly for Boys and Girls ; 6 July 1867-10 Dec 1870 • Burke’s Magazine for Boys and Girls ; Jan-Dec 1871

cover/masthead: 1868

edited by: T. A. Burke

published: Macon, Georgia: J. W. Burke, 6 July 1867-Dec 1871. Publisher listed as J. W. Burke & Co., 1871

frequency: weekly (Saturday) or monthly, 6 July 1867-10 Dec 1870; 1 vol/ year. Also available in quarterly parts

• monthly, 1871

• When Burke’s became a magazine published only monthly, it was advertised as “A New Monthly.” [The Intelligencer 16 Feb 1871]

description: 6 July 1867-10 Dec 1870: 8 pp.; quarto; page size untrimmed, 13″ h x 10″ w. Price: 1 copy, 5¢/ each; 50¢/ three months; $1/ six months; $2/ year; 10 copies, $15/ year; 20 copies, $30/ year

• Jan-Dec 1871: 48 pp.; page size, 9.5″ h

relevant information: Though Burke had published the Children’s Guide, he appears to have felt a need to purchase more illustrations before his new endeavor: “Parties who have duplicates of Engravings, or Electrotypes of Woodcuts, suitable for illustrating a Child’s Magazine, will find sale by sending proofs and prices to the undersigned. J. W. BURKE & CO., Macon, Ga.” [“To Publishers”]

• Because Burke’s was available weekly or monthly, advertisements often refer to “compilations”—the weekly issues gathered together for monthly subscribers.

• The contents for the May 1871 issue were printed in The Southern Home [Charlotte, North Carolina; 23 May 1871].

relevant quotes:

• A number of notices and advertisements had a regional aspect: “It is a handsome publication, replete with entertaining and unexceptionable reading, peculiarly adapted to the young folks of the South and West,” claimed the Louisville Daily Courier [4 Sept 1867] The Yorkville Enquirer noted that “This is an attempt, and not without some success, to rival the Northern Juvenile Magazines that have so long been our reading in that line.” [“Walhalla Correspondence”] “No boy or girl in the South should be without it,” announced the Elmore Standard. [“A Splendid Number”] Advertisements pronounced it to be “The Southern Favorite!” The Sumter Watchman declared it to be “peculiarly adapted to the wants of Southern children” and wondered “that all the boys and girls in the South are not subscribers to it.” [ 9 March 1870] The Times-Picayune described it as a “purely Southern enterprise” [5 May 1870], while the Shelby Guide felt it was “equal in every respect to the Northern magazines, and far superior to any of them in the quality of its reading matter.” [20 April 1871] The Southern Planter emphasized Southernness over everything else: “This is the only juvenile paper published at the South, and for that reason, as also because it is well and carefully done, should be patronized in the South.” [“Books Notices, &c.”]

• It was advertised as a magazine for everyone: “The children like it,” according to the Edgefield Advertiser, “mothers and fathers like it, Sunday School Teachers like it, we newspaper folks like it, and everybody likes it.” [2 Oct 1867] “it brings sunshine into the household,” reported the Louisville Daily Courier. “Marbles and dolls are laid aside to welcome it. It instructs and entertains at the same time, and even the old folks find interest in its pages.” [8 May 1868]

• A number of stories set in the South appeared in the magazine. The Times-Picayune touted a story set during the Civil War: “Among the interesting contributions promised is ‘A Yarn from Uncle Bob’s Log Book, or a True Tale of the Alabama,’ including a graphic description of the engagement between that famed cruiser and the U. S. steamer Kearsarge.” [5 May 1870] The CSS Alabama was sunk by the USS Kearsarge in 1864.

• On the magazine absorbing the Southern Boys’ and Girls’ Monthly: “We notice that the Southern Boys and Girls Monthly, heretofore published at Richmond, has been discontinued, and its subscription list transferred to the Weekly. This will ensure a concentration of the talent of the South on one periodical, and tend to make Burke’s Weekly even better than it has been.” [“Burke’s Weekly” The Orangeburg News]

absorbed: Southern Boys’ and Girls’ Monthly ; Jan 1867-July 1868

source of information: Aug 1868 issue; Lyon; notices, etc., below

available: AASHistPer, series 5

• google books (1871 bound vol)

• “Keeping His Word,” a poem by Margaret Junkin Preston (stepmother of Phebe Alexander Preston) was reprinted in The Spirit of Democracy [Woodsfield, Ohio; 15 Aug 1871; p. 1.].

bibliography:

• “To Publishers.” American Literary Gazette and Publishers’ Circular 8 (1 Nov 1866); p. 33.

• “Burke’s Weekly for Boys and Girls.” The Daily Phoenix [Columbia, South Carolina] 2 July 1867; p. 2.

• notice. The Louisville Daily Courier [Louisville, Kentucky] 4 Sept 1867; p. 2.

• J. W. D. “Walhalla Correspondence.” Yorkville Enquirer [York, South Carolina] 12 Sept 1867; p. 3.

• notice. Southern Cultivator 25 (Oct 1867); p. 329.

• “Burke’s Weekly for Boys and Girls.” Edgefield Advertiser [Edgefield, South Carolina] 20 Oct 1867; p. 2.

• “A Splendid Number.” The Elmore Standard. [Wetumpka, Alabama] 6 Dec 1867; p. 3.

• notice of Nov issue. Sugar Planter [Port Allen, Louisiana] 7 Dec 1867; p. 2.

• “The Southern Favorite!” The Orangeburg News [Orangeburg, South Carolina] 7 Dec 1867; p. 5.

• “1868!” Edgefield Advertiser [Edgefield, South Carolina] 1 Jan 1868; p. 2.

• “Our Exchanges: Burke’s Weekly for Boys and Girls.” Yorkville Enquirer [York, South Carolina] 2 Jan 1868; p. 2.

• “Periodicals and Pamphlets.” The Times-Picayune [New Orleans, Louisiana] 30 Jan 1868; p. 4.

• We again publish the prospectus. The Louisiana Democrat [Alexandria, Louisiana] 19 Feb 1868; p. 2.

• advertisement. The Louisiana Democrat [Alexandria, Louisiana] 19 Feb 1868; p. 3.

• “Burke’s Weekly for Boys and Girls.” Baton Rouge Tri-Weekly Gazette and Comet [Baton Rouge, Louisiana] 5 March 1868; p. 2.

• “Burke’s Weekly for Boys and Girls.” The Louisville Daily Courier [Louisville, Kentucky] 8 May 1868; p. 3.

• advertisement. Natchitoches Spectator [Natchitoches, Louisiana] 16 June 1868; p. 4.

• “Burke’s Weekly for Boys and Girls.” The Newberry Weekly Herald [Newberry, South Carolina] 8 July 1868; p. 3.

• “An Elegant Number.” The Daily Journal [Wilmington, North Carolina] 26 July 1868; p. 3. Also, The Vicksburg Herald [Vicksburg, Mississippi] 29 July 1868; p. 3.

• “Burke’s Weekly.” The Orangeburg News [Orangeburg, South Carolina] 5 Sept 1868; p. 3.

• “Two Months Free.” The Shelby Guide [Columbiana, Alabama] 12 Nov 1868; p. 2. Also, The publishers of Burke’s Weekly. Edgefield Advertiser [Edgefield, South Carolina] 4 Nov 1868; p. 4.

• “Burke’s Weekly.” The Times-Picayune [New Orleans, Louisiana] 29 Nov 1868; p. 3.

• “Burke’s Weekly for Boys and Girls.” The Newberry Weekly Herald [Newberry, South Carolina] 6 Jan 1869; p. 2.

• “Exchanges.” The Newberry Weekly Herald [Newberry, South Carolina] 3 Feb 1869; p. 2.

• “Big-Foot Wallace.” The Shelby Guide [Columbiana, Alabama] 10 June 1869; p. 3.

• The publishers of that capital juvenile paper. The Times-Picayune [New Orleans, Louisiana] 11 June 1869; p. 1. Also, “Big-Foot Wallace.” The Newberry Weekly Herald [Newberry, South Carolina] 16 June 1869; p. 2.

• “Burke’s Weekly for Boys and Girls.” Spirit of Jefferson [Charles Town, West Virginia] 13 July 1869; p. 2.

• “Burke’s Weekly for Boys and Girls.” Helena Weekly Clarion [Helena, Arkansas] 11 Aug 1869; p. 3.

• “Burke’s Weekly for Boys and Girls.” The Newberry Weekly Herald [Newberry, South Carolina] 1 Sept 1869; p. 2.

• notice of Sept issue. the Times-Picayune [New Orleans, Louisiana] 1 Oct 1869; p. 2.

• “Burke’s Weekly.” Wilcox News and Pacificator [Camden, Alabama] 25 Jan 1870; p. 3.

• “Burke’s Weekly.” Spirit of Jefferson [Charles Town, West Virginia] 1 Feb 1870; p. 4.

• “Exchanges: Burke’s Weekly for Boys and Girls.” The Sumter Watchman [Sumter, South Carolina] 2 Feb 1870; p. 2.

• “Burke’s Weekly for Boys and Girls.” The Sumter Watchman [Sumter, South Carolina] 9 March 1870; p. 3.

• notice of April issue. Shepherdstown Register [Shepherdstown, West Virginia] 23 April 1870; p. 1.

• Burke’s Weekly for April. The Southern Home [Charlotte, North Carolina] 5 May 1870; p. 2.

• “Burke’s Weekly for Boys and Girls.” The Times-Picayune [New Orleans, Louisiana] 5 May 1870; p. 4.

• “A New Programme.” Spirit of Jefferson [Charles Town, West Virginia] 17 May 1870; p. 3.

• “Burke’s Weekly for Boys and Girls.” Spirit of Jefferson [Charles Town, West Virginia] 7 June 1870; p. 2.

• “Burke’s Weekly.” raleigh Christian Advocate [Raleigh, North Carolina] 6 July 1870; p. 2.

• “How to Get an Elegant Piano.” The Shelby Guide [Columbiana, Alabama] 26 July 1870; p. 3.

• “Southern Literature.” The Troy Messenger [Troy, Alabama] 4 Aug 1870; p. 3.

• “Burke’s Weekly for Boys and Girls.” The Abingdon Virginian [Abingdon, Virginia] 30 Sept 1870; p. 3.

• “A New Monthly.” The Intelligencer [Anderson, South Carolina] 16 Feb 1871; p. 2.

• Southern Boys and Girls. The Shelby Guide [Columbiana, Alabama] 20 April 1871; p. 2.

• “Burke’s Magazine for Boys and Girls.” The Southern Home [Charlotte, North Carolina] 23 May 1871; p. 2.

• “Book Notices, &c.” Southern Planter and Farmer 5 (June 1871); p. 375.

• “Newspapers and Magazines: Burke’s Magazine for Boys and Girls.” The Times-Argus [Selma, Alabama] 2 June 1871; p. 2.

• “Book Notices.” Southern Planter and Farmer 5 (Aug 1871); p. 503.

• “The Southern Favorite.” Clarksville Weekly Chronicle [Clarksville, Tennessee] 5 Aug 1871; p. 3.

• “Burke’s Magazine for Boys and Girls.” Edgefield Advertiser [Edgefield, South Carolina] 7 Dec 1871; p. 2.

• Betty Longenecker Lyon. “A History of Children’s Secular Magazines Published in the United States from 1789-1899.” PhD diss. Johns Hopkins, 1942; p. 244.

• Gillian Avery. Behold the Child: American Children and Their Books, 1621-1922. Baltimore, Maryland: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1994; p. 148.

The Little Gleaner ; Aug 1867-1871?

edited by: “Olive O. Lee” (E. H. Faunt LeRoy)

published: Fredericksburg, Virginia, 1867-Feb 1870

• Baltimore, Maryland, 1870-1871; publisher at 156 West Lombard St., April 1870; publisher at 55 Lexington St., Oct 1870

frequency: monthly; 1 vol/ year

description: Page size, 9″ h; price, $1/ year

• Religious focus

relevant quotes:

• Some notices have a regional slant, emphasizing the Southernness of the paper: “Published by a Southern lady, it should receive the support of our community,” states the Spirit of Jefferson. [22 Sept 1868] Another notice is more personal: “The authoress is working for her bread and deserves encouragement.” [Galveston Daily News 14 March 1868]

• LeRoy tried various methods to increase subscriptions, especially targeting women as agents. LeRoy offered an opportunity to make money for charitable concerns: “To ladies in charge of Fairs for memorial Associations, Church purposes, or any charity, we offer 20 per cent of what may result from subscription to ‘Little Gleaner,’ received through their agency.” [Staunton Spectator 9 June 1868] She also advertised for women to serve as agents: “WANTED FOR A MONTH—SIX ACTIVE CANVASSERS, for the city of Baltimore. Ladies most successful, some having realized $5 a day.—Forty Dollars paid for one hundred subscribers. Persons qualified for the business will please call on the EDITOR OF LITTLE GLEANER, 55 LEXINGTON STREET, corner of Charles, and in her absence leave their address, with references.” [Baltimore Sun 1 Oct 1870] The touted $5 would be about $100 in 2019.

• A newspaper in 1871 gives the Gleaner’s instructions for taking a coin from a plate of water without wetting one’s fingers: “[F]ill a plate with water to the depth of a quarter of an inch; a coin is then placed in the water. A piece of paper is then lighted, put, while burning, on the surface of the water and covered with a tumbler, the water will rush up under the tumbler and leave the coin in the plate, when it may be lifted without wetting the fingers.” [Daily Press and Herald]

relevant information: After the Gleaner folded, LeRoy joined the faculty of Reidville Female College, South Carolina, teaching “Belles Lettres.”

source of information: OCLC; notices, etc., below

bibliography:

• notice. Richmond Dispatch [Richmond, Virginia] 9 Aug 1867; p. 1.

• “The Little Gleaner.” The Baltimore Sun [Baltimore, Maryland] 10 Aug 1867; p. 2.

• notice. Public Ledger [Memphis, Tennessee] 15 Aug 1867; p. 1.

• notice. Richmond Dispatch [Richmond, Virginia] 30 Sept 1867; p. 1.

• The Little Gleaner. Spirit of Jefferson [Charles Town, West Virginia] 26 Nov 1867; p. 2.

• notice. Alexandria Gazette [Alexandria, Virginia] 17 March 1868; p. 2.

• notice. The Galveston Daily News [Galveston, Texas] 24 March 1868; p. 2.

• “Periodicals.” The Native Virginian [Orange, Virginia] 22 May 1868; p. 2.

• “The Little Gleaner.” Staunton Spectator [Staunton, Virginia] 9 Jne 1868; p. 3.

• notice of June issue. Maryland Free Press [Hagerstown, Maryland] 18 June 1868; p. 1.

• notice of Sept issue. Alexandria Gazette [Alexandria, Virginia] 5 Sept 1868; p. 2.

• notice. Spirit of Jefferson [Charles Town, West Virginia] 22 Sept 1868; p. 3.

• notice. Staunton Spectator [Staunton, Virginia] 13 April 1869; p. 3.

• notice of Oct issue. Alexandria Gazette [Alexandria, Virginia] 13 Oct 1868; p. 2.

• notice. Staunton Spectator [Staunton, Virginia] 9 Nov 1869; p. 3.

• “Magazines &c.” Staunton Spectator [Staunton, Virginia] 14 Dec 1869; p. 3.

• notice of March issue. Staunton Spectator [Staunton, Virginia] 12 April 1870; p. 3.

• notice of July issue. Staunton Spectator [Staunton, Virginia] 2 Aug 1870; p. 3.

• “Wanted for a Month—Six Active Canvassers.” The Baltimore Sun [Baltimore, Maryland] 1 Oct 1870; p. 3.

• “Pleasant Experiments.” Daily Press and Herald [Knoxville, Tennessee] 29 April 1871; p. 4.

• “Local Laconics.” The Charleston Daily News [Charleston, South Carolina] 11 Feb 1873; p. 4.

• advertisement for the Reidville Female College. Union Times [Union, South Carolina] 13 June 1873; p. 3.

• Betty Longenecker Lyon. “A History of Children’s Secular Magazines Published in the United States from 1789-1899.” PhD diss. Johns Hopkins, 1942; p. 244.

The Young Christian Soldier ; The Young Christian Soldier and Children’s Guest ; The Young Christian Soldier Dec 1867-Dec 1911

edited by: 1867-1872, 1875-1876, A. T. Twing

• 1867-1871, Maria H. Bulfinch, associate editor

• 1871-1874, Susan Lavinia Emery

• 1874-1876, Julia Chester Emery

• 1876-1911, Margaret Theresa Emery

published: New York, New York: Domestic Missions, Protestant Episcopal Church; 1869-1872, publisher at 17 Bible House.

frequency: 1867-1872, monthly

• 1873-1911, weekly & monthly

description: 1869-1872: 8 pp.; size, 21″ x 30″; price, 50¢

• 1873: prices for weekly edition: 1-9 copies, 75¢/ year; 10+ copies, 50¢/ year. Price for monthly copy, 15¢/ year

• Circulation: 1868, 30,000 • 1871, 53,000

• Religious focus: Protestant Episcopal

relevant information:

• The Union List of Serials has the Soldier starting in 1858; this is apparently a typographical error.

• Developed from the children’s section of The Spirit of Missions (for adults).

relevant quotes:

• The Church Monthly was impressed and felt that the education system could use more Christian instruction: “[The Domestic Missionary and The Young Christian Soldier] owe their existence to the unwearied energy of Dr. Twing. The whole Church knows how broad his shoulders are, and yet we almost envy the ease with which he carries two newspapers, with a large half of the ‘Spirit of Missions,’ and, besides, Generals his army of ‘Young Soldiers.’ The Young Christian Soldier is, to our mind, the best child’s paper in the country. When we were children we were kept upon a moral course of Miss Edgeworth, and Peter Parley, or books of such like sort, in which all mention of a God was purely accidental, and any suggestion of a Saviour, as either needed or wanted, a Sectarian impertinence. Education was the summum bonum, and that education meant the repression of every religious motive or practice. The best boys and girls among us were those who knew the most of scienc eor mechanics, and who began and ended Geography and History with New England and the May Flower. If our young people are not the better, and the better taught, in this day, it will not be the fault of their friend Dr. Twing.” [“Notices of Books”]

• The emphasis of the Soldier was on missionary work, with A. T. Twing encouraging readers to accumulate money for missions in a “mite chest.” The Spirit of Missions reprinted a letter from one of the Soldier’s readers, who was collecting money for the missions by cleaning father’s boots: “I have read your two letters in The Young Christian Soldier. My papa is not rich, and I am only nine years old, and I can’t earn any money. But I told papa that I would blacken his boots every week for ten cents a week, and he said he would do it for one year. Now, Mr. Twing, please tell me how often I shall send you the money, and if you think I had better have a mite chest. Mr. Twing, I want the money to go to Bishop Tuttle, for when my mamma died, Bishop Tuttle was the minister who attended her funeral, and I want the money to go to his mission.” [“Notes”]

absorbed:

Children’s Guest (Jan 1860-Dec 1870)

The Carrier Dove (Sept 1853-Dec 1877)

source of information: Keely; AAS catalog; Rowell

available: AASHistPer, series 5 (1876 only)

bibliography:

• “The Young Christian Soldier.” The Brooklyn Union [Brooklyn, New York] 14 Nov 1867; p. 3.

• “The Young Christian Soldier.” Spirit of Missions Dec 1868; p. 887.

Geo. P. Rowell & Co’s American Newspaper Directory. New York: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1869; p. 78. [archive.org]

• “The Young Christian Soldier.” American Quarterly Church Review Jan 1869; p. 637.

• “Notices of Books.” Church Monthly Aug 1869; pp. 473-474.

The Men Who Advertise. New York: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1870; p. 708. [google books]

• “Notes.” Spirit of Missions May 1870; p. 283. Reprinted in “Religious Miscellany.” Wisconsin State Journal [Madison, Wisconsin] 11 June 1870; p. 2.

Proceedings of the Board of Missions of the Protestant Episcopal Church. New York, New York: American Church Press Company, 1871; appendix A, p. 3.

Geo. P. Rowell & Co.’s American Newspaper Directory. New York: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1872; p. 129. [archive.org]

• “The Young Christian Soldier.” Spirit of Missions Nov 1872; p. 682.

• “The Young Christian Soldier.” Spirit of Missions Jan 1874; p. 20.

• Julia C. Emery. A Century of Endeavor, 1821-1921. New York, New York: The Department of Missions, 1921; pp. 170, 193, 361, 363, 365, 367, 386. [archive.org]

• Karen A. Keely. “ ‘Let the children have their part’: ‘The Young Christian Soldier” and the Domestic Missionary Army.” Anglican and Episcopal History 79 (Sept 2010); pp. 200-237.

Children of the West ; 1868-1869

edited by: W. F. Wells

published: Mount Lebanon, Louisiana: W. F. Wells

frequency: monthly

description: 4 pp.; page size 23″ h x 16″ w; price, 50¢/ year

• Religious focus: Baptist

source of information: Rowell; Paxton; notices, etc., below

bibliography:

• “Worthy Enterprise.” The Ouachita Telegraph [Monroe, Louisiana] 17 Oct 1867; p. 3.

• “New Sunday School Paper—The Children of the West.” Hall’s Journal of Health 15 (Jan 1868); p. 23. Also, advertisement. The Texas Vindicator [Paris, Texas] 2 Feb 1868; p. 4. Also, advertisement. Dallas Herald [Dallas, Texas] 18 Jan 1868; p. 3.

• notice. The New Orleans Crescent [New Orleans, Louisiana] 12 March 1868; p. 4.

• “Children of the West.” The Selma Times and Messenger [Selma, Alabama] 20 March 1868; p. 3.

• notice. The Home Advocate 1 (13 Feb 1869); p. 4; online at UNT Digital Library

• advertisement. The Home Advocate 1 (20 Feb 1869); p. 2; online at UNT Digital Library

Geo. P. Rowell & Co’s American Newspaper Directory. New York: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1869; p. 39. [archive.org]

The Men Who Advertise. New York: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1870; p. 658. [google books]

• W. E. Paxton. A History of the Baptists of Louisiana. St. Louis, Missouri: C. R. Barns Publishing Co., 1888; p. 489. [archive.org]

The Sunday School Messenger ; 1868-after June 1875

published: Chicago, Illinois: Holy Family Sunday School Association (also, the Sunday School Association of the Holy Family).

frequency: monthly; 1 vol/ year

description: 1871: page size, 7.5″ h

• June 1875 is vol 8 #6

• Religious focus: Catholic

relevant quote: By 1871, the Messenger had widened its audience: “Although it was at first intended merely to supply the wants of our own parochial Sunday Schools, it has since widely extended the sphere of its usefulness and popularity. … We have endeavored, in the Messenger, to combine the useful with the agreeable. The Usefulness of the Messenger is not confined merely to the children; it reaches the whole domestic circle, and, in very many instances, it is a welcome friend and visitore to the self-sacrificing mother, who, on account of family duties is prevented from hearing either the sermon or catechetical instruction on Sundays.” [“Introduction.” 4 (Jan 1871); p. 1-2]

source of information: AAS catalog; AASHistPer, series 5; ULS; OCLC

available: AASHistPer, series 5

bibliography:

• “The Churches: Something About the Religious Press of Chicago.” Chicago Tribune [Chicago, Illinois] 16 March 1873; p. 12.

• “Another Chapter On the Religious Press of Chicago.” Chicago Tribune [Chicago, Illinois] 23 March 1873; p. 5.

Young People’s Magazine ; 1868-1887

edited by: P. W. Ziegler

published: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

frequency: monthly

description: 1886: 32 pp.; page size, 10″ h x 7 ″ w; price, $1.50/ year; circulation, 5,000

source of information: sources listed below

bibliography:

• J. Thomas Scharf and Thompson Westcott. History of Philadelphia, 1609-1884. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania: L. H. Everts & Co., 1884; vol 3, p. 2040.

N. W. Ayer & Son’s American Newspaper Annual. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania: N. W. Ayer & Son, 1886; p. 99.

• Betty Longenecker Lyon. “A History of Children’s Secular Magazines Published in the United States from 1789-1899.” PhD diss. Johns Hopkins, 1942; p. 245.

The Children’s Friend ; 1868-after 1878

edited by: M. K. Ware, 1874

published: Lexington, Kentucky: Transylvania Printing and Publishing Co., 1874-1878; publisher at 49 & 51 E. Main, 1876

frequency: semimonthly: 1st & 3rd Sunday each month

description: 1874: 4 pp.; 21″ h x 14″ w; price: 50¢/ year

• 1876: 4 pp.; price, $1.25/ year for the Friend and Good Words

• Religious focus

relevant information:

• Alternates with Good Words for the Children, with the same editor and publisher

• Perhaps continues The Children’s Friend (Louisville, Kentucky; May 1867-after July 1870)

source of information: AASHistPer; pieces listed below

available: AASHistPer, series 5 (1876 only)

• Perhaps supplied “I Like to See Everything Happy,” reprinted in The Kentucky Advocate [Danville, Kentucky; 9 June 1876; p. 1]

bibliography:

Geo. P. Rowell & Co’s American Newspaper Directory. New York, New York: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1874; p. 72.

Kentucky State Gazetteer and Business Directory, for 1876-7. Louisville, Kentucky: R. L. Polk & Co., 1876; p. 236.

• A. Hogeland, comp. Centennial Report of the Mineral and Agricultural Resources of the State of Kentucky. N.p.: Courier-Journal Job Rooms, 1877; p. 35.

Pettengill’s Newspaper Directory and Advertisers’ Hand-Book for 1878. New York, New York: S. M. Pettengill & Co., 1878; p. 211.

Youth’s Manual ; Jan-26 June, Aug-Dec 1868, Jan 1869 • The Weekly Manual ; 6 Feb 1869 • The Youth’s Manual ; 25 Feb, July-Oct, Dec 1869 • The Temperance Star ; 6-20 Jan 1870 • The Youth’s Guide ; 7 April-12 May 1870

cover/masthead: Jan 1868-Jan 1869 | 6 Feb 1869 | 25 Feb-Dec 1869 | Jan 1870 | April-May 1870

published: Horicon, New York: James F. Hart

frequency: Jan-May, monthly; • June 1868, semimonthly • Aug-Dec 1868, monthly • 6 Feb 1869, weekly • Jan, April-May 1870, semimonthly

description: 4 pp.; page size, 11.5-15.25″ h

• Prices: 1868, 15¢/ year. • 1869: weekly, 60¢/ year; semimonthly, 30¢/ year; monthly, 25¢/ year. • 1870: semimonthly (Jan), 50¢/ year; monthly, 25¢/ year; semimonthly (April-May), 30¢/ year

• Circulation: peak, 600. May 1870, 200

• Temperance focus, Jan 1870

• Religious focus, April-May 1870

relevant information:

• The issue for 6 Feb 1869 is also marked as 1 March 1869 on an interior page.

• The editor’s struggles with grammar and professionalism may indicate that this was an amateur periodical; however, it carried at least one solid page of advertising in most issues, which most amateur papers appear not to have done.

relevant quotes:

• No one seems to have tried harder than James Hart to keep a periodical going. He tried it monthly. He tried it weekly. He tried it semimonthly. He changed the name. He pointed out how impossible it was to carry on without an income. He changed the focus. Nothing worked. Hart’s struggles encapsulate just how difficult it was for an independent publisher to maintain a children’s periodical.

• On the switch to a weekly and on economic difficulties (grammar was not one of Hart’s strengths): “Our readers will observe that we have changed the name of our paper and call it The Weekly Manual, but it is the same class paper that it was before, calculated for the benefit of Children and Youth; we have placed the subscription price within reach of all, even the poorest class of people, it being only sixty Cents a Year. Only sixty cents for fifty-two numbers of the Manual, who has got so small a soul that they will not give sixty cents for our paper a year, when we are so poor and ne[e]dy; we have tried every way we could to induce people to subscribe for our paper, but have very poor success; we have only received $3.00 for subscriptions since the first of January; we are in debt for rent and firewood; we can scarcely get food enough to eat; we are discouraged, and who would not be, if placed in the same place that we are, and under the same circumstances? we think no one. We would be happy to keep our paper up, but how can we do it without means; we know that our paper is poorly printed and the reason why is because we have not got a press suitable to print a paper on, nor have we got the means to buy a new one with. It would take but a few hundred subscribers to place us in circumstances to print our paper in good stile, now if you have any charity for a poor downcast, and almost God forsaken Editor, pray lend us a helping hand, tell your neighbors how needy we are, and try to induce them to subscribe for our paper, tell them it is a paper worthy of their patronage, show them a copy, let them read it, and we have no doubt they will be inclined to subscribe for it. Some may think that our pleading up poverty is all a humbug to get subscribers, but if you do not believe we are poor, just come and see for yourselves.” [“The Manual.” The Weekly Manual 2 (6 Feb 1869); p. 11.]

• Weekly didn’t work, and Hart suspended publication, hoping to publish semimonthly if he could afford it; he may have chosen to suspend after the 26 Feb 1869 issue because 300 subscribers were then due to renew: “The cause of the suspension of the Manual until the first of April is from the fact that we have got out of stock, and out of means to buy more with, and we have got to wait awhile in order to recruit up before we can go on with our paper, this seems rather bad that a paper as interesting as the Manual has been should have to be su[s]pended for a time, in or[d]er to procure means to buy stock with, it shows that there is a lacking in the duty of our friends, for it is the duty of every person who knows our situation, to assist in susta[i]ning our paper, and we hope that hereafter, our friends will be more diligent in trying to procuring subscriber [sic] for our paper. … Unless we can obtain a larger circulation we shall be compelled to change our paper back to a monthly paper again, but this we do not want to do if we can possibly avoid it ….” [notice of suspension. The Youth’s Manual 2 (26 Feb 1869); p. 15.]

• Hart’s plans went awry, and the month-long suspension extended itself to three months, with the proposed semimonthly paper changing back to a monthly: “We wanted to have sent it out at the time specified in our last number, but at that time, we had no place to print it. But soon after, we succeeded in purchasing a little place to live, but as it took a long time to get our affairs arranged, therefore we have not been able to get it out until now …. We shall not try to print the Manual but once a month, but we hope that it will be a welcome visitor in every family, and be read with pleasure, and its contents may do much good.” [“Our Explanation and Apology.” The Youth’s Manual 2 (July 1869); p. 18.]

• Hart also ungrammatically encouraged subscribers to write for the Manual : “We should be very happy to have our young readers write for our paper, no matter if you can’t write very well, we can read it, write something about your Sabbath School, your Temperance Society, &c., it will be interesting to read pieces written by our little friends.” [The Youth’s Manual 2 (July 1869); p. 18.]

• Results were encouraging, and Hart decided to try again for a semimonthly paper in 1870: “Our paper is still gaining a circulation far beyond our expectation, and we think that we shall be able to commence our new volume with a much larger circulation than we even anticipated. We think of publishing our paper semi-monthly next year, if we can arrange our other business so that we can get time to publish it so often—we shall give notice in our next number, if we conclude to do so.” [“Our Paper.” The Youth’s Manual 2 (Oct 1869); p. 31.]

• The “next number,” however, announced a new paper: “We hereby give notice that this is the last number of the Manual that will be published, but we are not going to stop printing a paper, oh, no! but we thought it best to change the name, and call it ‘The Temperance Star.’ … [W]e shall commence the publication of the Star the first of January, and publish it once in two weeks …. We are a little ashamed of the manner in which we have conducted the Manual for the past year, and shall try to do better in the future.” [“Our Paper.” The Youth’s Manual 2 (Dec 1869); p. 29.]

• On the change to a temperance paper: “It is with mixed feelings of pride and diffidence that we commence the publication of our new edition, and commit it to the tender mercy of the public; diffident, in the consciousness of many imperfections in style, matter, and execution. But time and perseverance, will enable us, doubtless, to correct many fa[u]lts; and by the aid of new printing materials, which we shall procure as soon as convenient, will enable us to give a clear and more delicate surface impression to its pages. We have long felt a deep interest in the Temperance Cause, and have often wished that we had the power to banish the Demon intemperance from the land.” [“Our Paper.” The Temperance Star 3 (6 Jan 1870); p. 3.]

• But with the next issue it was back to monthly: “It is with feelings of regret that we are compelled to announce to our readers that we must change our paper back to a monthly again. This is the third time we have started a semi-monthly edition, and have been obliged to change it back to a monthly again. The fact is as soon as we start a semi-monthly edition, the people stop subscribing, the cause we are not able to explain, but if they do not want it but once a month, of course we shall have to comply with their wishes.” [“Our Paper.” The Temperance Star 3 (20 Jan 1870); p. 7.]

• Temperance, however, appears not to have paid: “We hardly know what to say in regard to our paper. We have made many changes since we commenced the publication, with the hope of gaining a larger circulation, but have failed to accomplish the work; we commenced the publication of the Temperance Star, with the anti[c]ipation of receiving aid from Temperance societies, but it decreased them ten percent. Of course this will not do, and consequently we have deemed it necessary to make another change, or throw up our paper entirely. We have therefore com[m]enced a little Semi-Monthly Journal, for Sunday-Schools, and the fire-side, and we hope to have success with this change, it will contain no advertisements, and will be devoted to the interest and benefit of the young.” [Editorial. The Youth’s Guide 1 (7 April 1870); p. 3.] Hart did include an advertisement in the next issue, apologetically.

• Things were looking up: “We are glad to say that our little paper is gaining grounds, [sic] it seems to suit people better than ever before, and we think the late impro[v]ement will prove successful.” [Editorial notice. The Youth’s Guide 3 (21 April 1870); p. 7.]

• But looks were deceiving, and the editor got blunt: “It is with feelings of deep regret that we announce to our readers that this is the last number of the Guide. We can publish it no longer. We have lost over three hundred dollars in trying to sustain our paper, and we can lose no more. We have never had a circulation large enough to make it pay, and to-day, our circulation is only about one third as large as it was a year ago, and instead of increasing it decreases with every number. Now how can we publish a paper with such a result? Our circulation has been nearly six hundred, but to-day it does not exceed two hundred, and this number will reduce it nearly fifty more. [Note: i.e, subscribers were due to renew subscriptions] It costs us twenty-five dollars a month to publish it. We have received but fifteen subs[c]riptions since the first of April, and five of them have not paid yet. Is not this encourageing? [sic] Now does not this look as though our readers took a deep interest in the enterprize? does it not look as though they had tried hard to sustain our little paper? ‘Well,’ says one, ‘if you had not failed up so many times, I should have subscribed for your paper, and tried to get others to subscribe for it, but I could not depend upon it, and so I did not try to do anything.’ Well, how could we help but fail, if every one has done as you have? and we have no doubt the most of them have been doing just the same as you have. But we have failed for the last time. All subscribers will receive their just dues back, just as soon as we can procure the means.” [“Our Last Issue.” The Youth’s Guide 3 (12 May 1870); p. 11.]

source of information: AASHistPer, series 5

available: AASHistPer, series 5

The Boys’ and Girls’ Literary Journal (also, The Boys and Girls Literary Journal) ; June-after Aug 1868

edited by: Letitia Christian Tyler

published: Montgomery, Alabama: William W. Beasley

frequency: weekly

description: prices, 50¢/ three months; $1/ six months; $2/ year. Unusually, payments for subscriptions were made quarterly.

relevant information:

• The Union List of Serials lists issues for 4 June 1868, 25 June 1868, and 22 Aug 1868. Ellison lists an issue for July 4.

• In Oct 1868, Tyler may be mentioned in an advertisement for a boarding and day school run by her mother: “From the very limited number of Scholars it is in her power to accept, Mrs. Tyler and her daughter would be enabled to pay devoted attention to each child under their care and would endeavor in every way to deserve the trust placed in them. [Montgomery Advertiser 6 Oct 1868]

interesting information:

• As was repeated in many notices of the Journal, Tyler was the granddaughter of President John Tyler and born in the White House, her mother then serving as hostess for the President after his wife died. Not mentioned was that Letitia also raised the first flag of the Confederacy, in Montgomery, Alabama, on 4 March 1861, at the invitation of Jefferson Davis.

• Tyler’s father, Robert, became part of the editorial department of the Montgomery Advertiser in April 1868. Earlier, a bit of news appearing in a Southern newspaper was abridged and reprinted in a number of newspapers: “Miss Letitia Christian Tyler, born in the presidential mansion at Washington, the beautiful and accomplished granddaughter of the late President John Tyler, and the eldest daughter of Robert Tyler, so distinguished for his zeal and eloquence as the champion of Irish nationality and independence, and a trusted leader of the old Democratic party before the war, is now engaged in type-setting, in the employment of the Advertiser, Montgomery, Ala. This brave girl shows that her blood descends from a resolute and fearless stock.” [Public Ledger 14 Jan 1868]

relevant quote: The Lancaster Daily Evening Express was pleased at the publication of a new children’s periodical: “It is a gratifying fact that magazines and newspapers for boys and girls are multiplying in every direction. Some of these juvenile publications are models of their kind, and are having a wide-spread circulation, and are exercising a most healthful influence upon the rising generation.”

source of information: notices, etc., below

available: The Weekly Advertiser [Montgomery, Alabama] reprinted “A Pure Heart.” [30 June 1868; p. 2]

• The Mobile Daily Register [Mobile, Alabama] reprinted an editorial by Tyler. [30 June 1868; p. 2]

bibliography:

• Miss Letitia Christian Tyler. Public Ledger [Memphis, Tennessee] 14 Jan 1868; p. 4.

• “Montgomery Advertiser.” Alabama Beacon [Greensboro, Alabama] 11 April 1868; p. 2.

• “Alabama.” The Times-Picayune [New Orleans, Louisiana] 22 May 1868; p. 1.

• We have received the prospectus. Independent Monitor [Tuscaloosa, Alabama] 26 May 1868; p. 3.

• “News and Other Items.” The Daily Evening Express [Lancaster, Pennsylvania] 5 June 1868; p. 2.

• “The Boys and Girls Literary Journal.” The Montgomery Advertiser [Montgomery, Alabama] 21 June 1868; p. 3.

• We have the first number. The Selma Times and Messenger [Selma, Alabama] 26 June 1868; p. 2.

• “For the Boys and Girls.” Mobile Daily Register [Mobile, Alabama] 30 June 1868; p. 2.

• advertisement for Tylers’ boarding and day school. The Montgomery Advertiser [Montgomery, Alabama] 6 Oct 1868; p. 2.

• Marie Bankhead Owen. “Raising the First Confederate Flag.” Confederate Veteran 24 (May 1916); p. 199. Also, “Flag of the Confederate States.” reprinted from The Montgomery Weekly Advertiser 6 March 1861; pp. 199-200. [google books]

• Rhoda Coleman Ellison. A Check List of Alabama Imprints, 1807-1870. Tuscaloosa, Alabama: University of Alabama Press, 1946; p. 26. [hathitrust.org]

• W. Stanley Hoole, comp. Alabama Newspapers in the University of Alabama Library. Typescript. Tuscaloosa, Alabama: University of Alabama, 1951; p. 9. [hathitrust.org]

• Philadelphia Bibliographic Center and Union Literary Catalogue. Union List of Microfilms, Cumulation 1949-1959. Ann Arbor, Michigan: J. W. Edwards, 1961; column 351. [hathitrust.org]

Boys’ Journal ; July 1868-after 1871?

edited by: A. B. Mereness, 1870 • Mereness Brothers, 1871

published: Martinsburg, New York: A. B. Mereness, 1868, 1870. • Martinsburg, New York: Mereness Brothers, 1871.

frequency: monthly

description: 1868: price, 20¢/ year

• 1870: 8 pp.; page size, 18″ h x 12″ w; price, 25¢/ year

• 1871: 12 pp.; octavo; 25¢/ year

• Circulation: 1870, 900. 1871, 1,700

source of information: notice; Rowell; Hough

bibliography:

• notice. Now & Then 1 (Oct 1868); p. 3.

The Men Who Advertise. New York: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1870; p. 697. [google books]

• Geo. P. Rowell & Co.’s American Newspaper Directory. New York: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1871; p. 100. [loc.gov]

• Franklin B. Hough. History of Lewis County, New York. Syracuse, New York: D. Mason & Co.; p. 113-114. [archive.org]

Little Messenger ; July 1868-1 Aug 1873

cover/masthead: 1869

edited by: Aug 1872-Aug 1873, W. H. Hinkley

published: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania: General Convention of the New Jerusalem in the United States of America; 1869, publisher at 537 North 22nd St.

frequency: 1 vol/ year • OCLC: monthly; NUC: semimonthly; Nov 1869-1871, semimonthly

description: 1869: 4 pp; page size, 12.75″ h x 9.25″ w • 1871: price, 50¢/ year

• Religious focus: General Church of the New Jerusalem

source of information: 15 Nov 1869 issue; OCLC; NUC; pieces listed below

bibliography:

• “Historical Sketch of the New Jerusalem Church in Lancaster.” Intelligencer Journal [Lancaster, Pennsylvania] 1 Feb 1870; p. 2.

• “New Church Periodicals.” Urbana Union [Urbana, Ohio] 25 Jan 1871; p. 2.

Boys’ and Girls’ New Monthly Magazine ; July 1868-

published: Nyack, New York: W. B. Corning, jr.

description: octavo; price, 75¢/ year • Aug 1868 is vol 1 #2

relevant information: In 1870, Corning was publishing the Home Cabinet, a family paper.

source of information: Lyon; NUC; notice

bibliography:

• notice. The Monmouth Inquirer [Freehold, New Jersey] 2 July 1868; p. 2.

• Betty Longenecker Lyon. “A History of Children’s Secular Magazines Published in the United States from 1789-1899.” PhD diss. Johns Hopkins, 1942; p. 245.

The Guiding Star: A Sunday Paper for Boys and Girls ; 4 July 1868-1873

edited by: Caroline A. Soule

published: New York, New York: Caroline A. Soule; 1870-1872, publisher at 119 Nassau St.

• Cincinnati, Ohio: Williamson and Cantwell Publishing Company, 1871-1872

frequency: semimonthly

description: Page size, 16.5″ h x 24″ w

• Prices: 1 copy, 75¢/ year; 10 copies or more, 50¢/ year, each

• Circulation: July 1868, 500; 1871, 10,000+; 1872, 11,600

• Religious focus: Universalist

source of information: Student and Schoolmate; OCLC; Rowell; Eddy

available: AASHistPer, series 5

bibliography:

• “Universalist.” The Brooklyn Daily Eagle [Brooklyn, New York] 6 June 1868; p. 2.

• advertisement. The Student and Schoolmate. 23 (April 1869): inside front cover (cover page 2).

The Men Who Advertise. New York: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1870; p. 704. [google books]

• notice. The Abilene Weekly Chronicle [Abilene, Kansas] 9 Feb 1871; p. 3.

Geo. P. Rowell & Co.’s American Newspaper Directory. New York: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1872; p. 124. [archive.org]

• Mrs. Caroline A. Soule. Democrat and Chronicle [Rochester, New York] 25 July 1871; p. 2.

• “The Guiding Star.” The Abilene Weekly Chronicle [Abilene, Kansas] 2 May 1872; p. 3.

• Richard Eddy. Universalism in America. Boston, Massachusetts: Universalist Publishing House, 1886; vol 2, p. 598. [google books]

Young Folks’ Friend ; Sept 1868-1869

edited by: 1868-1869, N. Draheir

published: Sparta, Georgie: N. Draheir

frequency: monthly

description: 4 pp.; page size, 24″ h x 18″ w; price, 50¢/ year

• Vol 1 #2 is Oct 1868

relevant information: R. A. Harrison, who acted as agent for the Friend, published the Illustrated Family Friend, which is not listed in Rowell as a periodical for children.

continued by: Illustrated Family Friend and Student’s Assistant (1870) ; Illustrated Family Friend (1871) ; Illustrated Record and Repository (1872)

source of information: Rowell’s; OCLC

available: “Five Cents’ Worth” was reprinted in The Baptist [Memphis, Tennessee] 23 May 1874; p. 6.

bibliography:

• “Personal.” The Atlanta Constitution [Atlanta, Georgia] 27 Sept 1868; p. 2.

Geo. P. Rowell & Co’s American Newspaper Directory. NY: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1869; p. 18. [archive.org]

The Men Who Advertise. New York, New York: Nelson Chesman, for Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1870; p. 630.

Geo. P. Rowell & Co’s American Newspaper Directory. New York: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1871; p. 25.

Geo. P. Rowell & Co.’s American Newspaper Directory. NY: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1872; p. 27. [archive.org]

Good Words for the Young ; Nov 1868-Oct 1872

cover/masthead: Nov 1868-April 1870 | May-Oct 1870 | Nov-Dec 1870 | -June 1872

edited by: Norman Macleod, 1868-1869

• George MacDonald, 1869-1872

published: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania: J. P. Lippincott & Co., 1869-1872; 1870, publisher at 515 & 517 Market St.

• Material originated in London, England: “This is a reprint in fac-simile of the English edition of this deservedly popular juvenile magazine.” [From J. B. Lippincott & Co.]

frequency: monthly

description: 1872, 56 pp.; page size, 10″ h x 7″ w; price, $2.50

continued by: Good Things for the Young of All Ages

source of information: AAS catalog; OCLC; American Literary Gazette ; Rowell

available: AASHistPer, series 5

bibliography:

• “Notes on Books and Booksellers.” American Literary Gazette and Publishers’ Circular 13 (15 Oct 1869); pp. 378-379.

• “Editor’s Table.” Maine Farmer 37 (30 Oct 1869); p. 2.

• notice. The Times-Picayune [New Orleans, Louisiana] 4 Nov 1869; p. 1.

• From J. B. Lippincott & Co. The Evening Telegraph [Philadelphia, Pennsylvania] 5 Nov 1869; p. 3.

The Men Who Advertise. New York: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1870; p. 736. [google books]

• “The Magazines, Etc.: Good Words for the Young.” The Advance 5 (8 Feb 1872); p. 6.)

• notice. Christian World 23 (June 1872); p. 199.

The Minnesota Pupil ; Dec 1868-1869 • The Minnesota Pupil and Youth’s National Gazette ; 1870-after 1872

cover/masthead: 1869

edited by: Charles R. Hatch & Herbert H. Hatch

published: Minneapolis, Minnesota: Hatch Brothers

frequency: 1868-1869, semimonthly; 1870-1871, weekly (Saturday); 1872, monthly

description: 4 pp. Page sizes: 1868-1871, 23″ h x 17″ w; 1872, 22″ h x 15″ w. Prices: 1868-1871, 1 copy, $1/ year; 1872, 25¢/ year

• Circulation: 1869, 5,000 (from paper). 1870, 5,400. 1871, 11,700. 1872, 2,500

relevant information: The Pupil was printed by the presses of the Minneapolis Tribune.

relevant quote: The publishers weren’t shy about talking up their publication: they informed potential advertisers that it was the “best medium for advertising in the State; a paper of high moral tone; clubs free with all standard papers and magazines no objectionable advertisements taken.” [Men ; p. 676]

source of information: AASHistPer; notices, etc., below

available: AASHistPer, series 5

bibliography:

• “The Tribune Office.” Minneapolis Tribune [Minneapolis, Minnesota] 10 April 1869; p. 4.

• “The Minnesota Pupil.” Minneapolis Tribune [Minneapolis, Minnesota] 1 May 1869; p. 4.

The Men Who Advertise. New York: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1870; pp. 676, 826. [google books]

• “The Workshop of the Northwest: Fourth Annual Report of Manufacturing Industry at the Falls of St. Anthony.” The Minneapolist Tribune 17 April 1870; p. 2.

• “The Editorial Association.” Minneapolis Tribune [Minneapolis, Minnesota] 6 June 1870; p. 4.

Geo. P. Rowell & Co.’s American Newspaper Directory for 1872. New York: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1871; pp. 87, 288. [archive.org]

Geo. P. Rowell & Co.’s American Newspaper Directory for 1873. New York: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1872; p. 116. [google books]

The Young Folks’ News ; 16 Dec 1868-after 1882

cover/masthead: 1872

edited by: 1870 & 1872, Henry Reeves • 1880, Helen J. Hicks

published: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania: Alfred Martien. 19 Sept 1868, office at 54 N. 6th St.; 24 Dec 1868, office at 21 S. 7th St. early 1869, office at 21 S. 7th St.; 2 Dec 1869, office at 1214 Chestnut St. 1870 & 1872, office at 1214 Chestnut St.; 1880, office at 621 Jayne St.

• Henry Reeves also appears as publisher in 1869.

frequency: weekly: Wednesday

description: 4 pp.; described in Rowell for 1869 as 8 pp.

• 1868, price, 50¢/ year

• 1869, price $1/ year

• 1870: page size, 26″ h x 18″ w

• 1872: page size, 26″ h x 17″ w; price, $1/ year

• 1880: page size, 24″ h x 17″ w; price, $1.25/ year

• Circulation: 1870 & 1872, 9,000 • 1880, over 5,000

relevant information:

• Mentioned in Rowell, 1882

• Martien had been a book publisher; he resumed book publishing in 1869 after purchasing the stock and copyrights of James S. Claxton. [“Notice.”]

relevant quotes:

• In early ads, Martien promised something for everyone: “It will be a sheet of four pages, handsomely illustrated, secular in character, and will be adapted for Young People of all grades. Special pains will be taken to render it attractive and popular; and practised writers will see that our Young Friends are not disappointed in their weekly feast of good things. Stories written with point, and conveying some moral lessons, Sketches of the Animal Kingdom, Wonders of Many Lands, Incidents of Travel, Facts of Science, Anecdotes, Charades, Puzzles, Poetry, Wit, and Original and Humorous Articles for Declamation, are among the things of interest that will be provided.” [Advertisement. New York Evangelist 39 (24 Dec 1868); p. 5.]

• The advantage of a weekly periodical, Martien pointed out, was that “[i]t is better to have one’s heart gladdened fifty-two times a year than only twelve.”[advertisement. New York Evangelist 39 (24 Dec 1868)]

• “The first number of this new Weekly for the Young Folks was issued in December last. … [I]ts circulation now ranks with that of our most popular Juvenile Periodicals.” [advertisement. Our Schoolday Visitor 13 (Aug 1869): advertising section]

source of information: NUC; OCLC; Rowell; notices & advertisements (below)

available: AASHistPer, series 5

bibliography:

• advertisement. Medical and Surgical Reporter 19 (19 Sept 1868); p. 240.

• “New Publications.” The Philadelphia Inquirer [Philadelphia, Pennsylvania] 18 Dec 1868; p. 8.

• advertisement. New York Evangelist 39 (24 Dec 1868); p. 5.

Geo. P. Rowell & Co’s American Newspaper Directory. New York: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1869; p. 99. [archive.org]

• “Reviews and Book Notices.” Medical and Surgical Reporter 20 (2 Jan 1869); p. 12.

• advertisement. New York Evangelist 40 (7 Jan 1869); p. 5.

• “Periodicals, &c.” The Belvidere Standard [Belvidere, Illinois] 25 May 1869; p. 3.

• “Notice.” American Literary Gazette and Publishers’ Circular 13 (15 July 1869); p. 160.

• advertisement. Our Schoolday Visitor 13 (Aug 1869): advertising section.

• advertisement. New York Evangelist 40 (16 Dec 1869); p. 5.

• notice. The Christian World 21 (Oct 1870); p. 327.

The Men Who Advertise. New York: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1870; p. 735. [google books]

• advertisement. Daily Press and Herald [Knoxville, Tennessee] 23 Dec 1870; p. 2.

• notice. Christian World 22 (June 1871); p. 207.

• notice. American Literary Gazette and Publishers’ Circular 17 (2 Oct 1871); p. 318.

Geo. P. Rowell & Co.’s American Newspaper Directory. New York: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1872; p. 160. [archive.org]

• notice. Christian World 23 (June 1872); p. 199.

• advertisement. New York Evangelist 44 (11 Dec 1873); p. 5.

• advertisement. The Independent 26 (20 Aug 1874); p. 12.

• advertisement. The Brandon Union [Brandon, Vermont] 28 Nov 1874; p. 4.

• advertisement. Arthur’s Illustrated Home Magazine 42 (Dec 1874); p. 546.

• advertisement. Arthur’s Illustrated Home Magazine 44 (Dec 1876); p. 696.

Geo. P. Rowell & Co’s American Newspaper Directory. New York: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1880; p. 333. [google books]

• Obituary of Henry Reeves. New York Observer and Chronicle 79 (21 March 1901); p. 371.

The Little Folks ; 1869-1877

edited by: Edward Eggleston

published: Chicago, Illinois: Adams, Blackmer & Lyon Publishing Co.

frequency: monthly, for weekly distribution on Sunday: “It is issued monthly, and has a leaf for each Sunday.” [notice. Daily Press and Herald]

description: 8 pp.; page size, 9.25″ h. Price: 30¢/ year

• Circulation, 1872, 22,000

relevant quotes:

• Description: “It is an Illustrated Paper, for every Sunday, for Infant Scholars. Each weekly number contains a cut, and two original stories by the editor.” [advertisement. The Independent]

• It was advertised as “just the thing for infant classes!!” [advertisement. The Independent] A notice in 1872 states that it is for children age four to seven. [Daily Press and Herald]

source of information: Independent ; Lyon; AAS catalog; OCLC; Rowell

available: AASHistPer, series 5 (1876 only)

bibliography:

• advertisement. The Independent 21 (9 Dec 1869); p. 6.

• advertisement. New Era [Washington, District of Columbia] 20 Jan 1870; p. 3.

• advertisement. The Advocate [Buffalo, New York] 28 Dec 1871; p. 3.

• notice. Christian World 23 (June 1872); p. 199.

• notice of Nov issue. Daily Press and Herald [Knoxville, Tennessee] 6 Nov 1872; p. 4.

• advertisement. New York Evangelist 43 (19 Dec 1872); p. 5.

Geo. P. Rowell & Co.’s American Newspaper Directory. New York: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1872; p. 32. [archive.org]

• Herbert E. Fleming. Magazines of a Market-Metropolis. PhD diss. University of Chicago, 1906; p. 406. [google books]

• Betty Longenecker Lyon. “A History of Children’s Secular Magazines Published in the United States from 1789-1899.” PhD diss. Johns Hopkins, 1942; pp. 255-256.

The Youth’s Cabinet ; 1869-1871

edited by: S. L. Cuthbert

published: Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania: S. L. Cuthbert; publisher at 39 Sixth Ave., 1869.

frequency: 1869-1870, monthly; in 1870, Cuthbert at least proposed to issue the Cabinet semimonthly. 1871, weekly

description: 1869: 4 pp.?; price, 60¢/ year. 1870: 8 pp.; size 24″ h x 19″ w; price, 60¢/ year; Cuthbert proposed to raise the price to $1/ year

• 1871: price, $1/ year

• Circulation: 1870, 1,500

relevant quote: The prospectus describes a fairly generic paper: “Mr. S. L. Cuthbert, at No. 39 Sixth avenue, proposes to publish a four-page monthly paper … to be devoted to the interests of Young People. The endeavor will be to make such a paper as will become useful and attractive to the Christian Family, and no efforts will be spared to make it good and interesting. It will contains stories (most of which will be original), Sketches, Poetry, Interesting News Items, Anecdotes, Enigmas, &c., such as will afford instruction and amusement. A portion of each number will be set apart as a ‘letter box’ for correspondents, so that any boy or girl who writes a suitable letter, may have the pleasure of seeing it in print; and for the benefit of young children, a short story, in easy words, will be printed in larger letters than the remainder of the paper.” [Pittsburgh Daily Post 28 June 1869]

• Advertisements didn’t make it sound any less generic—and failed to include the name of the periodical: “Boys and Girls. The Youth’s Magazine, published by S. L. Cuthbert, Pittsburg, is only $1.00 a year. Full of choice reading. Send for copy.” [St. Albans Transcript]

source of information: notices, etc., below

bibliography:

• “The Youth’s Cabinet.” Pittsburgh Daily Post [Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania] 28 June 1869; p. 1.

• “A Youth’s Paper.” Pittsburgh Weekly Gazette [Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania] 30 June 1869; p. 8.

• “The Youth’s Cabinet.” Pittsburgh Weekly Gazette [Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania] 4 Aug 1869; p. 8.

• notice. The Practical Farmer 3 (1 Sept 1869); p. 140.

• “Youth’s Cabinet.” The Representative [Fox lake, Wisconsin] 8 Oct 1869; p. 3.

The Men Who Advertise. New York: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1870; p. 738. [google books]

• “Magazines, &c.” The Wilmington Post [Wilmington, North Carolina] 6 Feb 1870; p. 1.

• “Good Place for Newspapers.” The Baltimore Sun [Baltimore, Maryland] 22 June 1870; p. 1.

Geo. P. Rowell & Co.’s American Newspaper Directory. New York: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1871; p. 406; online at UNT Digital Library

• advertisement: “Boys and Girls.” St. Albans Transcript [St. Albans, Vermont] 27 Jan 1871; p. 7.

Golden Hours ; Jan 1869-1880

cover/masthead: 1869-1871

edited by: 1869-1871, Isaac W. Wiley; S. W. Williams, assistant editor

• 1872-1874, Erastus Wentworth; S. W. Williams, assistant editor

• 1875-1876, Erastus Wentworth; S. W. Williams; H. V. Osborne

• 1876-1880, Daniel Curry; H. V. Osborne

published: Cincinnati, Ohio: Hitchcock & Walden. Chicago, Illinois: Hitchcock & Walden. St. Louis, Missouri: Hitchcock & Walden.

• New York, New York: Carlton & Lanahan.

frequency: monthly; 1 vol/ year

description: 1869: 48 pp.; large octavo; page size untrimmed, 9″ h x 6.5″ w; price, $2/ year

• 1870: 52 pp.; price, $2/ year

• 1871: 54 pp.; page size untrimmed, 9″ h x 6.5″ w; price, $2/ year

• 1872: 52 pp.; large octavo; $2/ year

• 1873: 48 pp.; price, $2/ year

• Circulation, 1872, 11,000

• Religious focus: Methodist Episcopalian

relevant quotes:

• On the founding: “The General Conference of 1868 authorized the book agents at Cincinnati, O., to publish ‘a first-class illustrated monthly magazine for children and youth.’ ” [“Golden Hours”]

• Advertisements emphasized a combination of religion and education: “The ‘Golden Hours’ is designed for the Christian and moral household. It will be free from every objectionable feature, both in its matter and its illustrations, so that the most careful and judicious parents may feel entirely safe in giving it a place in their homes. A large variety of Literary Matter will be given in its pages—Tales, Travels, Biography, Science, Natural History, Incidents, etc., all tending to refine, inspire, and elevate the young reader. … It is the intention of the publishers to make this a gem of a magazine—a welcome visitor to the young people of the family.” [“Golden Hours.” White Cloud Kansas City Chief]

• The first year, the editor established the magazine’s personality: “We now close the first volume of the Golden Hours. We look back over the year’s labor and anxiety, and glance through the successive numbers, and feel like congratulating ourselves and our readers over what has certainly been quite a successful year; at least many of our friends and readers tell us so. We had many things to study and to experiment with in getting our little magazine fairly launched in the world. … We think our young friends have been able to see that, as we went along, we were gradually settling into a magazine of general interest, treating of a great variety of subjects, and adapted to boys and girls ranging from about ten to fifteen years of age. Every number has contained something for all ages between these extremes, and even something to be read by the older brothers and sisters to the ‘wee ones.’ We have given you a large variety, history, science, natural history, tales, poetry, selections from English magazines, and translations from German magazines.” [1 (Dec 1869): 575]

source of information: Dec 1869, Jan-Dec 1871 issues; notices, etc., below

available: AASHistPer, series 5

• The Vermont Christian Messenger summarized and reprinted extracts from “That Sweet Story” [24 Dec 1868; p. 2]

bibliography:

• “Children’s Magazines.” The St. Johnsbury Caledonian [St. Johnsbury, Vermont] 13 Nov 1868; p. 2.

• “Literary Notices.” Muscatine Evening Journal [Muscatine, Iowa] 14 Dec 1868; p. 2. Also, “Golden Hours.” The Highland Weekly News [Hillsboro, Ohio] 17 Dec 1868; p. 3. White Cloud Kansas Chief [White Cloud, Kansas] 17 Dec 1868; p. 2. Delaware Gazette [Delaware, Ohio] 18 Dec 1868; p. 3.

• “Golden Hours.” Vermont Christian Messenger [Montpelier, Vermont] 24 Dec 1868; p. 2.

• “The January Magazines.” New England Farmer [Boston, Massachusetts] 26 Dec 1868; p. 2.

• advertisement. Christian Advocate 44 (14 Jan 1869); p. 16.

• “Editor’s Table.” The Ladies’ Repository 29 (Feb 1869); p. 160.

• notice of June issue. The Highland Weekly News [Hillsboro, Ohio] 17 June 1869; p. 3.

• advertisement. The Tiffin Tribune [Tiffin, Ohio] 3 Dec 1869; p. 2.

• advertisement. Washington Kansas Republican [Washington, Kansas] 8 Sept 1870; p. 3.

• “Golden Hours for 1871.” The Oskaloosa Independent [Oskaloosa, Kansas] 17 Dec 1870; p. 3.

Geo. P. Rowell & Co.’s American Newspaper Directory. New York: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1872; p. 140. [archive.org]

• advertisement. Green-Mountain Freeman [Montpelier, Vermont] 15 Jan 1873; p. 3.

• “Golden Hours.” In Matthew Simpson. Cyclopaedia of Methodism, 5th rev. ed. Philadelphia: Louis H. Everts, 1883; p. 414. [google books]

Checklist of Children’s Books, 1837-1876, comp. Barbara Maxwell. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania: Special Collections, Central Children’s Department, Free Library of Philadelphia, 1975.

Children’s Periodicals of the United States, ed. R. Gordon Kelly. Westport, Connecticut & London, England: Greenwood Press, 1984.

The Sunday School Scholar ; Jan 1869-1873 “ Scholar ; 1873-1876

edited by: 1869-1870, Edward Eggleston • Selim H. Peabody

published: Chicago, Illinois: Adams, Blackmer, & Lyon Publishing Co.

frequency: monthly

description:

• 1869: 8 pp.; prices: 1 copy, 50¢/ year; 10 copies, $4/ year; 50 copies, $17.50/ year; 100 copies, $30/ year

• 1870: 16 pp.; prices: 1 copy, 50¢/ year; 10 copies, 40¢/ year each; 25+ copies, 30¢/year each

• Religious focus

relevant information:

• While the first issue was dated Jan 1869, it was published Oct 1868

• Contents of the first issue were printed in the Sunday School Teacher, also edited by Eggleston [3 (Dec 1868); p. 382]

relevant quotes:

• The paper was expected to be unique: “As projected it will be widely different from anything now in the field, and if we mistake not will command a national circulation from the start.” [“Things New and Old”]

• Eggleston explained that “Thoroughly interesting, thoroughly Christian, and utterly free from sensational stories, is the ideal aimed at in this paper.” [“The New Paper”] It was to be “a monthly eight page paper of the highest literary character, adapted to the wants of intelligent Sabbath School Scholars of every grade above the Infant Class. Avoiding the childishness so common in Sunday School literature, it will aim to interest and instruct especially the larger and more intelligent scholars, giving them a healthful literature in place of the prevalent flood of pernicious reading. It will aim, first of all, to do good in the name of the Lord Jesus Christ. It will be entirely unsectarian in character. It will aim to have every article, long and short, thoroughly interesting and able. … We have long been convinced that the religious literature furnished for young people should be as attractive as any other, while it should be most sacredly guarded from evil. It will be a contribution toward the practical solution of the difficult and important question; How shall we retain our older scholars in Sabbath School? The Sunday School Scholar will strive to make the school attractive to them.” [“Announcement”] It was later advertised as “just the thing for intelligent young people to read Sunday afternoons.” [advertisement. New Era]

• From a later advertisement: “Specially adapted to lads and misses, for whom ordinary papers have lost their charm. Articles amusing but not sensational—instructive but not pedantic. Nothing in its columns which does not inculcate valuable thought, or vital religious truth. No Sunday School can afford to do without this monthly for the oldest half of its pupils.” [“Very Cheap!”]

absorbed by: St. Nicholas

source of information: advertisements, etc., below

bibliography:

• “Things New and Old: A New Sabbath School Paper.” The Sunday School Teacher 3 (Aug 1868); p. 251.

• “The New Paper.” The Sunday School Teacher 3 (Oct 1868); p. 319.

• “Announcement.” The Sunday School Teacher 3 (Nov 1868); advertising section

• The Sunday School Scholar, for Young People. The Sunday School Teacher 3 (Nov 1868); p. 344.

• The Sunday School Scholar is out. The Sunday School Teacher 3 (Dec 1868); p. 382.

• “Get the Best.” Index Universitatis 1 (June 1869); advertising section.

• advertisement. Sara J. Timanus. The Infant Class, ed. Edward Eggleston. Chicago, Illinois: Adams, Blackmer & Lyon Publishing Co., 1870; advertising section.

• advertisement. New Era [Washington, District of Columbia] 20 Jan 1870; p. 3.

• “Very Cheap!” The Advocate [Buffalo, New York] 28 Dec 1871; p. 3.

• Franklin William Scott. Newspapers and Periodicals of Illinois. N.p.: Franklin William Scott, 1910; p. 94.

Onward ; Jan-June 1869 • Mayne Reid’s Magazine Onward ; July 1869-Feb 1870

edited by: Thomas Mayne Reid; Charles Ollivant, assistant editor

published: New York, New York: G. W. Carleton, Jan-June 1869; publisher at 119 Nassau St.

• New York, New York: Mayne Reid, July 1869-Feb 1870.

frequency: monthly; 2 vol/ year

description: Jan-June 1869: Jan, 86 pp.; Feb, 94 pp.; March, 86 pp.; April-May, 90 pp.; June, 92 pp. Page size, 8.5″ h x 5.25″ w. Price: 1869, $3.50/ year

• Stories, poems, and serialized novels apparently for teenagers

relevant quotes:

• Rumors of the magazine may have contained exaggerations: “Captain Mayne Reid is to publish a magazine in New York to be called Onward, and to be illustrated by English artists brought over for the purpose.” [“Items.” The Leavenworth Times]

• The prospectus was as exaggerated as the claim that illustrators were being brought from England: “ONWARD along the track of civilization—on towards goodness and glory—a finger-post pointing to all that is worthy of attainment—a guide to conduct the Youth of America along that path leading to the highest and noblest manhood: such is the design of Mayne Reid’s Magazine. And it is meant for the Youth of America—they who, in a few short years, will hold as in the hollow of their hand the destinies not only of America, but of mankind. Supreme satisfaction to be even the humblest guide in such a glorious march: and while acting as such, ‘Onward’ will endeavor to prove not only a sure guide, but a cheerful companion: one who, while dealing largely with the realities of life, will not forget that life has also its romance—essential to its healthy existence as the food that is eaten, or the air that is breathed. The Literature of this Magazine is intended to be of the highest character known to the pages of a periodical: since the experience of its Conductor [Mayne Reid] tells him it is not necessary to write down to the Youth of America. It will be illustrated, and to this end the best artists have been engaged.” [“Prospectus.” The Opelousas Courier]

• The Medical and Surgical Reporter was impressed: “ … We have before us the Prospectus of a new enterprise of the kind [ie., a juvenile periodical], to be edited by Capt. Mayne Reid, and published by Carleton, of New York. Its title is ‘Onward.’ We trust it will be so, and that it will carry to our homes, not light, trashy literature, but such as will tend to better prepare the little readers for the battle of this life, and to point out to them the path which leads to that which is to come. The Prospectus opens thus bravely;—‘ “Onward” along the track of civlization—on toward goodness and glory—a finger-post, pointing to all that is worthy of attainment—a guide to conduct the youth of America along that path leading to the highest and noblest manhood: such is the design of Mayne Reid’s Magazine.’ ” [“Notes on Books”] Notices are also excessive: “It is a bugal-call [sic] to the youth of Ame[r]ica, to press onward in the grand march of liberty, upward to the temple of honor, and outward against everything mean, base or vile.” [Appleton Post]

• The cover of the magazine—which shows a winged young man in armor, standing atop the earth and pointing to an eagle—sparked amusement: “A specimen title page of Mayne Reid’s new magazine, Onward, to be published in the coming year, is characteristically striking and sensational. A figure of Mayne Reid, as the ideal ‘youth of America,’ stands on the world, with feet resting on the borders of the Open Polar Sea which Dr. Hayes and others have made so many efforts to explore. The figure is colossal, the moon attaining only the height of its knees. It is partially clothed in ancient armor, and partially unclothed in the armor of the Parisian ballet. The figure wears a very large pair of wings, and with outstretched arm points a ‘slow unmoving finger’—whether of scorn or pride is the conundrum involved—at a dilapidated specimen of ornithology, which perhaps does not resemble anything else more than it resembles an eagle.” [A specimen title page] The Burlington Free Press was less nuanced: “It sports upon the cover the figure of a somewhat fleshy youth with splendid long wings, and well-stuffed calves, standing tip-toe on the North Pole, and pointing with his sinister fore finger to some sort of a fowl floating in the upper air. ‘Onward’ seems to be addressed to the bird, for how the young man can move a single step without leaving the earth alt[o]gether, we don’t see.” [19 Dec 1868]

• Hopes were high: “Mayne Reid is to be the Editor. Carleton & Reid, Publisher & Editor, two household names already well established in their respective fields of literature. There is no risk in predicting that this magazine will speedily attain a popularity and a circulation that will place it in the front rank of Juvenile Magazines where Carleton already stands as a publisher, and Capt. Mayne Reid as a writer of stories for our intelligent youth.” [“Our Book Table”: Onward. Bucyrus Journal]

• Whether or not the illustrators were imported from England, the illustrations were not universally admired: “The number before us contains eighty-six pages, and four full page illustrations, not of extraordinary excellence,” stated the Burlington Free Press. [“New Publications.” 19 Dec 1868] The Semi-Weekly Wisconsin felt that “The illustrations, of which there are several, are only passable, being faulty in execution, though reasonably good in design.” [30 Dec 1868]

• Text also came in for criticism: The Independent felt that “There is nothing very remarkable about the magazine, on the whole; but it is tolerably attractive, and is well printed and fairly illustrated.” [review] The Burlington Free Press was even less impressed: “Most of the articles seem to be of a somewhat exciting character. As to the style in which it is written, we think it susceptible of improvement. For instance, in the prospectus, evidently from Capt. Reid’s hands, he tells us that ‘in size, character, and appearance, it is the cheapest magazi[n]e that has ever been issued in this country.’ It is plain that he does not say exactly what he means. After a dirge of eight stanzas, the editor, in a note that beats Dr. Shelton Mackenzie, assures us that ‘those who read the above lines will need no interpretation to tell them that it is poetry.’ ‘Alongside them, Wolfe’s “Burial of Sir John Moore” appears but picturesque versification.’ We give the first stanza of this wonderful dirge: ‘Gone—gone—gone—/ Gone to his dreamless sleep!/ And spirits of the brave,/ Watching o’er his lone grave,/ Weep—weep—weep.’ Among the Book-notices we find a very enthusiastic commendation of Halleck: ‘not only the sweetest, but greatest poet America has yet produced.’ A stanza of ‘Marco Bozzaris’ is singled out as ‘a true poetical inspiration unequalled by anything in the English language. We say seriously unequalled, for not even did Byron come up to it.’ Mayne Reid thinks that the ‘charlatans of the age, and the press that has supported them, have hindered us from having, perhaps, one of the greatest poets the world ever saw.’ This is very hearty, if not very discriminating, praise.” [“New Publications.” 19 Dec 1868. Robert Shelton Mackenzie was a Philadelphia literary critic.] “There is too much of sameness in the body of the magazine,” grouched the Semi-Weekly Wisconsin. [30 Dec 1868]

• Reid’s portrait of the South met with disapproval. A Southern paper took it personally: “Capt. Reid seems to have mistaken himself for the harbinger of a political millennium. Full of wild Irish dreams of liberty, he condemns all who fall short of his standard erected. To use one of his own figures he seems to dip his pen in the juice of green persimmons whenever he writes of the South. His ideas of Southern life are simply the threadbare slanders of abolition orators. But such is the road to Northern patronage. How sad that those who say they love us should feast on our shame and exult in our degradation.” [“Onward.” The Biblical Recorder] The Idaho World also seemed to take it personally: “We have received the first number of a new monthly called the Onward, published in New York, and edited by that first-class literary humbug, Capt. Mayne Reid, the author of several trashy sensational (so called) ‘Novels.’ The Onward appears to be a very fit work for the support of that class who delight to harp on the ‘barbarism of slavery,’ and to studiously and systematically lie about everything connected with the people of the South, and to instil into youthful minds the belief that to hate and to persecute that people is the highest duty of a citizen, and the whole duty of a Christian. But to that other class, who believe that it is wise and good to inculcate into the minds of all the truthful and beneficent and merciful teachings of a pure Christian morality, we do not know of a more baneful publication for their perusal or patronage than this same Onward. It is onward only in the foul work of detraction, sectional hatred, and most pernicious fiction, to lure on the unwary to the grossest sins of paganism. It is a bad book for any reader; a most objectionable one for the young especially.” [“An Unworthy Magazine”] The Ouachita Telegraph was more specific: “Some of our cotemporaries recommend very highly to the people Mayne Reid’s magazine, ‘Onward.’ We are quite certain they have not read the magazine carefully. In one of his articles, Capt. Reid says that the South, in the late war, fought on the side of the Devil! We submit whether such an editor ought to be patronized in Louisiana.” [17 Feb 1869]

• The Rutland Daily Herald had qualms about Onward’s literary quality: “Captain Reid, as he himself admits, has discovered that the contents of a periodical, when written, for the most part, by a single individual, palls upon the reader. He has, therefore, given us a magazine of varied contents, but which, even now, has too much of the Indian, Mexican, and short paragraphed literature of the day.” [“April Magazines”]

• Reid apparently found himself explaining that the magazine wasn’t just for male readers: “Captain Mayne Reid, in the May number of … ‘Onward,’ makes an explanation as to its design which we think is timely and will be of service to the enterprise. He says, in dedicating it to the ‘Youth of America,’ he meant it ‘for the young manhood of America—including, also, its womanhood.’ … We recommend our young men and women to at least get a sample copy.” [“Literature and Journalism”]

• Editors seem to have approved of Reid’s plans to educate the youth of American about political systems: “ ‘Onward’ is not meant to be a mere collect of idle romance; but rather intended as a teacher. The light and cheerful reading is but designed to float the more serious and important matter; so as to bring it in contact not only with the youthful mind of America, but that more matured. The editor is one well qualified to treat of the political systems of Europe, and it is his aim to present them in forcible contrast to our own in the succeeding numbers of ‘Onward.’ ” [“Mayne Reid’s Magazine.” Quad-City Times] “Mr. Reid now claims that his coming to this country to establish this magazine is for a higher p[u]rpose than to make it a vehicle for spreading abroad mere fiction,” according to the Courier. “He has a higher aim. He has long studied the systems of the old world and the new and satisfied that the old must go down and the new be advanced to triumph before man can attain to his justly happy lot.—To promote this great work of progress he has sought this medium of communication with the mind of the world, and more especially with the mind of American youth, that through this channel his views will flow, and give impetus to the tide of progress.” [14 Jan 1869] The White Cloud Kansas Chief notes that “The editor has devoted much time to the study of European politics, and will especially aim to sustain a conviction thereby acquired, that a Republic is the only true agent of civilization.”

• Notices in late 1869 gave no hint that the magazine was not succeeding: “Captain Mayne Reid’s monthly venture has not only successfully reached the end of its first year, but has established for itself so permanent a place in periodical literature that its second and many succeeding years are matters, of course, just like the risings and settings of the sun.” [“Periodicals.” Philadelphia Inquirer 9 Dec 1869]

• Late in noticing the Jan 1870 issue, the Shippensburg News had some criticisms: “The illustrations are generally quite good, although it is distressing to have one’s imagination excited over the description of the beauty of the heroine in the Christmas story and to turn to the illustration and find the grace transformed into a shabby little charity scholar. Mayne Reid, in abandoning his special field of literature, is more venturous than successful. His poem, which is rather ambitious in design, promises to be—prosaic.” [“Our Book Table”]

• When the end of the magazine was announced, some editors seemed positively gleeful: “The publication of Mayne Reid’s Onward is to stop,” the Public Ledger announced. “It don’t pay.” [14 Feb 1870] The Buffalo Morning Express quipped, “Captain Mayne Reid’s magazine has exploded; ‘Onward’ has gone upward.” [16 Feb 1870] “Carleton is said to be about to start a new magazine,” the Burlington Free Press announced. “He disposed of Mayne Reid’s Onward some months since—to the editor; a good thing for Carleton, we should say.” [19 Feb 1870] The Bossier Banner got pithy: “Mayne Reid’s ‘Onward’ has gone underward.” [5 March 1870] Lambasting the advertising of another periodical, The Southern Home found space to call Onward “that unrivalled humbug.” [This the 24th day of March 1870]

• The gleefulness extended to reporting the amount of money Reid lost in publishing Onward: $15,000. Onward “sunk $15,000” [Indianapolis News 28 Oct 1870], “went back on [Reid] to the tune of $15,000” [Middlebury Register 8 Nov 1870], and “not only went onward, but upward, and took [Reid] with it.” [Holmes County Republican 24 Nov 1870] The New National Era went positively mock sympathetic: “Poor old Captain Mayne Reid, the champion boy’s story teller, sailed for England in the Siberia. His health is so feeble that his thorough recovery is almost despaired of. He lost a large sum in speculation in New York.” [24 Nov 1870]

• The New York World printed an essay on the failure of magazines in general, poking at Reid for his public comments on the failure of Onward and pointing out that “the amateur magazine editor and his money are soon parted” and that “[w]e are inclined to think that there are not more than three profitable magazines in this country.” [in “A Magazine Mystery”]

relevant information: The Evansville Daily Journal printed the contents of the first issue. [“Periodicals.” 24 Dec 1868] The Cecil Whig described the contents of the issue for Feb 1870. [30 Jan 1869] The Brooklyn Daily Eagle printed a lively description of the June 1869 issue, which had “an eruption of croquet.” [19 May 1869]

• The issue for March 1869 sold out and was reprinted.

• Reid wrote much of the material for the first four issues of the magazine, but in April 1869 promised that future issues would include work by other authors. [“Magazines, Etc.”] In fact, the Aug 1869 issue was entirely by American writers.

• The $15,000 Mayne Reid apparently lost by publishing Onward would have been the equivalent of 4,285 yearly subscriptions to the magazine. An equivalent magazine would be Cricket, published in 2019 at $33.95 for a year; the total for 4,285 subscriptions to Cricket would be $145,475.

source of information: Jan-June 1869 bound vol; Lyon; Kelly; OCLC; notices, etc., below

available: AASHistPer, series 5

• The Evening Telegraph [Philadelphia, Pennsylvania] reprinted parts of a piece by Reid, a section of which deals with a charge of plagiarism. [15 Jan 1869; p. 7]

• The Brooklyn Daily Eagle reprinted at least part of “A Dead Man Defended,” about Edgar Allan Poe. [29 March 1869]

bibliography:

• “Items.” The Leavenworth Times [Leavenworth, Kansas] 2 Oct 1868; p. 1.

• The Richmond Weekly Dispatch. Alexandria Gazette [Alexandria, Virginia] 31 Oct 1868; p. 2.

• A specimen title page. The Brooklyn Daily Eagle [Brooklyn, New York] 5 Nov 1868; p. 2.

• “Onward.” Reading Times [Reading, Pennsylvania] 6 Nov 1868; p. 2. Also, Manhattan Nationalist [Manhattan, Kansas] 7 Nov 1868; p. 3.

• “Our Book Table”: Onward. Bucyrus Journal [Bucyrus, Ohio] 13 Nov 1868; p. 3.

• “Children’s Magazines.” The St. Johnsbury Caledonian [St. Johnsbury, Vermont] 13 Nov 1868; p. 2.

• “Notes on Books.” Medical and Surgical Reporter 19 (21 Nov 1868); p. 426.

• “Onward.” Reading Times [Reading, Pennsylvania] 15 Dec 1868; p. 3.

• Onward is the title of a new magazine. Mercersburg Journal [Mercersburg, Pennsylvania] 18 Dec 1868; p. 2.

• Mayne Reid’s Onward. The Burlington Free Press [Burlington, Vermont] 19 Dec 1868; p. 6.

• “Onward, Boys!” Public Ledger [Memphis, Tennessee] 21 Dec 1868; p. 3.

• “Onward.” The Biblical Recorder [Raleigh, North Carolina] 23 Dec 1868; p. 3.

• “Periodicals”: Onward. The Evansville Daily Journal [Evansville, Indiana] 24 Dec 1868; p. 2.

• review. The Independent 20 (24 Dec 1868); p. 6.

• “The January magazines.” New England Farmer [Boston, Massachusetts] 26 Dec 1868; p. 2.

• “Onward.” Semi-Weekly Wisconsin [Milwaukee, Wisconsin] 30 Dec 1868; p. 3.

• The first number of Mayne Reid’s Monthly Magazine. The Wyandot Pioneer [Upper Sandusky, Ohio] 31 Dec 1868; p. 3.

• “Reviews and Book Notices.” Medical and Surgical Reporter 20 (2 Jan 1869); p. 12.

• “Mayne Reid’s Magazine.” Quad-City Times [Davenport, Iowa] 6 Jan 1869; p. 2.

• Mayne Reid’s Magazine, Onward. Appleton Post [Appleton, Wisconsin] 7 Jan 1869; p. 3.

• The first number of Capt. Mayne Reid’s new magazine. The Lawrence Tribune [Lawrence, Kansas] 7 Jan 1868; p. 3.

Geo. P. Rowell & Co’s American Newspaper Directory. New York: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1869; p. 77. [archive.org]

• “Onward.” White Cloud Kansas Chief [White Cloud, Kansas] 7 Jan 1869; p. 2.

• “Mayne Reid’s Magazine.” Sugar Planter [Port Allen, Loouisiana] 9 Jan 1869; p. 2.

• “Onward.” The Courier [Waterloo, Iowa] 14 Jan 1869; p. 4.

• The February number. The Evening Telegraph 15 Jan 1869; p. 7.

• “New Publications”: Onward. Vermont Journal [Windsor, Vermont] 16 Jan 1869; p. 1.

• “Publications”: Onward. Carolina Watchman [Salisbury, North Carolina] 22 Jan 1869; p. 2.

• “Onward.” Mercersburg Journal [Mercersburg, Pennsylvania] 29 Jan 1869; p. 2.

• “An Unworthy Magazine.” The Idaho World [Idaho City, Idaho] 28 Jan 1869; p. 1.

• “Onward.” The Cecil Whig [Elkton, Maryland] 30 Jan 1869; p. 2.

• “Onward.” Lancaster Intelligencer [Lancaster, Pennsylvania] 3 Feb 1869; p. 3.

• “Prospectus.” The Opelousas Courier [Opelousas, Louisiana] 6 Feb 1869; p. 2.

• “Prospectus of ‘Onward.’ ” Fayetteville Weekly Democrat [Fayetteville, Arkansas] 13 Feb 1869; p. 3.

• Some of our cotemporaries. The Ouachita Telegraph [Monroe, Louisiana] 17 Feb 1869; p. 2.

• “Late Publications”: Onward. Raftsman’s Journal [Clearfield, Pennsylvania] 3 March 1869; p. 3.

• The March number. The Cecil Whig [Elkton, Maryland] 6 March 1869; p. 2.

• “New Publications.” Massachusetts Ploughman and New England Journal of Agriculture 28 (6 March 1869); p. 2.

• “Prospectus.” St. Landry Democrat [Opelousas, Louisiana] 13 March 1869; p. 1.

• “Onward.” The Watertown News [Watertown, Wisconsin] 17 March 1869; p. 2.

• “Magazines, Etc.” The Daily Phoenix [Columbia, South Carolina] 24 March 1869; p. 2.

• “The Magaznes for April.” The Burlington Free Press [Burlington, Vermont] 27 March 1869; p. 1.

• “Review of New Books.” The Evening Telegraph [Philadelphia, Pennsylvania] 27 March 1869; p. 6.

• “Literary.” Lawrence Daily Journal [Lawrence, Kansas] 28 March 1869; p. 3.

• “New Publications.” The Brooklyn Daily Eagle [Brooklyn, New York] 29 March 1869; p. 4.

• advertisement. American Phrenological Journal 49 (April 1869); p. 168.

• “April Magazines.” Rutland Daily Herald [Rutland, Vermot] 8 April 1869; p. 3.

• “Literature and Journalism.” Delaware Tribune [Wilmington, Delaware] 22 April 1869; p. 2.

• “New Publications.” The Brooklyn Daily Eagle [Brooklyn, New York] 19 May 1869; p. 4.

• Mayne Reid’s magazine. Fayetteville Observer [Fayetteville, Tennessee] 24 June 1869; p. 2.

• “New Publications": Onward. The Watertown News [Watertown, Wisconsin] 14 July 1869; p. 2.

• “Onward.” The St. Cloud Jornal [St. Cloud, Minnesota] 22 July 1869; p. 2.

• “Periodicals”: Onward. The Philadelphia Inquirer [Philadelphia, Pennsylvania] 9 Dec 1869; p. 3.

• “A Magazine Mystery.” The Daily Evening Telegraph [Philadelphia, Pennsylvania] 12 Feb 1870; p. 2.

• The publication of Mayne Reid’s Onward. Public Ledger [Memphis, Tennessee] 14 Feb 1870; p. 1.

• Captain Mayne Reid’s magazine. Buffalo Morning Express and Illustrated Buffalo Express [Buffalo, New York] 16 Feb 1870; p. 2.

Harper’s Monthly. The Burlington Free Press [Burlington, Vermont] 19 Feb 1870; p. 3.

• “Our Book Table”: Onward, for January. The Shippensburg News [Shippensburg, Pennsylvania] 19 Feb 1870; p. 2.

• Mayne Reid’s “Onward.” The Bossier Banner [Bellevue, Louisiana] 5 March 1870; p. 2.

• This the 24th day of March, 1870. The Southern Home [Charlotte, North Carolina] 31 March 1870; p. 2.

• Mayne Reid is said to have lost. Holmes County Republican [Millersburg, Ohio] 24 Nov 1870; p. 2.

• Poor old Captain Mayne Reid. New National Era [Washington, District of Columbia] 24 Nov 1870; p. 1.

• Captain Mayne Reid’s Onward. The Indianapolis News [Indianapolis, Indiana] 28 Oct 1870; p. 2.

• The publication of magazines. Middlebury Register [Middlebury, Vermont] 8 Nov 1870; p. 2.

• Betty Longenecker Lyon. “A History of Children’s Secular Magazines Published in the United States from 1789-1899.” PhD diss. Johns Hopkins, 1942; p. 261.

Children’s Periodicals of the United States, ed. R. Gordon Kelly. Westport, Connecticut & London, England: Greenwood Press, 1984.

Sunday School Companion ; Jan 1869-1904

published: Chicago, Illinois: Holy Family Sunday School Association.

frequency: monthly

description: Page size, 10.25″ h • Religious focus: Catholic

source of information: OCLC; ULS

available: AASHistPer, series 5 (1876 only)

The Young Crusader (also Young Crusader) ; Jan 1869-Oct 1875?

cover/masthead: 1869-1870

edited by: 1872-1874, William Byrne

published: Boston, Massachusetts; publisher at 12 West St. (P. O. Box 4376), 1870. Publisher at 12 West & 1201 Washington Streets, 1871

• Bound volumes: Boston, Massachusetts: Kivlan & Cashman, 1869-1872. Boston, Massachusetts: the Young Crusader Office, 1874. Boston, Massachusetts: J. Cashman, 1876.

frequency: monthly

description: 1870-1872: 32 pp.; page size, 9.75″ h x 7″ w

• Prices: 1869, 50¢/ year. 1870-1872, $1/ year

• 1875: 40 pp.; prices: 1 copy, $1.50/ year; 3 copies, $3.75/ year

• Circulation: 1872, 5,000

• Religious focus: Catholic

relevant information: The publishing house for the Crusader also published a number of books on Catholicism for children and adults.

relevant quote: “The religious tone of The Young Crusader is never marred by the tract-shop twang.” [Catholic Union and Times]

source of information: NUC; OCLC; AASHistPer; notices, etc., below

available: AASHistPer, series 5

bibliography:

• “Late Papers. Public Ledger [Memphis, Tennessee] 3 April 1869; p. 3.

• We have received specimen copies. The Daily Standard [Raleigh, North Carolina] 3 June 1869; p. 3.

• “Literary Gossip.” Hartford Courant [Hartford, Connecticut] 3 June 1869; p. 2.

• notice. The Burlington Free Press [Burlington, Vermont] 17 July 1869; p. 1.

The Men Who Advertise. New York: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1870; p. 666. [google books]

• advertisement for canvassers. The Morning Star and Catholic Messenger [New Orleans, Louisiana] 20 Feb 1870; p. 8.

• notice of publications by the publisher. The McArthur Enquirer [McArthur, Ohio] 11 May 1870; p. 3.

• advertisement. The Morning Star and Catholid Messenger [New Orleans, Louisiana] 28 Aug 1870; p. 7.

• “Recent Publications.” The San Francisco Examiner [San Francisco, California] 16 Sept 1871; p. 3.

Geo. P. Rowell & Co.’s American Newspaper Directory. New York: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1872; p. 75. [archive.org]

• advertisement. The Morning Star and Catholic Messenger [New Orleans, Louisiana] 3 March 1872; p. 2.

• “The Young Crusader.” Catholic Union and Times [Buffalo, New York] 19 Dec 1872; p. 5.

• advertisement. The Morning Star and Catholic Messenger [New Orleans, Louisiana] 29 Dec 1872; p. 5.

• advertisement. The Morning Star and Catholic Messenger [New Orleans, Louisiana] 27 Dec 1874; p. 5.

The Young American ; April-Dec 1869

edited by: J. E. Baker; F. W. Breed, jr; W. H. Marvin; W. P. Dean; Porter Norton

published: Buffalo, New York: Young American.

frequency: monthly

description: Page size, 11.75″ h • Amateur publication

source of information: AAS catalog; OCLC; NUC

bibliography:

• “Our Letter Bag.” Oliver Optic’s Magazine: Our Boys and Girls 5 (12 June 1869); p. 383.

The Young Minnesotian ; 19 April 1869-6 Dec 1870

edited by: 19 April-14 Dec 1869, G. M. Naylor • 19 April-27 July, 10 Aug-14 Dec 1869, F. M. Reid

• 10 Aug 1869-22 Feb 1870, W. E. Winn & C. J. Wright

published: Minneapolis, Minnesota: Minnesotian Printing Co.

frequency: weekly: Tuesday

description: 4 pp.; page size, 21″ h x 14″ w; price, 75¢/ year

• Circulation: 1870, 1000?

relevant information: In a list of amateur periodicals in Thomas G. Harrison, The Career and Reminiscences of an Amateur Journalist, and a History of Amateur Journalism (Indianapolis, Indiana, 1883; p. 27. [google books]). But, the Minnesotian was treated as a professional periodical by the Minneapolis Tribune in 1870.

source of information: Sportsman ; Rowell; Catalogue ; online catalog of Minnesota State Historical Society

bibliography:

The Men Who Advertise. New York: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1870; p. 676. [google books]

• advertisement. The Young Sportsman 1 (Jan 1870); p. 8.

• “The Workshop of the Northwest: Fourth Annual Report of Manufacturing Industry at the Falls of St. Anthony.” The Minneapolist Tribune 17 April 1870; p. 2.

Catalogue of the Library of the Minnesota Historical Society. St. Paul, Minnesota: The Pioneer Press Company, 1888; vol 2, p. 832. [google books]

Scattered Seeds ; Fifth month (May) 1869-1935

cover/masthead: 1871 | 1872

edited by: 1871-1872, L. H. Hall?; at Box 681, West Chester, Pennsylvania

published: West Chester, Pennsylvania: First Day School Association of Philadelphia.

frequency: monthly; 1 vol/ year

description: 1870: 8 pp.

• 1871: 4 pp.; quarto; page size untrimmed, 12″ h x 9″ w; price, 1 copy, 50¢/ year; 10 copies, each 40¢/ year; 20+ copies, each 30¢/ year

• 1872: 16 pp.; page size untrimmed, 8.25″ h x 6.5″ w; price, 1 copy, 50¢/ year; 10 copies, $4/ year; 20 copies, $7/ year

• Religious focus: Society of Friends (Quaker)

relevant quotes:

• Description: “Six pages are devoted to Juvenile literature, illustrated by appropriate cuts, and two pages to First-day School matters. Its success the first year exceeded our expectaions, but to meet expenses it will require a circulation of at least 4000 copies, which is much beyond its present issue. That number has been directed to be printed on the responsibility of the Association, and it is necessary that subscribers be found for them.” [“Scattered Seeds.” Friends’ Intelligencer]

• On the new page size, 1872: “We hope our readers will like our new garb. It will certainly be more convenient, and will be in better shape for binding. We intend to present the usual variety of good reading matter, and good illustrations. Some of our patrons are still desirous that we should publish Scattered Seeds weekly or semi-monthly. We must still answer, we would be glad to do so, but cannot while our present issue does not sustain itself. Aid us all you can friends by sending in clubs, single names and contributions for the cause.” [“Our New Volume.” 4 (Fifth month, 1872); pp. 15-16]

source of information: 1871-1872, scattered issues; OCLC

available: AASHistPer, series 5

bibliography:

• “Scattered Seeds.” Friends’ Intelligencer 27 (28 May 1870); p. 8.

• “Appeal to ‘Friends’ and Other Friends of the Colored People.” Friends’ Intelligencer 41 (20 Sept 1884); p. 503.

• advertisement. Friends’ Intelligencer 66 (11 Sept 1909); p. 1.

The Little Sunbeam (also, Sunbeam) ; June-after Nov 1869

edited by: James Marsh Long

published: Washington, North Carolina: Frank P. Durand. Washington, North Carolina: Long, Durand & Co. Washington, North Carolina: Long & Durand

frequency: bimonthly

description: Prices: 3 months, 25¢; 6 months, 50¢

• Issue #1 was available by 8 June 1869; issue #2 was available by 19 June 1869

relevant information: At least 7 issues

relevant quotes:

• From the advertisement: The paper “[i]s devoted to the Interests, Education, Amusement and Entertainment of the Children. It is edited and published by boys. Its typographical appearance is unexcelled in beauty. A host of able writers contribute to its columns, comprising some of the greatest intellects of this country. Among whom may be reckoned the Poet Wm. H. Carty, and that Novelist Alexis De Bar. The Sunbeam contains original stories, Biographical Sketches, Histrionic [sic] Tales, Original and Selected Poetry, Lessons for the Young, Comic Sketches, Miscellaneous Articles, Rebuses, Enigmas, Puzzles, Editorial &c. Will commence the publication in No 7 of [a new] serial Story, to be entitled Salanio, OR THE MASKED FACE. BY ALEXIS DE BAR.” [advertisement 24 Aug 1869]

• The first issue wasn’t to the taste of all: “If the selected articles are such as wil[l] amuse and interest the children, and the original matter the same, it will be a good thing; but we fear the first article in the first number is not just the thing for children. There are too many swearing words in it.” [“New Children’s Paper”]

• The second issue was an improvement: “The little Sunbeam … comes this week with more reading matter, and a better appearance every way. There is good grit in those boys.” [19 June 1869]

source of information: notices, etc., below

bibliography:

• “New Children’s Paper.” The New Berne Times [New Berne, North Carolina] 8 June 1869; p. 3.

• The little Sunbeam. The New Berne Times [New Berne, North Carolina] 19 June 1869; p. 3.

• advertisement. The Eastern Intelligencer [Washington, North Carolina] 24 Aug 1869; p. 1.

• advertisement. The Eastern Intelligencer [Washington, North Carolina] 2 Nov 1869; p. 4.

The Junior ; June 1869-after Nov 1870

edited by: Charles H. Philips

published: Kokomo, Indiana: Charles H. Philips

description: Prices: 1 copy, 25¢/ year; 3 copies, 65¢/ year; 5 copies, $1/ year; 10 copies, $2/ year; 20 copies, $4/ year; 30 copies, $6/ year

relevant information:

• Charles was 14 years old while publishing his paper.

• T. C. Philips, Charles’ father, published the Kokomo Tribune, where the Junior was advertised.

• The last advertisement for the Junior appeared in Oct 1870; extracts from the periodical were reprinted well into 1871.

relevant quotes:

• Advertisements emphasized the entrepreneurial spirit of the editor: “It is edited and published by Charlie H. Philips, who sets his own type, manages his own business and gets the proceeds.”

• Charles’ father, however, gave the paper a boost, promoting it in an editorial paragraph: “Attention is directed to the advertisement of ‘The Junior.’ It is edited, published and printed by a young Philips who seems to be very much interested in it. The boy desires to get the paper upon a paying basis without the use of much advertising. Are there not several hundred parents in this county who can afford to give one of their children a quarter to get The Junior? The paper has some very excellent reading and it is certainly worth the money it costs. Besides aspiring boys, whether they are farmer, mechanics or printers deserve encouragement. We hope to hear that The Junior is getting a large subscription list.” [“The Junior”]

• T. C. Philips wasn’t above joking about a supposed rivalry among the publishers in his family in an answer to a comment by another newspaper editor: “Does Philips want to get rid of a business rival?—Democrat. How could one want to get rid of what does not exist? The ‘Junior’ comes nearer being a ‘business rival’ than any paper ever projected here and that is all in the family.” [Kokomo Tribune 7 July 1870]

• Charles presented himself as a model of independence and energy: “The editor of this paper, who is fourteen years old, not large of his age, nor of rugged physical constitution, besides the work on this paper, is earning, every day, about one dollar and fifty cents. In addition to this, he does a great many ‘chores,’ such as marketing, &c., and yet has plenty of time for play and a spare day every now and then to go away or to spend at home. ‘How can I do this,’ do you ask? We will tell you: Learn a trade, one suited to your tastes, and then be sober, industrious and stick to it. Don’t change about. Excel in something. The capacity to hang on and to do well something useful, will secure to any boy independence.” [“A Little Egotism”]

source of information: pieces listed below

available: Pieces were reprinted in two Indiana newspapers:

• “Tricky Boys”: The Kokomo Tribune [Kokomo, Indiana; 9 June 1870; p. 1]

• “A Little Egotism”: The okomo Tribune [Kokomo, Indiana; 21 July 1870; p. 4]

• “Candidates”: The Kokomo Tribune [Kokomo, Indiana; 20 Oct 1870; p. 4]

• joke: The Cambridge City Tribune [Cambridge City, Indiana; 2 Nov 1871; p. 1]

• “Another Word About Boys”: The Cambridge City Tribune [Cambridge City, Indiana; 9 Nov 1871; p. 1]

bibliography:

• advertisement. The Kokomo Tribune [Kokomo, Indiana] 26 May 1870; p. 2. Also, 14 July 1870; p. 2.

• “The Junior.” The Kokomo Tribune [Kokomo, Indiana] 26 May 1870; p. 4.

• Does Philips want. The okomo Tribune [Kokomo, Indiana] 7 July 1870; p. 2.

• “A Little Egotism.” The Kokomo Tribune [Kokomo, Indiana] 21 July 1870; p. 4.

• 25 cents. The Kokomo Tribune [Kokomo, Indiana] 20 Oct 1870; p. 4.

• advertisement. The Kokomo Tribune [Kokomo, Indiana] 20 Oct 1870; p. 2. Also, Kokomo Tribune [Kokomo, Indiana] 27 Oct 1870; p. 3

• “The Kokomo Tribune.” The Noblesville Ledger [Noblesville, Indiana] 2 Nov 1870; p. 2.

• “Town Talk.” The Kokomo Tribune [Kokomo, Indiana] 24 Nov 1870; p. 3.

The Bright Side ; July 1869-abt Nov 1871 • The Bright Side and Family Circle ; Dec 1871-after 29 June 1873

cover/masthead: 1870 | 1871

edited by: John B. Alden, 1869-1870; Amelia E. Daley, associate editor, 1870

• C. G. G. Paine, 1871-1873

published: Chicago, Illinois: John B. Alden & Co.; printed by Church, Goodman & Donnelley? (printers at 108 & 110 Dearborn St), July 1869-1870?. 1869: publisher also listed as Alden & True; publisher at 239 West Madison St.

• Chicago, Illinois: Bright Side Co., Jan 1871-1873?; at 154 Washington St., Oct 1870-1871

frequency: 1869-April 1870: monthly

• May-Dec 1870: monthly, weekly, or semimonthly

• Jan-Nov 1871: weekly (Thursday) or semimonthly

• 1872: monthly

• 1873: weekly

description:

• July-Dec 1869: 8 pp.; 25¢/ year

• Jan-April 1870: 16 pp. (includes 3 pages of advertising); page size, 13″ h x 9.5″ w; price, 50¢/ year; single copy, 5¢ • May-Dec 1870: weekly, 8 pp. • prices: monthly, 25¢/ year; semimonthly, 50¢/ year; weekly, $1/ year

• Jan-Nov 1871: weekly: 8 pp.; price, $1/ year; page size untrimmed, 12.5″ h x 9.5″ w • semimonthly: 4 pp.; 25¢/ year; page size untrimmed, 12.5″ h x 9.5″ w

• 1872: 8 pp.; page size 26″ h x 20″ w; price, 50¢/ year

• 1873, 11.75″ h; price, $1.60/ year

• March 1870 is vol 2 #3 (whole number 9) • AAS copies: vol 1 #1 (July 1869)-vol 3 #55 (6 April 1871); vol 3 #58 (27 April 1871); 29 June 1873 issue of Bright Side and Family Circle is vol 5 #26 (whole #119)

• Feb 1870: 20,000 copies printed

• Circulation: March 1870, 25,000. 1872, abt 5,000

relevant information:

• Beginning with the March 1870 issue, the periodical was electrotyped, “so we can print as they are wanted.” [2 (March 1870: 16]

• Statistics: 1870: “The Bright Side now uses paper at the rate of about twenty tons a year, printing nearly one million papers.” [The Rock Island Argus 6 Oct 1870]

• “As an evidence of the prosperity of The Bright Side, the publishers of that paper speak of the receipt of over 160 letters a day, on an average, during the fifteen dull days previous to October 10.” [Star and Enterprise 10 Nov 1870]

• Alden also published Bright Side Stories

• 1871: The semimonthly edition was intended for Sunday schools

• The masthead changed on 9 Feb 1871: “Something new in our head—paper’s head, we mean—this week. We hope it is but a symbol of what occurs to our individual heads every day! Those neat, vine-bordered ovals, we intend shall be pretty enough and good enough to notice every week.” [3 (9 Feb 1871); p. 6]

• Much was made of the publisher purchasing the plate for a steel engraving of a portrait of Washington Irving; prints from the plate were sent to subscribers as premiums in 1871. [“The ‘Sunny Side’ Author and ‘The Bright Side’ ”]

• Pieces may have been reprinted in Bright Side Stories, published by J. S. Goodman & Co., 1871.

• C. G. G. Paine, who edited the Bright Side 1871 through 1873, was a teacher in the Chicago High School. [When providing your supply of reading for the year]

relevant quotes:

• An early advertisement promised great things: “Its mission is to picture for its readers the ‘bright side’ of the world as it is, has been, will be and should be; remembering too, the brighter world beyond. The price is so low that it is emphatically ‘a paper for all children.’ The poorest may get it and the more well-to-do will find it a treasure worth possessing.” [Fort Scott Weekly Press 6 Aug 1869]

• The Bright Side was compared with more than one other periodical: it was “something after the plan of the The Little Corporal” [Fort Scott Weekly Monitor 4 Aug 1869]; and an uninformed Pennsylvania paper felt that it “promises to become, if it is not already so, a formidable competitor to the The Little Pilgrim,” which had ceased publication in Philadelphia 11 months earlier. [“Literary”]

• The relative ease of divorce in Chicago appears to have caused North Carolinian editors some unhappy moments. A Wilmington, North Carolina, paper used a notice of the Bright Side to poke at Chicagoans: “ “Chicago has a new children’s paper called the “Bright Side” ’! We didn’t know Chicago people stayed married long enough ta [sic] have any children.” [Wilmington Morning Star] A Charlotte, North Carolina, paper savaged the topics of divorce, the Bright Side’s suggested notices and advertisements, and some of the paper’s comments on the Civil War, ending with the editor tossing the sample paper into the fire, where it made “a nice, ‘bright’ blaze.” [This the 24th day of March, 1870]

• Advertisements promised much of the text: “[Bright Side] is decidedly a bright, glowing gem of a journal for young folks and very interesting for adults to peruse. It will gather around you your little ones, in deep and earnest attention, as you read from its pages its beautiful stories, and their little minds will become stored with knowledge and their souls adorned by Christian virtues.” [“The Bright Side.” The Girard Press] The text was special: “Too many of the papers for young people are filled with mere trash. A few are furnishing a better kind of reading matter; matter that is instructive and amusing at the same time. Eventually our writers for the young will come up to the level of the intellects of young folks, and not insult them with baby talk of the namby pambiest character.” [For Wayne Daily Gazette 18 May 1870] This was, one paper asserted, because “We don’t know Mr. Alden [the publisher] personally, but we can vouch for it that he has some bright little faces in his home, he knows so well how to write and print what will please them. This is no small gift and art.” [The Daily Kansas Tribune 15 July 1870]

• Advertisements weren’t above sparking guilt in parents: “If parents would only spend the money they pay for foolish toys and sweet-meats in subscribing for some nice little paper like the Bright Side, for their children, how much better it would be for them. Many parents spend weekly more money in that manner than it would take to furnish their little ones with such a paper for a year. Instead of feeding their tender minds they are weakening them and their body by such indulgence. Think of this, all ye who have the care of such responsibilities, and govern yourselves accordingly.” [“A Word to Parents”]

• “Unexcelled in beauty. The cheapest paper in the world. Vigorous and lively. Thoroughly Christian. … The largest circulation of any children’s paper or magazine in the world, considering the length of time published.” [The Children’s Hour (Oct 1870): inside back cover (cover page 3)]

• Like a number of papers, the Bright Side relied on young boys to distribute it: “50 Boys Wanted. One or more from each public school in the city [Chicago, Illinois]; must be from 12 to 15 years of age, and come well recommended by their teachers. Good pay for work Saturday afternoons. Call between 4 and 6 this p.m.” [“50 Boys Wanted”]

• The Bright Side Company was incorporated Jan 1871: “The Bright Side a sprightly and well edited paper for juveniles, became, on the 1st inst., the property of the Bright Side Company, a corporation, of Chicago, organized under the laws of Illinois, with a capital of $50,000.” [Delaware Gazette 6 Jan 1871]

• Description of contents, 1871: “Serial Stories by some of the ablest known writers in the United States. Short Stories complete in each number … Poetry … Topics of the Times … News of All Sorts which is or ought to be of interest to young people. Scientific Articles … Biographical Sketches of men and women of times past and present whose lives are worthy of observation. Historical Articles … Stories of Travel and Adventure … Knowledge and Good Nature containing the wit, humor and pithy facts of the times. Bright Side Sermons“. [The Saturday Evening Press 7 Jan 1871]

• The Chicago Fire forced the merger of Bright Side with a periodical titled the Family Circle: “The Bright Side and the Family Circle … have been consolidated since the fire, and now appear in attractive form, under the editorial management of Mr. C. G. G. Paine, and the business management of the ‘Bright Side Co.’ ” [“The Magazines”] The semimonthly edition of the Bright Side became The Child’s Friend (1872-after 1873)

• Though the Bright Side Company advertised for printers and agents through July 1873, efforts to keep the Friend and its companion Bright Side alive failed, and the business went bankrupt, owing subscribers about $500. In 1874, the bankruptcy was finalized: “In the matter of the Bright Side Company, George W. Campbell, the Assignee, filed a petition stating that the Company issued two publlications, the Bright Side Family Circle and the Child’s Friend. There is due to subscribers on these papers about $500, and due the Company on unpaid subscriptions $200. Alfred Martin, of Philadelphia, has agreed to take the burden of filling the subscriptions on condition of receiving an assignment of the debts due, and the Assignee asks that such an arrangement may be allowed, which was granted.” [“The Courts”]

became:

The Bright Side and Family Circle ; 1872-1873

The Child’s Friend ; 1872-after 1873

source of information: Saturday Evening Post ; March 1870, 9 Feb 1871, 12 Aug 1871 issues; Children’s Hour; Golden Hours; AAS catalog; Rowell; notices, etc., below

available: AASHistPer, series 5

• “Gran’ Ma Al’ As Does,” a poem by A. H. Poe, was reprinted in The Leavenworth Times [Leavenworth, Kansas; 23 Sept 1870; p. 2.].

bibliography:

• notice of issue 1. Monongahela Valley Republican [Monongahela, Pennsylvania] 15 July 1869; p. 4.

• notice. Fort Scott Weekly [Fort Scott, Kansas] 4 Aug 1869; p. 5.

• “The Bright Side.” The Fort Scott Weekly Press [Fort Scott, Kansas] 6 Aug 1869; p. 2.

• advertisement. Saturday Evening Post 4 Sept 1869; p. 7.

• notice of Sept issue. Atchison Daily Patriot [Atchison, Kansas] 9 Sept 1869; p. 4. Also, Belmont Chronicle [Saint Clairsville, Ohio] 9 Sept 1869; p. 3.

• Chicago has a new children’s paper. The Wilmington Morning Star [Wilmington, North Carolina] 23 Sept 1869; p. 3.

• advertisement. The Children’s Hour (Oct 1870): inside back cover (cover page 3).

• notice of Oct issue. White Cloud Kansas Chief [White Cloud, Kansas] 7 Oct 1869; p. 2.

• advertisement. White Cloud Kansas Chief [White Cloud, Kansas] 7 Oct 1869; p. 3.

• notice of Nov issue. Albany Ledger [Albany, Missouri] 4 Nov 1869; p. 3.

• notice of Dec issue. The Atchison Daily Champion [Atchison, Kansas] 25 Nov 1869; p. 3. Also, The Highland Weekly News [Hillsboro, Ohio] 9 Dec 1869; p. 2.

• “A Surprise.” The Rock Island Argus [Rock Island, Illinois] 3 Jan 1870; p. 4.

• “Look at The Bright Side.” New England Farmer [Boston, Massachusetts] 19 Feb 1870; p. 3.

• “The Bright Side.” The Watertown News [Watertown, Wisconsin] 16 March 1870; p. 3. Also, Vernon County Censor [Viroqua, Wisconsin] 16 March 1870; p. 2.

• “Send for The Bright Side.” The Saturday Evening Press [Menasha, Wisconsin] 19 March 1870; p. 3.

• “The Bright Side.” The Girard Press [Girard, Kansas] 24 March 1870; p. 3.

• notice of March issue. The Lincoln County Herald [Troy, Missouri] 24 March 1870; p. 3.

• “Literary.” The Luzerne Union [Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania] 30 March 1870; p. 2.

• This the 24th day of March, 1870. The Southern Home [Charlotte, North Carolina] 31 March 1870; p. 2.

• notice. Fort Wayne Daily Gazette [Fort Wayne, Indiana] 18 May 1870; p. 4.

• notice of May issue. The Lincoln County Herald [Troy, Missouri] 19 May 1870; p. 3.

• “The Bright Side, a Paper for All Children.” New England Farmer [Boston, Massachusetts] 4 June 1870; p. 3.

• notice of weekly issues. Vernon County Censor [Viroqua, Wisconsin] 29 June 1870; p. 2.

• “A Word to Parents.” Nebraska Advertiser [Brownville, Nebraska] 30 June 1870; p. 1.

• “The Bright Side.” The Atchison Daily Champion [Atchison, Kansas] 3 July 1870; p. 4.

• “The Bright Side.” The Daily Kansas Tribune [Lawrence, Kansas] 15 July 1870; p. 3.

• One hundred Dollars in Gold. Urbana Union [Urbana, Ohio] 10 Aug 1870; p. 3.

• The Bright Side offers. The Daily Kansas Tribune [Lawrence, Kansas] 10 Aug 1870; p. 3.

• The publishers of the Bright Side. The Leavenworth Bulletin [Leavenworth, Kansas] 10 Sept 1870; p. 4. Also, The Herald directs attention. St. Joseph Saturday Herald [Saint Joseph, Michigan] 17 Sept 1870; p. 1.

• “50 Boys Wanted.” Chicago Tribune [Chicago, Illinois] 5 Oct 1870; p. 1.

• The Bright Side now uses paper. The Rock Island Argus [Rock Island, Illinois] 5 Oct 1870; p. 1.

• “50,000 Boys and Girls.” The McArthur Enquirer [McArthur, Ohio] 19 Oct 1870; p. 2.

• A new book. The Star and Enterprise [Newville, Pennsylvania] 3 Nov 1870; p. 2.

• Amelia E. Daley. Manhattan Nationalist [Manhattan, Kansas] 4 Nov 1870; p. 2.

• As an evidence of the prosperity. The Star and Enterprise [Newville, Pennsylvania] 10 Nov 1870; p. 2.

• advertisement. Christian Union 2 (19 Nov 1870); p. 305.

• W. W. D. “Letter from Illinois.” The Daily Evening Express [Lancaster, Pennsylvania] 21 Dec 1870; p. 2.

• “Our Book Table.” The Leavenworth Times [Leavenworth, Kansas] 29 Dec 1870; p. 2.

• “Books and Periodicals”: The Bright Side. Delaware Gazette [Delaware, Ohio] 6 Jan 1871; p. 3.

• “The Bright Side.” The Saturday Evening Press [Menasha, Wisconsin] 7 Jan 1871; p. 2.

• “The Bright Side.” New England Farmer [Boston, Massachusetts] 7 Jan 1871; p. 4.

• “Bright Side.” Kansas Farmer [Topeka, Kansas] 15 Jan 1871; p. 16.

• “Periodicals”: The Bright Side. The Morning Democrat [Davenport, Iowa] 19 Jan 1871; p. 4.

• “The Bright Side for 1871.” The Highland Weekly News [Hillsboro, Ohio] 2 Feb 1871; p 3.

The Bright Side for Jan. 26th. The Holt County Sentinel [Oregon, Missouri] 10 Feb 1871; p. 3.

• notice. The Saturday Evening Press [Menasha, Wisconsin] 11 Feb 1871; p. 3.

• “Sparks from the Bright Side.” The St. Cloud Journal [Saint Cloud, Minnesota] 6 April 1871; p. 2.

• “The Bright Side.” Herald and Tribune [Jonesborough, Tennessee] 13 April 1871; p. 3.

• notice of “Sparks from the Bright Side.” Albany Ledger [Albany, Missouri] 13 April 1871; p. 3.

• “The Bright Side.” The Holt County Sentinel [Oregon, Missouri] 14 April 1871; p. 3.

• “The ‘Sunny Side’ Author and ‘The Bright Side.’ ” Richmond Weekly Palladium [Richmond, Indiana] 15 April 1871; p. 2.

• “Agents Wanted for Bright Side Stories.” The Atchison Daily Champion [atchison, Kansas] 15 April 1871; p. 1.

• “A Good Thing.” The Woodstock Sentinel [Woodstock, Illinois] 13 April 1871; p. 3. Also, The Daily Commonwealth [Topeka, Kansas] 16 April 1871; p. 4.

• notice. Christian World 22 (May 1871); p. 175.

• “The Bright Side.” Bedford County Press and Everett Press [Everett, Pennsylvania] 31 May 1871; p. 4.

• notice. Christian World 22 (June 1871); p. 207.

• advertisement. Golden Hours, 3 (June 1871); p. 2, advertising section.

• The publishers of the Bright Side. Alma News [Alma, Kansas] 1 June 1871; p. 3.

• advertisement. Christian Advocate 46 (8 June 1871); p. 184.

• “Twins.” The Eaton Democrat [Eaton, Ohio] 22 June 1871; p. 3.

• “The Chicago Calamity.” Brooklyn Daily Eagle [Brooklyn, New York] 10 Oct 1871; p. 2.

• “The Sufferers.” The Chicago Tribune [Chicago, Illinois] 13 Oct 1871; p. 2.

Geo. P. Rowell & Co.’s American Newspaper Directory. New York: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1872; p. 31. [archive.org]

• “The Magazines, Etc.: The Bright Side.” The Advance 5 (8 Feb 1872); p. 6.)

• The Bright Side and Family Circle. Decatur Weekly Republican [Decatur, Illinois] 8 Feb 1872; p. 5. Also, The Courier [Waterloo, Iowa] 15 Feb 1872; p. 3. Also, Nashville Journal [Nashville, Illinois] 17 Feb 1872; p. 7.

• We have received from Chicago. Fall River Daily Evening News [Fall River, Massachusetts] 9 Feb 1872; p. 2.

• “The Bright Side and Family Circle.” The Highland Weekly News [Hillsboro, Ohio] 2 Jan 1873; p. 3.

• When providing your supply of reading for the year. The Donaldsonville Chief [Donaldsonville, Louisiana] 22 Feb 1873; p. 2.

• “Something About the Religious Press of Chicago.” Chicago Tribune [Chicago, Illinois] 16 March 1873; p. 12.

• “The Bright Side.” The Vermont Gazette [Bennington, Vermont] 5 April 1873; p. 1.

• “Wanted.” Chicago Tribune [Chicago, Illinois] 10 July 1873; p. 7.

• “The Courts: Bankruptcy Items.” Chicago Tribune [Chicago, Illinois] 6 Feb 1874; p. 7.

Zion’s Hope ; 1 July 1869-1972

cover/masthead: 1870

edited by: 1869-1872, Joseph Smith • 1870-1872, Joseph Smith & Mark H. Forscutt • 1900, Mrs. M. Walker • 1917, Ethel I. Skank

published: Plano, Illinois: Herald publishing house, 1869-1872. • Lamoni, Iowa: Herald Publishing House.

frequency: 1869-1872, semimonthly • later, weekly

description: page size, 7″ h x 5″ w

• 1869-1872: price, 50¢/ year

• The Hope was enlarged in 1886: “Zion’s Hope for November 29[, 1886] came out in an enlarged form and illustrated, making it more attractive.” [History; vol 4, p. 668]

• vol. 49 #33 is 13 Aug 1917

• Religious focus: Reorganized Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints

relevant information: In 1869, the publisher requested the names of “nine worthy widows” with children, to whom the Hope would be sent for free in 1870. [Herald 15 Dec 1869]

relevant quotes:

The Saints’ Herald, the denominational paper, explained the need: “Every friend of progress in the church, every lover of the truth, every father, every mother, every brother, every sister, is materially affected by the teaching and training of the children of the household to which each separately belongs. A corner or column of the Herald is insufficient to meet the great want felt in this direction, and to give success to any new enterprise engaged in by us as a people, it is requisite that the object for which we especially strive in that enterprise be worthy and the effort persistent. … The tendency of the age is toward light reading, to counteract the evil growing out of this taste, it is essential that a united public opinion should pronounce against it, and should declare in favor of that which combines the elements for instruction and entertainment. The young mind must be fed. If fed with that which is conducive to a healthy growth, vigorous minds may be expected. If fed with that which does not enrich, there is no growth. Neither can we expect our faith to be correctly understood by the rising generation, unless we take some pains to inculcate its principles by precept, and example. There are some who are fearful of, and object to, any thing sectarian. If then it be desirable for the young, and it can not be found in the current publications of the day, as a progressive people, we must furnish within the reach of all, that which is not liable to the above objection. By adopting the paper plan, we will, in a cheap, interesting, and useful manner, accomplish the end desired. And while it is not intended to take the place of books, it will be, if properly conducted, a valuable auxiliary to such books as the church may ultimately issue, as well as to those now in use by the schools.” [15 June 1869; p. 367-368]

• Pleas for subscribers usually were couched in terms of duty: As church President, editor Joseph Smith declared that it was the duty of followers to subscribe to the Hope; and a later writer went further: “Do the Inspired Translation, Book of Mormon, Doctrine and Covenants, Herald and Zion’s Hope, all contain the word of God? If so, what is our duty as Latter Day Saints? Is there one able-bodied saint that can plead poverty as an excuse for not being in possession of all the above named works. If that has been your plea; go before God, and with an honest heart call him to witness, (if you can), that you have made every sacrifice; and have honestly failed to provide these necessary helps.” [J. L., jr; p. 175]

source of information: Bauer; History; OCLC

available: AASHistPer, series 5

bibliography:

• request for support. The True Latter Day Saints Herald 16 (15 June 1869); pp. 367-368. [google books]

• notice of subscriptions being sold. The True Latter Day Saints Herald 16 (1 July 1869); p. 19.[google books]

• letter from an admirer. The True Latter Day Saints Herald 16 (1 Aug 1869); pp. 86-87 [google books]

• “Our Publications.” The True Latter Day Saints Herald 16 (1 Sept 1869); p. 153. [google books]

• advertisement. The True Latter Day Saints Herald 16 (1 Dec 1869); p. 352. [google books]

• letter from subscriber and offer to send copies to nine widows with children. The True Latter Day Saints Herald 16 (15 Dec 1869); p. 373. [google books]

• advertisement. Concordance and Reference Guide to the Book of Doctrine and Covenants. Plano, Illinois: The True Latter Day Saints Herald, 1870; back cover (cover page 4). [google books]

• plea for subscriptions. The True Latter Day Saints Herald 17 (15 Jan 1870); p. 48. [google books]

• advertisement. The True Latter Day Saints Herald 17 (1 Feb 1870); p. 96. [google books]

• Joseph Smith declares it is the duty of followers to subscribe. The True Latter Day Saints Herald 17 (15 May 1870); p. 316. [google books]

• J. L., jr. “Grace.” The True Latter Day Saints Herald 18 (15 May 1871); p. 175-176. [google books]

• advertisement. The True Latter Day Saints Herald 18 (15 March 1871); p. 192. [google books]

• advertisement. The True Latter Day Saints Herald 18 (1 Oct 1871); p. 607. [google books]

• advertisement. The True Latter Day Saints Herald 19 (15 March 1872); p. 192. [google books]

The History of the Reorganized Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints. Independence, Missouri: Herald, House, 1967; vol 3, 4, & 7.

• Carolyn J. Bauer and Sharon P. Muir. “Visions, Saints and Zion: Children’s Literature of the Mormon Movement.” Phaedrus 7 (Spring/Summer 1980); p. 32.

Der Jugend-Pilger (Youth pilgrim); 1870-1914?

edited by: 1870-1895, Wilhelm Mittendorf • Arndt lists later editors

published: Dayton, Ohio: Publishing House of the United Brethren in Christ Church, 1870-1914.

frequency: 1870-1874, monthly; 1874-1914, semimonthly

description: Religious focus: United Brethren in Christ

• German-language periodical

source of information: Arndt; Fraser

available: AASHistPer, series 5 (1876 issues only)

bibliography:

• “United Brethren Sunday-School Periodicals.” Northwest Expositor [Downs, Kansas] 15 July 1891; p. 8.

• “United Brethren Periodicals.” Central Expositor [Enterprise, Kansas] 15 May 1893; p. 5.

• “Facts and Figures Submitted to Trustees of U. B. Publishing House.” Dayton Daily News [Dayton, Ohio] 26 April 1900; p. 7.

• Karl J. R. Arndt & May E. Olson. German-American Newspapers and Periodicals: 1732-1955. Heidelberg: Quelle & Meyer Publishers, 1961.

• Sybille Fraser. “German Language Children’s and Youth Periodicals in North America: A Checklist.” Phaedrus 6 (Spring 1979); p. 27-31.

The Infants’ Delight (also Infants’ Delight) ; 1870-after Jan 1872

published: Boston, Massachusetts: Lee & Shepard.

frequency: monthly; 1 vol/ year

description: 8 pp.; page size, 8.25″ h • Intended for small children: large font size and several pages printed in four-color

source of information: Lyon; OCLC; AASHistPer

available: AASHistPer, series 5

bibliography:

• Betty Longenecker Lyon. “A History of Children’s Secular Magazines Published in the United States from 1789-1899.” PhD diss. Johns Hopkins, 1942; p. 256.

The Little Watchman ; 1870-1876

edited by: Levi H. Dowling, 1870-1872

• Levi H. Dowling & Knox P. Taylor, 1876

published: Chicago, Illinois: W. W. Dowling, 1870-1872.

• St. Louis, Missouri & Indianapolis, Indiana, 1875.

• Bloomington, Illinois: Leader Company, 1872-1875.

frequency: 1871, semimonthly; 1872, weekly & monthly; 1874, weekly & monthly

description: 1870-1871, 4 pp.

• 1872: weekly, 8 pp.; monthly, 32 pp.; page size, 32″ h x 22″ w; prices: weekly, 50¢/ year; monthly, 75¢/ year

• Circulation, 1872: weekly, 5,000; monthly, 1,000

• Religious focus

relevant quotes:

• One notice calls it “a little paper for little people.” [notice of Morning Watch]

• The Chicago Fire (Nov 1871) destroyed the offices and the subscription books: “The Subscription Books were all destroyed, and so we have no means of ascertaining the status of our accounts with former subscribers, and we are compelled to depend upon them for information, which we trust will be forwarded to us at once. … All persons knowing themselves indebted to the Editor, will confer a favor, that will long be remembered, by remitting the amount at once. Brethren, don’t take advantage in this time of peril.” L. H. Dowling, however, took advantage of the time to revamp the paper (and raise the price). [Dowling]

relevant information:

• Dowling reused the name Little Watchman in 1891, when he purchased and renamed the Christian Sunday School Teacher.

• Levi H. Dowling published The Aquarian Age Gospel of Jesus, the Christ of the Piscean Age—a purported complete life of Christ which includes his formative travels through India and Tibet—in 1908.

source of information: Scott; Rowell; Bodenhamer; Campbell; Holloway; Notice of Morning Watch

available: AASHistPer, series 5 (1876 only)

bibliography:

• W. R. Holloway. Indianapolis. Indianapolis, Indiana: Indianapolis Journal Print, 1870; p. 162. [google books]

• notice. The Christian Standard 5 (3 Dec 1870); p. 389.

• notice of The Morning Watch. The Phrenological Journal and Science of Health 52 (May 1871); p. 366.

• L. H. Dowling. “The Great Chicago Fire and the Little Watchman.” The Christian Standard 6 (9 Dec 1871); p. 389.

Geo. P. Rowell & Co.’s American Newspaper Directory. New York: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1872; p. 31. [archive.org]

• Rowell’s Newspaper Reporter. The Pantagraph [Bloomington, Illinois] 13 Sept 1872; p. 4.

• advertisement. Geo. P. Rowell & Co’s American Newspaper Directory. New York: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1874; p. 451; copy online at UNT Digital Library

• R. A. Campbell. Campbell’s Gazetteer of Missouri, rev. ed. St. Louis, Missouri: 1875; p. 714. [google books]

• Franklin William Scott. Newspapers and Periodicals of Illinois. N.p.: Franklin William Scott, 1910; p. 31, 102

• David J. Bodenhamer and Robert G. Barrows. The Encyclopedia of Indianapolis. Bloomington, Indiana: Indiana University Press, 1994; p. 1182. [google books]

The Pacific Youth ; 1870-1872

edited by: Thomas A. Fisher, 1870 • William C. Forde, 1870-early 1871 • Collins Brothers, 1871

published: San Francisco, California: W. C. Forde & Co.

• San Francisco, California: William C. Forde and Thomas A. Fisher, 1870

• San Francisco, California: Forde and Collins, June 1870; publisher at 634 Sacramento St.

• San Francisco, California: Collins, Forde & Co., May 1871; publisher at 629 Clay.

• San Francisco, California: Collins Bros., 1871; publisher at 631 Sacramento St., June 1871.

frequency: weekly

description: Page size, 13″ h

• 1870: price, 25¢/ year, “city subscribers”; $2.50/ year by mail

• Issued printed in the first six months of 1870: 6,000 [1870 census, schedule 4]

• 1871: 8 pp.; price, $2.50/ year

• 15 June 1871 is new series vol 1 #22

relevant information:

• Forde is listed as a twenty-one-year-old editor in the 1870 population census. [1870 census, schedule 1]

• A serialized story, “Rest at Last,” was published during June 1870.

• The magazine apparently was printed in color. [Elevator 24 June 1870]

relevant quotes:

• About the content: “It will give historical, geographical and humorous sketches; tales, athletic sports, puzzles, etc.” [Elevator 25 Feb 1870]

• About the editor: “A juvenile paper from the far off Pacific slope greets us, and is no doubt wanted in that region. We note that Mr. Thos. A. Fisher, late of Philadelphia, is one of the editorial corps. He was a companion upon our California trip in October last, seeking San Francisco for his future home. Being young and able, we hope his return to his native city may be crowned with a golden harvest. His many friends will be glad to hear of and from him.” [Underwriter]

• An attempt in 1870 to have public schools subscribe to the paper was met with strong opposition from a (possibly rival) editor: “We hope that the application will be denied. It is clearly in violation of the ‘Manual’ to permit any tract or any other kind of publication to be circulated in the schools. Besides, it would be in extreme bad taste to allow it. The pupils have sufficient tawdry now to ‘turn their heads’ and call their attention away from their legitimate duties. Books have been used already in the schools to corrupt and bias the minds of the children. If they need newspaper literature, let their parents provide their homes with a good family newspaper. In the name of common sense, then, we earnestly protest against ‘The Pacific Youth,’ and all kindred sheets from being allowed to circulate in our Public Schools.” [“It Should Not Be Allowed”] An application made in 1871 was denied. [“Board of Education”]

• Forde and J. Clarence Collins formed a publishing company—the Pacific Youth Publishing Co.—which is evident in the 1870 United States census, schedule 4 (Products of Industry), where Pacific Youth is listed as being issued by Collins; the partnership is enshrined in the San Francisco Directory for 1871, with an office at 629 Clay. However, by June 1871, Forde and Collins had acrimoniously dissolved their partnership, with both apparently attempting to keep control of the paper. The Collins brothers inserted a notice in at least one local newspaper that they and they only were responsible for the Youth: “The ‘Pacific Youth’ has removed its office of publication from 629 Clay to 631 Sacramento street. All business, of whatever nature, must be transacted with the COLLINS BROS., no one else being authorized to receive moneys or incur debts on the account of the ‘Pacific Youth,’ Room 18.” [“Removed”]

• Forde, however, resorted to assault and larceny in an attempt to keep control by appropriating subscriptions: “The publishers of the Pacific Youth have had some trouble recently, and a dissolution was the result. Wm. Ford[e] claimed the right of publishing the paper exclusively, but the opposing faction obtained possession of the office and had the paper printed. As Alvin C. Turner was serving it to-day, he was assaulted [by] Forde and John Shea, a fireman, who took from him his subscription book, containing his private accounts of carrying the Youth and other p[a]pers. He swore out a complaint, and Forde and Shea were are [sic] under arrest on charges of assault and larceny Forde claims that Turner had no right to serve the paper without permission of him, Forde.” [“ ‘Pacific Youth’ War.“ 15 June 1871] Forde had the original office, though apparently not the business itself: “In the account of the arrest of Wm. C. Forde, yesterday, it was stated that the opposition to him held possession of the Youth office and types, which statement was made by Mr. Turner, who caused the arrest of Mr. Forde. Mr. Forde claims that he has possession of the office, and that the other parties are issuing his paper from another office without authority.” [“ ‘Pacific Youth’ War.“ 16 June 1871] The charge of assault and battery was dismissed, but the larceny case ($20 had been taken) was continued. Forde seems to have attempted to publish his own periodical for children as a result of the dissolved partnership.

Pacific Youth—now listed as a “literary weekly”—appears in the 1872 San Francisco Directory, edited and published by the Collins Brothers, office at 631 Sacramento. It doesn’t appear in the directory for 1873.

entertaining information:

• At least one other editor of a periodical titled Pacific Youth also had legal problems arising from the publication: “The San Francisco Chronicle of September 8 says: J. H. Lichtenstein, a boy editor, aged perhaps 15, yesterday caused the arrest of H. E. Door, T. H. Kerr and D. E. Vandor, amateur editors still younger, on charge of libel. Lichtenstein publishes a little sheet called the Pacific Youth, and the others utter a paper called the Vindicator and Growler, and they have been calling one another thieves, liars, swindlers and villains, and all that sort of thing, for months past. The parties arrested gave bonds, and the case will be heard in the Police Court this morning.” [“Pen and Scissors”]

split off: Youth’s Gazette (1871)

source of information: OCLC; notices, etc., below

available: A story, “The Butterfly and the Bees,” was reprinted in Youth’s Companion [44 (27 April 1871); p. 134]

bibliography:

• Henry G. Langley, comp. The San Francisco Directory for the Year Commencing December, 1869. San Francisco, California: Henry G. Langley, 1869; pp. 160, 242. [ancestry.com]

L. P. Fisher’s Advertisers’ Guide [for the Pacific Coast]. San Francisco, California: L. P. Fisher, 1870; p. 112. [archive.org]

• “The Pacific Youth.” Philadelphia Underwriter 2 (Feb 1870); p. 47.

• “It Should Not Be Allowed.” The San Francisco Examiner [San Francisco, California] 21 Feb 1870; p. 3.

• “The Pacific Youth.” The Elevator [San Francisco, California] 25 Feb 1870; p. 4.

• 1870 United States census: schedul 1, Inhabitants. Ward 4, San Francisco, San Francisco co., California; p. 212, family 2085. [ancestry.com]

• 1870 United States census: schedule 4, Products of Industry. Ward 3, San Francisco, San Francisco co., California; p. 30, lines 4-5. [ancestry.com]

• notice. The Elevator [San Francisco, California] 24 June 1870; p. 2.

• Henry G. Langley, comp. The San Francisco Directory for the Year Commencing April, 1871. San Francisco, California: Henry G. Langley, 1871; pp. 167, 256, 512. [ancestry.com]

• “Board of Education. Meeting of the Board Last Night.” The San Francisco Examiner [San Francisco, California] 11 Jan 1871; p. 3.

• “The Pacific Youth.” The Owyhee Avalanche [Silver City, Idaho] 20 May 1871; p. 2.

• “Removed.” San Francisco Chronicle [San Francisco, California] 11 June 1871; p. 2.

• “The ‘Pacific Youth’ War.” San Francisco Bulletin 15 June 1871; p. 3.

• “The ‘Pacific Youth’ War.” San Francisco Bulletin 16 June 1871; p. 3.

• “Small Rivals.” San Francisco Chronicle [San Francisco, California] 29 June 1871; p. 3.

• Henry G. Langley, comp. The San Francisco Directory for the Year Commencing March, 1872. San Francisco, California: Henry G. Langley, 1872; pp. 166, 254, 515. [ancestry.com]

• “Pen and Scissors.” Territorial Enterprise [Virginia City, Nevada] 10 Sept 1874; p. 2. See also “Precocious Journalism.” The San Francisco Examiner [San Francisco, California] 8 Sept 1874; p. 3.

• Betty Longenecker Lyon. “A History of Children’s Secular Magazines Published in the United States from 1789-1899.” PhD diss. Johns Hopkins, 1942; p. 246.

The Young Sportsman ; 1870?-1872

edited by: William L. Terhune

published: Portsmouth, New Hampshire: W. L. Terhune, Frank L. Howard, Reed Campbell. • Newark, New Jersey: Terhune, Campbell & Farwell, 1870

frequency: monthly?

description:

• Amateur publication

• Newspaper format; price, 35¢/ year

• April 1872 is vol 3 #3, old series

relevant quotes:

• The paper was intended for both boys and girls: “It is made up of good matter, in good style, and every number is overflowing with rich stories, sketches, poetry, puzzles, &c., for both sexes.” [“Something for the Young Folks”]

• William L. Terhune went on to become assistant editor of another paper in 1873: “Wm. L. Terhune, formerly the most popular amateur in the country as editor of the Young Sportsman, has again entered the ranks as assistant editor of the Young American, Lebanon.” [“Amateuralities”]

relevant information:

• W. L. Terhune also contributed to The Young Sportsman.

source of information: OCLC; pieces below

bibliography:

• “Prospectus!” The Young Sportsman 1 (Jan 1870); p. 8.

• “Something for the Young Folks.” The McArthur Enquirer [McArthur, Ohio] 4 May 1870; p. 3.

• “Amateuralities.” The Acorn [Woodstock, Vermont] 1 Oct 1873; p. 2.

Picture Lesson Paper • The Picture Story Paper ; Jan 1870-1941

edited by: J. H. Vincent, 1870

frequency: monthly

description: 1870-1871: 8 pp.; price, 25¢/ year

• Religious focus: Methodist

relevant information: The first issue was available in early Dec 1869. [“Catechism”]

source of information: Advocate; Herald; Sunday School Worker; Sunday School Journal; Catalog; OCLC

bibliography:

• notice. Christian Advocate 44 (9 Sept 1869); p. 288.

• “A Catechism on the Berean System.” Christian Advocate 44 (25 Nov 1869); p. 376.

• notice. Christian Advocate 46 (23 March 1871); p. 96.

• “Berean Helps.” Zion’s Herald 49 (19 Dec 1872); p. 610.

• “Picture Lesson Paper.” American Sunday School Worker for Parents and Teachers 4 (Feb 1873); p. 45.

• “Change in the Primary Helps.” The Sunday School Journal and Bible Student’s Magazine 52 (Nov 1910); p. 793-794.

Catalog of Copyright Entries, January-December 1941. Washington, District of Columbia: U. S. Government Printing Office, 1942; vol 36; nos. 7645, 18346, 29087, 30127. [google books]

The Young Sportsman ; Jan 1870-?

cover/masthead: 1870

edited by: Edwin Farwell

published: Boston, Massachusetts; publisher at Box 536, 1870

frequency: monthly

description: 8 pp.; page size, 11.75″ h; prices: 1 copy, .50¢/ year; 5 copies, $2/ year; 10 copies, $3.75/ year; 15 copies, $5.50/ year; 20 copies, $7/ year

relevant quotes:

• The focus of the paper was, quite naturally, on sports: “We come before you, dear readers, without the least hesitation, for knowing this to be the only paper for the youth of America devoted entirely to boys’ sports, we expect your firm support and hearty coöperation in placing us at the very head of juvenile literature. … It is our intention to publish nothing but the very best, and our numerous contributors will doubtless support us on this important point. Sporting news will be faithfully placed before our readers, and these, together with sparkling stories and amusing anecdotes, will never, for a moment, allow your interest in our sheet to subside.” “To One and All.” 1 (Jan 1870); p. 4]

• The Sportsman was extremely focused: “Since our paper is devoted to HUNTING, SKATING, BASE-BALL, PRINTING, FISHING, BOATING, CRICKET, ETC., ETC., articles on other subject will not be admitted to our columns. Original Stories on the above subjects will be thankfully received, and, if suitable, will be at once published. We shall have a Puzzle Department under the name of OUR GAME-BAG, where an able corps of young folks will tangle the threads. Enigmas, Puzzles, etc., will be thankfully received, and have a place in this interesting department.” [“Prospectus!” 1 (Jan 1870); p. 8]

source of information: AAS catalog; AASHistPer, series 5

available: AASHistPer, series 5

bibliography:

• notice. Public Ledger [Memphis, Tennessee] 11 Jan 1870; p. 4.

• “Editorial Correspondence.” Oliver Optic’s Magazine: Our Boys and Girls 8 (2 July 1870); p. 432.

The Little Corporal’s School Festival ; Jan-July 1870 • The School Festival (also National School Festival) ; Oct 1870-1874

cover/masthead: 1870-1871

edited by: April 1871-March 1873, Alfred L. Sewell; Mary B. C. Slade

• April 1873-, T. A. Hutchins; Mary B. C. Slade

published: Chicago, Illinois: Sewell & Miller, Jan 1870-Jan 1871; publisher at 9 Custom House Place, 1870-1871.

• Chicago, Illinois: Alfred L. Sewell & Co., 1871-1872; publisher at 80 Washington St., 1871.

• East Boston, Massachusetts: N.p., April 1873-?

frequency: quarterly: Jan, April, July, Oct

description: 36 pp.; page size, 7.75″ h

• Prices: 1870-1872, 1 copy, 15¢ 50¢/ year. 1873, 1 copy, 75¢/ year

• Circulation: 1872, 10,000

relevant information: The first issue (Jan 1870) was published in Nov 1869; issue 2 was published around 1 Feb 1870: “We have issued our first, January, number two months in advance, so that you may have plenty of time to give us a good list [ie, find other subscribers] before the year begins. Our nest number will be issued about the first of February.” [“Our Magazine.” 1 (Jan 1870); p. 32]

• Many pieces in the Festival are intended for adults managing the exhibitions, but issues contain pages of dialogues, speeches, and poems to be recited by children of all ages.

relevant quotes:

• Announcement: “This beautiful magazine, devoted entirely to School Exhibitions, Dialogues, Tableaux, Recitations, etc., is ready for January. All are delighted with it. It is just what is needed by every teacher and every scholar.” [Little Corporal]

• Later advertisements described the contents more fully: “ ‘THE SCHOOL FESTIVAL’ is a beautiful original quarterly Magazine, devoted to new, sparkling Dialogues, Recitations, Concert, Motion, and other Exercises for Sunday School and Day School Exhibitions, Concerts, ‘Public Days,’ &c. … Needed by all teachers and pupils.” [Golden Hours]

• The Festival was intended to bring fresh material to school exhibitions: “Books have been published, giving both original and selected dialogues, orations, and recitations. Other books have been devoted to tableaux and charades; but the complaint is that even the best of these books soon become stale. Juvenile and other literary periodicals have given occasional and disconnected attention to one or more of these subjects, just as many newspapers and magazines for grown folks have, for many years, had their small, half-worked corners called ‘The Children’s Department.’ But as these children’s ‘corners’ have only awakened an appetite for something better, … so it seems to us the time has come when the little ‘corners’ given in the juvenile magazines to school entertainments, festivals, tableaux, etc., and to materials out of which to make them, cannot supply the thirst for all these things. A regularly organized effort is needed to raise the standard of our literary entertainments, in both the weekday and Sunday school, not only by furnishing a continuous supply of superior original dialogues, recitations, tableaux, and other matters of interest for the programme, but by calling out practical suggestions from the best minds in the land as to the most approved methods of managing the different classes of entertainment, as well as the best way of handling both the actors and their performances. Some teachers, and pupils, too, are adepts in this beautiful and interesting science, and are able to invent and compose an almost endless variety of new and brilliant performances; but the great mass have not time, even if they have talent, for such things, and are glad to avail themselves of all the helps on which they can lay their hands. Our effort will be to secure the aid of those who have talent and time to enrich our pages for the benefit of those who are less favored. … Beginning as a quarterly, if we find it expedient to issue mroe frequently we will determine to do that hereafter.” [“Our Object.” 1 (Jan 1870); p. 1]

• Like The Little Corporal, the School Festival endured some setbacks due to the Chicago Fire of 1871, including the destruction of not only the Oct 1871 issue, but the magazine’s subscription list: “Though burned out by the Great Fire, and our October Number being destroyed before being mailed, The Festival is going ahead,—the October Number has been reprinted, and the destroyed plates of the back numbers are to be replaced, so that we can furnish back numbers as usual. As our subscription list was burned, subscribers will please write and claim what is due them and send on their subscr[i]ption for the next year.” [advertisement. The Little Corporal 13 (Dec 1871): inside front cover (cover page 2)] The Philadelpia Inquirer received its copy in late Nov.

• The Brooklyn Daily Times took a chance to comment on the popularity of school exhibitions: “[The Festival] is a well arranged and carefully edited little magazine, and as the outgrowth of a peculiarity of American society, it is worthy of more than a passing notice. Taking the form of one of the lesser magazines, its pages are devoted to the publication of dialogues, recitations, and the details of grouping, costume, &c., for allegorical and historical tableaux. An indispensable publication in this age of school exhitions, Christmas entertainments and all the other excuses so eagerly seized by fond parents and ambitious pedagogues for displaying the ability or impudence of their children. We regard everything calculated to injure the ingenious modesty of children as a grave mistake, and we cannot therefore rejoice at the multiplication and the growing popularity of a system which we regard as essentially mischievous, but this much we can say that this magazine contans nothing to offend the taste of the most scrupulous, on the contrary, the selections it offers seem made in the interests of the temperance and anti-tobacco movements. It is worth the attention of teachers and parents.”

source of information: notices, etc., below; AASHistPer, series 5; OCLC; NUC

available: AASHistPer, series 5

bibliography:

• “The Little Corporal’s School Festival.” Detroit Free Press [Detroit, Michigan] 25 Nov 1869; p. 1.

• “The School Festival.” Corvallis Gazette-Times [Corvallis, Oregon] 25 Dec 1869; p. 2.

• “The School Festival.” The Little Corporal. 10 (Jan 1870); p. 12.

• “Magazines for the Young.” Massachusetts Teacher and Journal of Home and School Education 23 (Jan 1870); p. 38.

• “Book Notices.” Massachusetts Teacher and Journal of Home and School Education 24 (March 1871); p. 114.

• advertisement. Golden Hours, 3 (June 1871); p. 2, advertising section.

• “The National School Festival.” The Representative [Fox Lake, Wisconsin] 7 July 1871; p. 2.

• “Book Notices.” Massachusetts Teacher and Journal of Home and School Education 24 (Sept 1871); p. 342.

• “The Sufferers.” The Chicago Tribune [Chicago, Illinois] 13 Oct 1871; p. 2.

• “Periodicals, &c.: The National School Festival.” The Philadelphia Inquirer [Philadelphia, Pennsylvania] 1 Dec 1871; p. 7.

• advertisement. The Little Corporal 13 (Dec 1871): inside front cover (cover page 2)

• notice. The American Israelite [Cincinnati, Ohio] 25 April 1872; p. P8.

• notice. Oneida Circular 9 (29 April 1872); p. 140.

Geo. P. Rowell & Co.’s American Newspaper Directory. New York: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1872; p. 32. [archive.org]

• “Literary: The National School Festival for January.” Brooklyn Daily Times [Brooklyn, New York] 10 Jan 1872; p. 2.

• notice. Fall River daily Evening News [Fall River, Massachusetts] 1 April 1873; p. 2.

Work and Play ; Jan 1870-March 1872

edited by: Mrs. Herbert L. Bridgman, “a lady well known and friended in Springfield” [“Kindergarten Appliances”]

published: Boston, Massachusetts: Milton Bradley & Co.

frequency: monthly; 1 vol/ year

description: 16 pp.; quarto; page size, 11.25″ h x 8″ w; price, $1/ year

• Circulation: 1870, 3,000

relevant information:

• Some contents of the Oct 1871 issue were printed in the Hartford Courant [Hartford, Connecticut; 20 Sept 1871; p. 2.].

relevant quotes:

• One prepublication advertisement promised that the magazine “professes to be specially devoted to the professions and occupations of home.” [advertisement. New England Farmer 18 Dec 1869] Another got more specific, calling it “a monthly journal of Instruction and Amusement for the young” and explaining that “[i]t features[ ]will be stories, sketches, occupations and amusements for the young.” [advertisement. The Star and Enterprise] A later article notes that it is “racy, bright full of puzzles”. [“A Swindler Photographed”]

• One notice praised the magazine for “the success of this new Magazine in a field original to itself, and in which instruction seems to be the main object, rather than hobgoblin stories and exciting accounts of impossible adventure.” [notice. The Atchison Daily Champion]

• The magazine’s wide variety is described in one creatively fonted advertisement: “The occupation, amusements, and instruction of the whole family a speciality. New Games, Home Amusements, Instructive Sketches, Drawing Lessons, splendid Puzzles and beautiful Oil Chromos are prominent features in this original Magazine.” [“Work and Play.” Our Venture]

• Information about a criminal was included in or with the Aug 1870 issue: “ ‘Work and Play’ … furnishes, with the August number, two photographs and a description of the religious impostor who has so lately victimized certain benevolent people in Saratoga, Springfield and elsewhere. He is known as F. Whitcomb, or Wellington Wellman, or whatever name he cho[o]ses to give, and seems to have had a successful career as a swindler. Any police officer or other person who desires to lay by the ‘Reverend’ scamp’s physiognomy for future reference, can get it by sending a postage stamp to the publishers of ‘Work and Play.’ We may as well add here that this little monthly is racy, bright and full of puzzles and everyway worth the $1.00 it costs.” [“A Swindler Photographed”]

absorbed by: The Little Corporal ; July 1865-April 1875

relevant quote: The merger with the Corporal was announced in that magazine’s April 1872 issue: “By an arrangement made with the publishers, Milton Bradley & Co., Springfield, Mass., the publication of [Work and Play] will hereafter be discontinued, and its subscribers will be supplied with the Little Corporal for the unexpired term of their subscription. … Work and Play was established with the express purpose of ‘increasing the interest in rational and instructive home amusements and occupations throughout the country.’ The work accomplished and the reputation achieved by this magazine in the peculiar field to which it was devoted, has been very great, and much good has resulted. Considering the character and excellence of Work and Play, the Corporal thinks he has obtained a distinguished recruit—and he welcomes all the friends of that magazine to the ranks of his great army with the assurance that he will do everything in his power to make it profitable and pleasant to them. We are glad to announce in this connection that Uncle Raphael will continue his excellent articles on Drawing, which had become so popular in Work and Play. The first of these articles will appear in the next number of the Corporal. Now for a vigorous campaign!” [Corporal 14 (April 1872); p. 154] Beginning with the May 1872 issue, the puzzle column in the Corporal, which had been called “Private Queer’s Knapsack,” was retitled “Work and Play.”

source of information: Little Corporal; OCLC; Lyon; Men Who Advertise

available:

• Pieces from the magazine were collected into The Work and Play Annual of Home Amusements and Social Sports, a 60-page paperbound book “with colored paper cover, and beautifully engraved plate for outside, containing about one hundred and fifty games, acting charades, illustrated rebuses, geometrical puzzles, &c., &c.” [advertisement of The Work and Play Annual]

• “Life on Mt. Washington,” one of a series of letters from men spending the winter on Mt. Washington (Agiocochook), New Hampshire, was reprinted in the Hartford Courant [Hartford, Connecticut; 7 March 1872; p. 1].

bibliography:

• advertisement. The Star and Enterprise [Newville, Pennsylvania] 11 Dec 1869; p. 2.

• notice. New England Farmer [Boston, Massachusetts] 18 Dec 1869; p. 2.

• “A Swindler Photographed.” The Burlington Free Press [Burlington, Vermont] 20 July 1870; p. 3.

• notice. The Atchison Daily Cahmpion [Athison, Kansas] 21 July 1870; p. 4.

• “Another Attraction for the Little Folks.” The Daily Kansas Tribune [Lawrence, Kansas] 22 July 1870; p. 3.

• notice. Wood County Reporter [Grand Rapids, Wisconsin] 25 May 1871; p. 3.

• notice of Oct issue. Hartford Courant [Hartford, Connecticut] 20 Sept 1871; p. 2.

• “Work and Play.” Our Venture [Brattleboro, Vermont] 1 Oct 1871; p. 8.

• notice. The American Israelite [Cincinnati, Ohio] 27 Oct 1871; p. P7.

• advertisement of The Work and Play Annual of Home Amusements and Social Sports. The Atchison Daily Champion [Atchison, Kansas] 20 Jan 1872; p. 4.

• notice of Feb issue. Holmes County Republican [Millersburg, Ohio] 1 Feb 1872; p. 3.

• “Kindergarten Appliances.” Quad-City Times [Davenport, Iowa] 31 March 1873; p. 4.

The Men Who Advertise. New York: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1870; p. 669. [google books]

• “Newspapers and Magazines: Work and Play.” The Girard Press [Girard, Kansas] 4 Jan 1872; p. 2.

• Editorial announcement. The Little Corporal, 14 (April 1872); p. 154.

• Betty Longenecker Lyon. “A History of Children’s Secular Magazines Published in the United States from 1789-1899.” PhD diss. Johns Hopkins, 1942; pp. 245, 279, 308-312.

The Pious Youth ; Jan 1870-Dec 1871

cover/masthead: 1870

edited by: H. R. Holsinger

published: Tyrone, Pennsylvania: H. R. Holsinger.

• Dale City, Pennsylvania: H. R. Holsinger, Oct-Nov 1871.

frequency: monthly; 1 vol/ year

description: 1870, 16 pp.; page size, 10.5″ h. Price, $1/ year

• 1871, 32 pp.; page size, 8.5″ h; price, $1

• Circulation: 1870, 1,000; 1871, 1,500

• Religious focus: Church of the Brethren

source of information: AAS catalog; OCLC

available: AASHistPer, series 5

bibliography:

• A new paper. Bedford Gazette [Bedford, Pennsylvania] 3 Dec 1869; p. 3.

The Men Who Advertise. New York: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1870; p. 739. [google books]

• “The Pious Youth.” The Bedford Inquirer [Bedford, Pennsylvania] 14 Jan 1870; p. 3.

• “The Pious Youth.” Christian Family Companion 6 (7 June 1870); p. 36.

• “A Word for the Pious Youth.” Christian Family Companion 6 (13 Dec 1870); p. 778.

Geo. P. Rowell & Co.’s American Newspaper Directory. New York: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1872; p. 152. [archive.org]

Our Leisure Moments ; Feb-Dec 1870

edited by: Albert C. Ives; Frederick Samuel Dellenbaugh

published: Buffalo, New York

frequency: monthly

description: Octavo • Amateur publication

source of information: OCLC

bibliography:

• Betty Longenecker Lyon. “A History of Children’s Secular Magazines Published in the United States from 1789-1899.” PhD diss. Johns Hopkins, 1942; pp. 253-254.

American Boy’s Magazine (also Philadelphia Monthly) ; June 1870-May 1872

published: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

frequency: monthly

description: Vol 1-2 #6 (1870-Feb 1872) as Philadelphia Monthly

source of information: NUC

The Children’s Argus ; June-after Nov 1870

edited by: Rebekah Black Shunk; editor at Lock Box 18, Easton, Pennsylvania

published: Easton, Pennsylvania: office of the Easton Argus; publisher at 147 Northampton St.

frequency: monthly

• listed as weekly in the Advertiser’s Hand-Book

description: Prices: 1 copy, 75¢/ year; 10 copies, $5/ year

relevant information: Shunk was the wife of James F. Shunk, editor of the Easton Weekly Argus.

• A “handsome extra Christmas number of the Child’s paper” was promised. [“The Child’s Argus.” Valley Spirit]

relevant quote: From a notice: “It will be devoted to the amusement and instruction of the young. Its pages will be soiled by no surreptitious politics nor by the disguised dogmas of any sect. It will be illustrated handsomely, and while the style and subjects of its articles will be simple and plain, it will not imitate some of the periodicals of this day by proceeding on the assumption that the young are all idiots.” [in “The Children’s Argus.” Valley Spirit]

source of information: notices, etc., below

available: The Patriot reprinted “A Good ‘Hand of Write,’ ” by R. B. S. (Rebekah Black Shunk) [23 Nov 1870; p. 1]

bibliography:

• “A New Child’s Paper.” Intelligencer Journal [Lancaster, Pennsylvania] 28 May 1870; p. 3.

• notice: “State News.” Patriot [Harrisburg, Pennsylvania] 17 June 1870; p. 1.

• “The Children’s Argus.” Valley Spirit [Chambersburg, Pennsylvania] 6 July 1870; p. 2.

• “Book Notices: The Children’s Argus.” Patriot [Harrisburg, Pennsylvania] 7 July 1870; p. 2.

• “Literary Department.” Southern Farm and Home 1 (Aug 1870); p. 377.

• notice of Aug issue: “State News.” Patriot [Harrisburg, Pennsylvania] 6 Aug 1870; p. 1.

The Advertiser’s Hand-Book. New York, New York: S. M. Pettengill & Co., 1870; p. 45.

The Young Catholic ; Oct 1870-after July 1876

cover/masthead: 1871-1876

edited by: I. T. Hecker

published: New York, New York: Catholic Publication Society.

frequency: monthly

description: 8 pp.; page size, 13.75″ h; prices: 5 copies, $2/ year; 15 copies, $5/ year; 500 copies, $125/ year

• Circulation: 1872, 50,000

source of information: AAS catalog; OCLC; AASHistPer

available: AASHistPer, series 5

bibliography:

Geo. P. Rowell & Co.’s American Newspaper Directory. New York: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1872; p. 129. [archive.org]

• “Books Published by the Catholic Publication Society.” The Morning Star and Catholic Messenger [New Orleans, Louisiana] 27 Sept 1874; p. 7.

• “Books Published by the Catholic Publication Society.” The Morning Star and Catholic Messenger [New Orleans, Louisiana] 14 Feb 1875; p. 7.

Young Folks’ Rural ; Nov 1870-1874 • Young Folks’ Monthly ; 1875-1880 • Young Folks’ Rural ; 1880-1883 (also, Young Folks’ Rural Monthly)

cover/masthead: 1872

edited by: H[oratio] N. F. Lewis, 1870-1880. 1872-1875, publisher at 407 West Madison St.

• Milton George, 1876-1880

published: Chicago, Illinois: H. N. F. Lewis, 1870-1872.

• Chicago, Illinois: Milton George, 1876-1880. Also as Chicago, Illinois: The Western Rural.

• Chicago, Illinois: J. D. Tallmadge & E. B. Tallmadge, 1881.

frequency: monthly

description: 1870, 8 pp.; price $1/ year, “The first 500 subscribers are to be credited for two years.” [“For Young Men and Young Women”]

• Sept 1871, 8 pp.; price $1/ year, “and free for remainder of this year to new subscribers for 1872.” [“The Young Folks’ Rural for September”]

• 1872-1873, 16 pp.; page size, 17.75″ h; price, $1.50/ year

• 1874-1875, 32 pp.; page size, 15.25″ h; price $1.50/ year

• 1876, 32 pp., “with tinted cover”

• 1876-1880, price $1/ year

• Sept 1872 is vol 3 #1 (whole #22)

relevant information:

• H. N. F. Lewis edited the Western Rural, for adults.

Young Folks’ offered “cash prizes” for “best ‘compositions’ ”—presumably, from its subscribers. [advertisement. Southern Planter and Farmer]

• The Rural was the answer to an enigma published in the Tunkhannock Republican in 1871.

• Lewis’s career as a publisher was more colorful than most, with him being sued for libel by the Union Furnishing Company (which folded before the lawsuit could go forward) and with Lewis arranging some complex financial maneuvers that ended with him arrested and bankrupted, and the Young Folks’ Monthly in the hands of a new publisher. (See “Legal activities” listed below.)

relevant quotes:

• The magazine was “designed to Cultivate a Taste for Rural-Life among the Young People of both Country and City.” [advertisement. Christian Union]

• One editor describes the magazine as a boys’ magazine: “It was full time that country boys had a better paper than are most that are published for them.” [“Book Notices, &c.”] A notice four years later asserts that “[t]here is everything, in fact, to interest the boy, and over his shoulder his little sister. Then, there are pictures of dogs and horses and things, little receipts for mamma, and scraps which the boy will perhaps remember and think of when he comes to be a man.” [“Young Folk’s [sic] Monthly”]

• A description: “An interesting monthly of sixteen pages and 64 columns. The number before us contains numerous articles on various topics, such as appear to be well adapted not only for the amusement, but likewise for the instruction, of the young.” [notice. American Journal of Pharmacy] Many of Lewis’s advertisements tout the total number of columns of print for each issue.

• While the Rural was a victim of the Chicago Fire, Lewis vowed to publish again: “Although the presses and all the mater[i]al used by the Western Rural and Young Folks’ Rural were entirely destroyed in the great Chicago Fire, … our subscription lists were rescued, and … within one month from the Fire we intend to be out again in old form, style, &c. … New yearly subscribers, for either paper, will receive the whole of 1872 and the reaminder of this year, free, after the resumption.” [“The Western Rural”]

• Some editors were less than impressed by Lewis’s suggested text of notices: “A copy of the Young Folks Rural was received at this office last week, accompanied by a cooked up notice for our insertion, which same we inserted in the fire, as we claim a right to do, on occasion.” (But the editor went on to admire the paper, in detail.) [“A copy of the Young Folks Rural”]

• Lewis asserted that the Rural was “used as a textbook in thousands of schools last season, for reading exercises and as a source for procuring dialogues and matter for declamation and recitation.” [“Opening of Schools”]

absorbed by: Young Folks’ Rural, ed. J. D. Tallmadge [“Milton George”]

source of information: notices, etc., below; Lyon; Fleming; OCLC; AAS

available: AASHistPer, series 5

bibliography:

• “For Young Men and Young Women.” The Atchison Daily Champion [Atchison, Kansas] 9 Aug 1870; p. 4.

• advertisement. Christian Union 19 Nov 1870; p. 2.

• “Young Folks’ Rural.” The Leavenworth Times [Leavenworth, Kansas] 4 Dec 1870; p. 2.

• “The first number.” The Highland Weekly News [Hillsboro, Ohio] 8 Dec 1870; p. 2.

• advertisement. Western Home Journal [Lawrence, Kansas] 22 Dec 1870; p. 3.

• “Book Notices, &c.” Southern Planter and Farmer 5 (Jan 1871); p. 62.

• advertisement. Christian Union 4 Jan 1871; p. 3.

• advertisement for the St. Cloud Journal. The St. Cloud Journal [St. Cloud, Minnesota] 2 Feb 1871; p. 2.

• “Enigma.” Tunkhannock Republican [Tunkhannock, Pennsylvania] 15 Feb 1871; p. 1. answer from Ella Terry. 8 March 1871; p. 1.

• “The Young Folks’ Rural for September.” The Ottawa Free Trader [Ottawa, Illinois] 16 Sept 1871; p. 1.

• “The Sufferers.” The Chicago Tribune [Chicago, Illinois] 13 Oct 1871; p. 2.

• “The Western Rural.” Carlisle Weekly Herald [Carlisle, Pennsylvania] 26 Oct 1871; p. 2.

• “The Young Folks’ Rural is a novelty.” Steuben Republican [Angola, Indiana] 18 Sept 1872; p. 3.

• advertisement. Southern Planter and Farmer Oct 1872; p. 9.

• notice. American Journal of Pharmacy. Oct 1872; p. 480.

• “The Young Folks’ Rural has been enlarged.” The Thibodaux Sentinal [Thibodaux, Louisiana] 5 Oct 1872; p. 2.

• “A copy of the Young Folks Rural.” The Superior Times [Superior, Wisconsin] 12 Oct 1872; p. 4.

• advertisement. Southern Planter and Farmer Dec 1872; p. 9.

Geo. P. Rowell & Co.’s American Newspaper Directory. New York: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1872; p. 32. [archive.org]

• “The Stage.” The Iola Register [Iola, Kansas] 25 Oct 1873; p. 2.

• “An Enterprising Western Publisher.” Atchison Champion [Atchison, Kansas] 22 Aug 1874; p. 4.

• “Opening of Schools.” Doniphan County Republican [Troy, Kansas] 28 Aug 1874; p. 3.

• “Young Folks’ Monthly.” The Representative [Fox Lake, Wisconsin] 20 Nov 1874; p. 4.

• “Young Folks’ Monthly.” Oskaloosa Sickle [Oskaloosa, Kansas] 20 Feb 1875; p. 5.

• “Young Folk’s [sic] Monthly.” The Inter Ocean [Chicago, Illinois] 26 June 1875; p. 2.

• Legal activities: “Collapse of the Union Furnishing Co.” Holmes County Republican [Millersburg, Ohio] 19 March 1872; p. 3. • “H. N. F. Lewis Capiased.” The Inter Ocean [Chicago, Illinois] 1 Feb 1876; p. 2. • “The Western Rural.” Chicago Tribune [Chicago, Illinois] 1 Feb 1876; p. 2. • “H. N. F. Lewis.” Chicago Tribune [Chicago, Illinois] 13 Feb 1876; p. 16. • “H. N. F. Lewis Again.” Chicago Tribune [Chicago, Illinois] 21 Feb 1876; p. 3. • “On Trial.” Chicago Tribune [Chicago, Illinois] 22 Feb 1876; p. 3. • “The Court Record: Before Judge Blodgett.” The Inter Ocean [Chicago, Illinois] 20 Sept 1876; p. 3.

• advertisement for The Young Folks’ Monthly. Ford County Blade [Paxton, Illinois] 28 Oct 1876; p. 7.

• “The Western Rural.” The Frankfort Bee [Frankfort, Kansas] 11 Nov 1876; p. 2.

• “Milton George.” The Garnett Republican-Plaindealer [Garnette, Kansas] 9 April 1880; p. 2.

• Herbert E. Fleming. Magazines of a Market-Metropolis. PhD diss. University of Chicago, 1906; p. 406-407. [google books]

• Betty Longenecker Lyon. “A History of Children’s Secular Magazines Published in the United States from 1789-1899.” PhD diss. Johns Hopkins, 1942; p. 252.

The Young Pilot • Young Pilot and Little Men ; Nov 1870-Sept 1871

edited by: 1871, Franklin H. Tinker

published: Chicago, Illinois: Young Pilot Publishing Company, 1870-1871. Chicago, Illinois: Franklin H. Tinker, 1871; publisher at 6 & 7 Farwell Hall.

frequency: monthly

description: 32 pp.; price, $1/ year. In June 1871, new subscribers would receive 7 issues for 50¢. [Ohio Farmer]

relevant information:

• The cover of the first issue states that it is Dec 1870.

• Contents of the Feb 1871 issue are listed in The St. Cloud Journal and Every Saturday. Contents of the July 1871 issue are described by the Detroit Free Press.

• The Pilot probably ended because of the Chicago Fire; it’s listed as one of the magazines burned out. [Sheahan] Tinker is included on a list of the “Lecturers, Readers, and Singers, Sufferers by the Great Fire” for which the American Literary Bureau was seeking engagements—along with Robert Collyer and Robert Laird Collier, writers for the Pilot. [“To Lecture Committees and Owners of Halls”]

• An amateur paper by this name was published in New Orleans, Louisiana, by J. F. Hansell in 1874. [“Amateur Publications.” Oliver Optic’s Magazine 15 (Jan 1874); p. 77.]

relevant quotes:

• Much was promised: “The Young Pilot. THIS IS THE TITLE OF A NEW MONTHLY MAGAZINE, for the Youth, … supported by the ablest literary talent—William Everett, Thos. Powell, Wirt Sikes, Horatio Algier, [sic] Jr., Willy Wisp, and a host of other well-known writers.” [Chicago Tribune 22 Oct 1870]

• The Brooklyn Daily Eagle was a bit caustic: “Chicago distinctly announces that this magazine is for ‘young people in their teens.’ It is an ambitious attempt of an ambitious country town to make a publication for those who have attained the years of indiscretion. As in all her other aspirations after culture, so in this, Chicago, has to reach out beyond herself. Equally, like all her other outreachings, so in this instance, Chicago feels in the wrong direction—extending her fingers to Boston, and pulling thence to the columns of the Pilot, Mr. Wm. Everett and Charles Eliot Norton. Chicago is peculiar; Boston is peculiar; but Boston and Chicago as a combination, stun the imagination, and sicken all those who love their country. The single result of this double effort is a very yellow covered magazine of thirty-one reading pages. Mr. Everett does the serial ([“My Uncle’s Watch”—on tick and in pawn), Robert Laird Collier, who, it is due to the other Robert Collyer to say, bears no relation or resemblance to him, does the didactic, ‘books and reading;” Mr. Edgar Fawcett, one of those gentlemen who seem to have a pen in every magazine’s inkstand, does the poetry, ‘before parting’; O! Augusta Cheney, a possible relation of the recalcitrant rector of Chicago, or of the transcendental Elizabeth A., of Boston, does the virtues, her article being entitled ‘true courage’—the kind required to live, and most of all, to marry, in the Lake City; and Mr. Charles Eliot Norton does the imaginative memory, his paper being called ‘Reminiscences of a Young Engineer,’ peculiarly appropriate, considering the fact that Mr. Norton is neither young nor an engineer. With Mr. Everett’s serial, ‘My Uncle’s Watch,’ it would be unfair to tamper. That watch is entitled to run itself down, always provided it does not wind the Young Pilot up before it strikes the hour. Mr. Everett writes with that exact adaptation to young minds which practised literary habit, conserved by common sense, and inspired by a nature in sympathy with children and their sports, effects. Robert Laird Collier (with an i), to a mind not steeped in the Eleusinian mysteries of Illinois, seems to labor with severe stiffness to be elaborately easy. [Note: a long extract from Collier’s piece is followed by an equally long, sarcastic dissection of it.] The other articles in the Young Pilot, so called because Chicago is on a lake, which the lake couldn’t help, and thinks that a long-shore schooner is more imposing than the Royal George or the Great Eastern, do not call for especial notice. Miss Cheney’s ‘True Courage’ is all about another good boy who didn’t care if bad boys did accuse him ‘of being tied to a sister’s apron strings’ and who wouldn’t smoke. Just as if being tied to a sister’s (somebody else’s sister’s) apron strings wasn’t the height of happiness. The story ends early in the career of the boy. He undoubtedly recovered from his squeamishness, and in time learned to smoke in a manly and enthusiastic manner. Mr. Fawcett’s verses are in that sorrowful strain which savors of emotion and indigestion. … Give us open, cheery verses Mr. Fawcett, or none. As a mourner you are not a success. The Pilot is well printed and its subscription price is one dollar a year.” [3 Feb 1871] The Times Union didn’t agree with the Eagle about Fawcett’s poem, calling it “a poem of rare beauty” and quoting part, commenting that “[i]f this is not poetry, we profess not to know what constitutes poetry.” [1 Feb 1871]

• Edited by Franklin H. Tinker, the magazine was still for “young people in their teens”: “Wide awake, instructive and entertaining, the Young Pilot yet keeps its motto, ‘Learning is the Safeguard of Youth,’ ever in view, and furnishes, in addition to Interesting Sketches, Lovely Stories, Charming Poetry, etc., monthly, practically written articles on popular subjects.” [advertisement. Wisconsin State Journal 15 Aug 1871]

source of information: notices, etc., below; WorldCat; Sheahan; Scott

available: Part of “Before Parting,” by Edgar Fawcett, was reprinted in the Times Union [1 Feb 1871]

bibliography:

• advertisement. Chicago Tribune [Chicago, Illinois] 22 Oct 1870; p. 1.

• We are in receipt of the initital [sic] No. Urbana Union [Urbana, Ohio] 23 Nov 1870; p. 3.

• notice. Massachusetts Ploughman and New England Journal of Agriculture 30 (26 Nov 1870); p. 2.

• “The Young Pilot.” The Leavenworth Times [Leavenworth, Kansas] 27 Nov 1870; p. 2.

• notice. American Literary Gazette and Publishers’s Circular Dec 1870; p. 25.

• “Young Pilot for the Youth of America.” Green Bay Weekly Gazette [Green Bay, Wisconsin] 3 Dec 1870; p. 3.

• advertisement of Jan issue. Chicago Tribune [Chicago, Illinois] 22 Dec 1870; p. 1.

• The January number. The St. Cloud Journal [St. Cloud, Minnesota] 29 Dec 1870; p. 3.

• “Our Book Table.” The Leavenworth Times [Leavenworth, Kansas] 29 Dec 1870; p. 2.

• “Young Pilot.” Atchison Daily Patriot [Atchison, Kansas] 30 Dec 1870; p. 4.

• notice. American Literary Gazette and Publishers’s Circular 16 (Jan 1871); p. 69.

• “Young Pilot.” Atchison Daily Patriot [Atchison, Kansas] 28 Jan 1871; p. 4.

• “The Young Pilot.” Times Union [Brooklyn, New York] 1 Feb 1871; p. 1.

• advertisement for the St. Cloud Journal. The St. Cloud Journal [St. Cloud, Minnesota] 2 Feb 1871; p. 2.

• “Literary Notices.” The St. Cloud Journal [St. Cloud, Minnesota] 2 Feb 1871); p. 2.

• “The Young Pilot.” The Brooklyn Daily Eagle [Brooklyn, New York] 3 Feb 1871; p. 1.

• “Our New Contributor’s Column.” Ashtabula Weekly Telegraph [Ashtabula, Ohio] 11 Feb 1871; p. 3.

• notice. Every Saturday 2 (25 Feb 1871); p. 187.

• “The Young Pilot.” The San Francisco Examiner [San Francisco, California] 10 March 1871; p. 3.

• The Young Pilot for March. The Ottawa Free Trader [Ottawa, Illinois] 11 March 1871; p. 6.

• notice. Southern Planter and Farmer 5 (April 1871); p. 243.

• notice. Maine Farmer 39 (10 June 1871); p. 2.

• “Young Pilot.” Ohio Farmer 20 (24 June 1871); p. 393.

• notice. Detroit Free Press [Detroit, Michigan] 7 July 1871; p. 3.

• advertisement. Wisconsin State Journal [Madison, Wisconsin] 15 Aug 1871; p. 1.

• “The Young Pilot.” Mower County Transcript [Lansing, Minnesota] 17 Aug 1871; p. 4.

• H. R. F. “In and About Chicago.” Wisconsin State Journal [Madison, Wisconsin] 28 Aug 1871; p. 2.

• The Young Pilot. South-Eastern Independent [McConnelsville, Ohio] 15 Sept 1871; p. 4.

• “The Sufferers.” The Chicago Tribune [Chicago, Illinois] 13 Oct 1871; p. 2.

• “To Lecture Committees and Owners of Halls.” Chicago Tribune [Chicago, Illinois] 20 Oct 1871; p. 4.

• James W. Sheahan and George P. Upton. The Great Conflagration. Chicago, Illinois: Union Publishing Co., 1871; p. 159.

• Franklin William Scott. Newspapers and Periodicals of Illinois, 1814-1879. Collections of the Illinois State Historical Library, vol 6, Bibliographical Series, vol 1. Springfield, Illinois: Illinois State Historical Library, 1910; p. 105. [archive.org]

The Little Missionary ; Dec 1870-1920

edited by: Amadeus Abraham Reinke

• 1898, J. Taylor Hamilton

• 1906-1913, John F. Romig

published: Bethlehem, Pennsylvania: Henry T. Clauder.

• Nazareth, Pennsylvania: O. Eugene Moore, 1900.

frequency: monthly

description: 4 pp.; page size, 21″ h x 14″ w; price, 30¢/ year

• Circulation: 1872, 6,700-8,000 [Jensz; p. 175]

• 1908, 3,504

• Religious focus: Moravian

relevant information: Apparently intended for the “English Sunday schools.” [“Religious”]

changed to: The Moravian Missionary

source of information: Jensz; Rowell; Levering; Stocker; Proceedings

available: AASHistPer, series 5 (1874-1876 only)

• A story was reprinted in the Memphis Daily Appeal [Memphis, Tennessee; 23 Feb 1873; p. 2]

bibliography:

• “Religious.” The Philadelphia Inquirer [Philadelphia, Pennsylvania] 14 Jan 1871; p. 2.

Geo. P. Rowell & Co.’s American Newspaper Directory. New York: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1872; p. 151. [archive.org]

Geo. P. Rowell & Co’s American Newspaper Directory for 1877. New York: Geo. P. Rowell & Co.;, 1877; 264. [google books]

• “Unitas Fratrum.” Lancaster New Era [Lancaster, Pennsylvania] 22 May 1884; p. 4.

• “Points About People.” The Allentown Leader [Allentown, Pennsylvania] 8 Dec 1893; p. 1.

• “The Moravian Synod.” Lancaster New Era [Lancaster, Pennsylvania] 9 Sept 1898; p. 2. Also, The News-Journal [Lancaster, Pennsylvania] 10 Sept 1898; p. 3.

• “Bought the Moravian.” The Allentown Leader [Allentown, Pennsylvania] 20 Jan 1900; p. 1.

• “Moravian Publications Removed.” Lancaster New Era [Lancaster, Pennsylvania] 9 Feb 1900; p. 2.

• Joseph Mortimer Levering. A History of Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, 1741-1892. Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, 1903; p. 713. [archive.org]

• “Arranging for Third Summer Conference of Ministers and Christian Workers.” Intelligencer Journal [Lancaster, Pennsylvania] 20 June 1906; p. 5.

• “Synod Hears Reports of Educational Institutions.” Lancaster New Era [Lancster, Pennsylvania] 4 Sept 1908; p. 2.

• “Lititz News.” The Lancaster Morning Journal [Lancaster, Pennsylvania] 19 Feb 1913; p. 4.

• Harry Emilius Stocker. A History of the Moravian Church in New York City. New York: N.p., 1922; pp. 301-302. [archive.org]

Proceedings of the Society for Propagating the Gospel Among the Heathen, for the Year Ending August 23, 1906. Bethlehem, Pennsylvania: Society for Propagating the Gospel Among the Heathen, 1906; p. 13. [archive.org]

• Felicity Jensz. “Firewood, Fakirs and Flags: The Construction of the Non-Western ‘Other’ in a Nineteenth Century Transnational Children’s Periodical.” Schweizerischen Zeitschrift für Religions-und Kulturgeschichte 105 (2011); pp. 167-191.

The Little Schoolmate ; Dec 1870-Jan 1876; May 1876?

cover/masthead: 1872-1873

edited by: New York Catholic Protectory

published: West Chester, New York: New York Catholic Protectory.

frequency: Dec 1870-1875, monthly; May 1876, semimonthly

description: 8 pp.; page size, 28″ h x 21″ w; price, 50¢/ year

• Circulation: 1872, 4,000

• Religious focus: Catholic

relevant information: Edited and printed by boys, who ran the presses for the Protectory.

source of information: AASHistPer, series 5; Rowell; “Charity”

available: AASHistPer, series 5

bibliography:

• notice. De la Salle Monthly 5 (Aug 1871); p. 99. [google books]

Geo. P. Rowell & Co.’s American Newspaper Directory. New York: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1872; p. 135. [archive.org]

Geo. P. Rowell & Co.’s American Newspaper Directory for 1873. New York: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1873; p. 245. [archive.org]

• advertisement for press of Boys’ Catholic Protectory. Sadliers’ Catholic Directory, Almanac, and Ordo … for 1875. New York: D. & J. Sadlier & Co., 1875; “Publishers and Booksellers,” p. 37. [google books]

Geo. P. Rowell & Co’s American Newspaper Directory for 1875. New York: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1875; p. 253; online at UNT Digital Library

Trow’s New York City Directory … for the Year Ending May 1 1877, comp. H. Wilson. New York: Trow City Directory Company, 1876; p. 44. [google books]

• “A Great Catholic Charity.” Notre Dame Scholastic 9 (25 March 1876); p. 470; online at University of Notre Dame Archives

• Thomas C. Middleton. “Catholic Periodicals Published in the United States.” Records of the American Catholic Historical Society of Philadelphia. N.p.: American Catholic Historical Society of Philadelphia, 1908; vol 19, p. 35. [google books]

Loving Words for Children ; 1871-after 1872

edited by: E. Payson Hammond

published: Boston, Massachusetts: Willard Tract Repository.

frequency: monthly

description: 8 pp.; 9″ h x 7″ w; price, none

• Religious focus

relevant quotes:

• The editor apparently planned for the magazine to make no money for anyone associated with it: “[M]any papers are published just to make money, but that is not the object of this paper. No one is to receive any pay at all for their writings or labors for it.” [in Little Corporal]

• The magazine took no advertisements. In place of listing a subscription price, the editor requested donations: “But how will it live in this material world, if it takes ‘no pay?’ Well, we notice a little note at the end of the last page, which says, ‘All donations in aid of the circulation of this paper will be acknowledged in the succeeding number, giving the initials of the donor. All communications should be addressed to Charles Cutler, 18 Ashburton Place, Boston, Mass.’ ” [Little Corporal]

source of information: Rowell; Little Corporal

bibliography:

• notice. The Congregationalist 29 Dec 1870; p. 414.

• “ ‘Loving Words for Children.’ ” Little Corporal 12 (Feb 1871); p. 65.

• “Our Exchanges: Loving Words for Children.” Home Guardian 33 (1 July 1871); p. 215.

Geo. P. Rowell & Co.’s American Newspaper Directory. New York: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1872; p. 75. [archive.org]

Happy Hours ; 1871-1872

edited by: O. A. Roorbach

published: New York, New York: O. A. Roorbach; publisher at 102 Nassau St. New York, New York: Happy Hours Company, 1872; publisher at 22 Ann St.

frequency: monthly

description: 16 pp.; price, 1 copy, 25¢/ year; 5 copies, $1/ year

• Circulation, 1872, 6,000

source of information: Youth’s Companion ; Christian Union

bibliography:

• advertisement. The Youth’s Companion 44 (19 Jan 1871); p. 24.

• advertisement. Christian Union 3 (12 April 1871); p. 225.

• advertisement. Christian Union 5 (24 Jan 1872); p. 103.

Geo. P. Rowell & Co.’s American Newspaper Directory. New York: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1872; p. 126. [archive.org]

Apples of Gold ; 1871-1917

published: Boston, Massachusetts: Hurd & Houghton, for the American Tract Society.

frequency: weekly

description: 4 pp.; printed in color

• Circulation: 1872, 47,000 [“The American Tract Society”]

relevant quotes:

• “For youngest readers the American Tract Society provides Apples of Gold, the first volume of an illustrated weekly, which is rendered doubly attractive by its generous type and abundant engravings.” [“Juvenile Books.” The Independent 21 Nov 1872: 6.]

• “ … [T]his one is for the earliest stage, the little four and six year olds, two pages of it each week being printed in large, clear type, and expressed in short, simple words, that can readily be mastered by the little ones themselves in their first lisping efforts at reading.” [“Apples of Gold” Old Dominion Magazine; p. 65]

relevant information:

• Intended for “infant classes.” [notice. Christian Union]

• The bound volume for 1872 was available for $1. [advertisement. The Independent] The bound volume included an extra four full-page color illustrations. [notice of bound volume]

source of information: notices, etc., below; OCLC

available: AASHistPer, series 5 (1874 only)

bibliography:

• notice. The Christian World 21 (Oct 1870); p. 327.

• notice. Christian World 23 (June 1872); p. 199.

• notice of bound volume. Vermont Watchman and State Journal [Montpelier, Vermont] 12 June 1872; p. 1. Also, abridged notice of bound volume. The Burlington Free Press [Burlington, Vermont] 8 June 1872; p. 3.

• “The American Tract Society.” Argus and Patriot [Montpelier, Vermont] 20 June 1872; p. 4.

• advertisement. The Independent 17 Oct 1872; p. 6.

• “Juvenile Books.” The Independent 21 Nov 1872; p. 6.

• notice. Christian Union 13 Dec 1871; p. 382.

• “Apples of Gold.” Zion’s Herald 31 Oct 1872; p. 521.

• “Book Notices.” Portland Transcript [Portland, Maine] 36 (2 Nov 1872); p. 242.

• notice. Ladies’s Repository 9 (Dec 1872); p. 469.

• “Our Book Table.” Vermont Chronicle [Bellows Falls, Vermont] 21 Dec 1872; p. 3.

• “Apples of Gold.” The Old Dominion Magazine 7 (1 Jan 1873); p. 65-66.

Every Boy’s Magazine ; 1871

edited by: William Rideing; 1871, 4 Province Court

published: Boston, Massachusetts: William H. Rideing; publisher at 4 Province Court

frequency: monthly

description: 12 pp.; page size, 12″ h x 9″ w; price, 50¢/ year

• Circulation. 800

relevant information: Apparently only one issue: not listed in Rowell in 1872; and all reprinted extracts appear in the 1 Jan 1871 issue.

relevant quotes:

• “A new monthly periodical, called Every Boy’s Magazine, is to be published here [Boston], by Mr. W. H. Rideing, the first number to appear with the new year. As its name implies, it will be devoted to the entertainment of boys, and will be published at the low price of fifty cents per year. the proprietor has had considerable experience in connection with magazines and newspapers in England and in this country, and is likely to make his new venture valuable and popular.” [“Literary News”]

• Rideing was precise about his audience: “Believing that a sound, wholesome Magazine for boys—we include all who have not seen twenty-one in the term—is wanted, and that if well and consistently conducted, such a venture would be supported, we issue “Every Boy’s Magazine,” with an earnest intention to spare no pains that can make it fulfill the comprehensiveness of its title. Strange to say, there is not a single periodical of merit that can claim to be devoted to boys. There are, it is true, unfortunately, clumsy weekly broad-sheets, blood-and-thundery in tone, questionable in morals, and alarmingly feeble in grammar, which find many readers among youth; but other than these there is no distinctly boys’ publication. We cannot help thinking, therefore, that there is abundant room for such a paper as ours. But should we find there is not room, we are determined to publish a magazine, so excellent, pertinent, and beneficial in character, that it shall speedily make room wherever boys are.” [“Ourselves.” 1 Jan 1871; p. 6]

• The magazine was to cover a variety of subjects: “A series of sketches of ‘Eminent Living Journalists’ will be furnished by the editor and others. We expect our department for ‘Amateur Mechanics’ will become immensely popular; and we shall do all in our power to cultivate the practical in our readers. Then we shall have sprightly articles on indoor and outdoor games, sports, and recreations; fascinating sketches of natural history, travel, and adventure. We have made special provision for postage stamp collectors, and an experienced philatelist will contribute and illustrated monthly record of newly issued stamps—and all other matters of interest to collectors. In every department and all respects shall we aim to amuse, instruct, and make better.” [“Ourselves.” 1 Jan 1871; p. 6]

• The magazine was proposed at 16 pages, but published at fewer; however, more was promised: “Instead of sixteen pages, as first proposed, we give twelve of a greater size; but if our subscribers assist us we will have an immediate enlargement.” [“Ourselves.” 1 Jan 1871; p. 6] The twelve pages had three solid pages of advertising.

• The St. Joseph Saturday Herald homed in on a single serial: “the last literary sensation is a serial story in the new periodical, Every Boy’s Magazine, founded on the extraordinary romance of the Missing Earl of Aberdeen,” it announced on page 2 [“Current Paragraphs”], while on page 3 appeared a small advertisement for the magazine which focused on “Dod-Ma: The Missing Earl of Aberdeen.”

• “The Cheapest Magazine in the Country.” “As its name implies, EVERY BOY’S MAGAZINE is a periodical for youth of all ages, and it well fulfills the comprehensiveness of its title. In it boys will find all their diversified interests well attended to. Writers of the first rank contribute to its pages, and while it does not claim to be a religious paper, its purpose is to elevate, instruct, and make better.” [advertisement. Little Chief]

• Rideing offered advice to wouldbe contributors: “We shall be glad to receive manuscripts, and will give all our careful consideration, paying a fair price for those we accept, and returning to the writers, when postage stamps are inclosed for that purpose, those we cannot use. But the following rules must be complied with, or the waste-basket will be inevitable: All manuscripts must be written in a legible hand, on one side of the paper only; each page must be consecutively numbered at the right hand corner, and the full name and address of the author must accompany every manuscript. Do not forget the class of Every Boy’s Magazine, and that the articles most suitable to our pages are adventures, short stories, reminiscences of travel, historical or biographical sketches. Please don’t send love stories, romances of the middle ages or the South Sea Islands, if you have never been out of your own country. Exercise this self-denial for our sake.” [“Authors and Manuscripts.” 1 Jan 1871; p. 6]

source of information: Little Chief; AAS catalog

available:

• AASHistPer, series 5

• The Nashville Journal [Nashville, Illinois] reprinted “The Sagacity of Elephants.” [9 Feb 1871; p. 4.] The piece was reprinted by Youth’s Companion as “Polite Elephant” [28 Dec 1871].

• The Erie Ishmaelite [Erie, Kansas] reprinted “Scene in a School-Room,” by Lettice Thorpe [24 Feb 1871; p. 4]

• The Centralia Fireside Guard [Centralia, Missouri] reprinted “A Hotel in Siberia,” by Thomas W. Knox [1 April 1871; p. 4]

bibliography:

Geo. P. Rowell & Co.’s American Newspaper Directory. New York: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1871; p. 64. [hathitrust.org]

• “Literary News.” The Literary World 1 (1 Jan 1871); p. 126.

• “Current Paragraphs.” St. Joseph Saturday Herald [St. Joseph, Michigan] 14 Jan 1871; p. 2.

• “Dod—Ma.” St. Joseph Saturday Herald [St. Joesph, Michigan] 14 Jan 1871; p. 3.

• Every Boy’s Magazine. The News [Newport, Pennsylvania] 21 Jan 1871; p. 3. Also, The Star and Enterprise [Newville, Pennsylvania] 26 Jan 1871; p. 4.

• advertisement. Little Chief. 5 (Feb 1871): inside back cover (cover page 3).

• “Magazines, Etc.” Black River Gazette [Ludlow, Vermont] 10 Feb 1871; p. 7.

Der Kinder-Bote (Children’s messenger); 1871-?

edited by: A. O. Brickmann

published: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

frequency: monthly

description: Sunday-school paper of the Church of the New Jerusalem

• Religious focus: Swedenborgian

• German-language periodical

source of information: Arndt; Fraser

bibliography:

• Karl J. R. Arndt & May E. Olson. German-American Newspapers and Periodicals: 1732-1955. Heidelberg: Quelle & Meyer Publishers, 1961.

• Sybille Fraser. “German Language Children’s and Youth Periodicals in North America: A Checklist.” Phaedrus 6 (Spring 1979); pp. 27-31.

Little Christian ; 1871-1904?

published: Boston, Massachusetts: H. L. Hastings.

frequency: monthly

description: 4 pp.; page size, 14″ h x 11″ w. Prices, 25¢; 1870, 8 copies, $1/ year; 1872, 4 copies, $1/ year

• May have been supplement for The Christian (1866-after 1880); published by itself, however, by 1870

• Religious focus

relevant quotes:

• Advertisements for The Christian contained a list of what it didn’t contain; the list changed with the years: 1870: “No sectarianism, controversy, politics, puffs, pills, or patent medicines.” 1872: “No SECTARIANISM, Controversy, Politics, Puffs, Pills, Patent Medicines, Novels or Continued Stories, ALLOWED IN ITS COLUMNS.” 1880: “free from sectarianism, politics, controversy, advertisements, puffs, pills, and whisky bitters; containing pictures, stories, incidents, providences, answers to prayer, poetry, music, Temperance, religion, and common sense.”

source of information: NUC; OCLC; Rowell

available: AASHistPer, series 5

bibliography:

• advertisement for The Christian. Springville Journal [Springville, New York] 19 Nov 1870; p. 5.

Geo. P. Rowell & Co.’s American Newspaper Directory. New York: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1872; p. 75. [archive.org]

• advertisement for The Christian. Rutland Independent [Rutland, Vermont] 17 Aug 1872; p. 8.

• advertisement. Raleigh Christian Advocate [Raleigh, North Carolina] 24 Nov 1880; p. 8.

• advertisement. New York Evangelist 51 (30 Dec 1880); p. 7.

• notice. Christian Union 29 (10 April 1884); p. 358.

The Child’s Friend ; 1871?-after 1873

edited by: C. G. G. Paine

published: Chicago, Illinois: Bright Side Company.

frequency: 1872, monthly • 1873, semimonthly

description:

• 1872: 4 pp.; page size, 19″ h x 13″ w; price, 25¢/ year

• 1873: 4 pp.; price, 50¢/ year

• Religious focus: It was “designed especially for Sunday schools.”

relevant information:

• The Friend was created as a result of the Chicago Fire. Until Nov 1871, its parent periodical, The Bright Side, was published in a weekly edition and a semimonthly edition; after the Fire destroyed much of Chicago’s publishing community, the weekly Bright Side merged with a family magazine, and the semimonthly Bright Side became The Child’s Friend.

• C. G. G. Paine, who edited the Bright Side 1871 through 1873, was a teacher in the Chicago High School. [When providing your supply of reading for the year]

• Though the Bright Side Company advertised for printers and agents through July 1873, efforts to keep the Friend and its companion Bright Side alive failed, and the business went bankrupt, owing subscribers about $500. In 1874, the bankruptcy was finalized: “In the matter of the Bright Side Company, George W. Campbell, the Assignee, filed a petition stating that the Company issued two publlications, the Bright Side Family Circle and the Child’s Friend. There is due to subscribers on these papers about $500, and due the Company on unpaid subscriptions $200. Alfred Martin, of Philadelphia, has agreed to take the burden of filling the subscriptions on condition of receiving an assignment of the debts due, and the Assignee asks that such an arrangement may be allowed, which was granted.” [“The Courts”]

created from:The Bright Side • Bright Side and Family Circle ; July 1869-after 29 June 1873

source of information: Notice; Rowell; Scott

bibliography:

• notice. The Advance 5 (28 Dec 1871); p. 5.)

Geo. P. Rowell & Co.’s American Newspaper Directory. New York: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1872; p. 31. [archive.org]

• “The Magazines, Etc.: The Bright Side.” The Advance 5 (8 Feb 1872); p. 6.

• The Bright Side and Family Circle. Decatur Weekly Republican [Decatur, Illinois] 8 Feb 1872; p. 5. Also, The Courier [Waterloo, Iowa] 15 Feb 1872; p. 3. Also, Nashville Journal [Nashville, Illinois] 17 Feb 1872; p. 7.

• When providing your supply of reading for the year. The Donaldsonville Chief [Donaldsonville, Louisiana] 22 Feb 1873; p. 2.

• “The Courts: Bankruptcy Items.” Chicago Tribune [Chicago, Illinois] 6 Feb 1874; p. 7.

• Franklin William Scott. Newspapers and Periodicals of Illinois, 1814-1879. Collections of the Illinois State Historical Library, vol 6, Bibliographical Series, vol 1. Springfield, Illinois: Illinois State Historical Library, 1910; p. 110. [archive.org]

Youth’s Gazette ; 1871

published: San Francisco, California: William C. Forde

relevant information: Perhaps never published; copies of the Gazette have not been located, and it appears in no business directories. “Small Rivals” includes the only mention of the periodical thus far encountered.

relevant quote: The Gazette apparently was Forde’s attempt to regroup after an acrimonious split with his business partner, with whom he published The Pacific Youth. J. Clarence Collins and his brothers removed the Youth’s business offices to another address. [“Removed”] Though Forde occupied the original office, his attempt to control the business by getting the subscriptions from one of the Youth’s agents ended in larceny and assault: “There are two juvenile papers published in this city, called the Pacific Youth and the Youth’s Gazette, between whom there exists a strong rivalry, and, as far as we could learn from the case, one of the papers is a split from the other. A man named Turner carries the Youth every week, and last week, while quitely [sic] attending to his business, he was accosted by John Shea, who said he wished to have his name put down as a subscriber to the Youth, and when Mr. Turner took out his pencil to write it down in his book, Shea snatched the book away from him and threw it to another man, who turned out to be William C. Foard, [sic] proprietor of the Gazette. Turner immediately saw that it was a ‘put up job’ between Shea, who is the printer in the Gazette office, and Foard, and had them arrested on charges of assault and battery and petty larceny, but when he recovered the book accounts amounting to about $20 were gone. The charge of assault and battery was dismissed, and the petty larceny case continued, so that the parties might have a chance to compromise the matter.” [“Small Rivals”]

split from: The Pacific Youth (1870-1872)

source of information: articles, below

bibliography:

• Henry G. Langley, comp. The San Francisco Directory for the Year Commencing April, 1871. San Francisco, California: Henry G. Langley, 1871; pp. 167, 256, 512. [ancestry.com]

• “Removed.” San Francisco Chronicle [San Francisco, California] 11 June 1871; p. 2.

• “The ‘Pacific Youth’ War.” San Francisco Bulletin 15 June 1871; p. 3.

• “The ‘Pacific Youth’ War.” San Francisco Bulletin 16 June 1871; p. 3.

• “Small Rivals.” San Francisco Chronicle [San Francisco, California] 29 June 1871; p. 3.

Our Little People (also, Our Little People Quarterly) ; Jan 1871-1934

edited by: Rev. A[tticus] G[reene] Haygood, 1871-1873

• W. G. E. Cunnyngham, 1875-1876

published: Nashville, Tennessee: Whitmore & Smith

frequency:

• 1871, monthly?

• 1914, quarterly

description: 7.25″ h

• 1875: 1 copy, 30¢/ year; 10 copies, $1.10/ year

• 1880: 4 pp.

• For children 6 to 8 years old

• Circulation: 1871, 20,000 copies/ month. 1873, 50,000 copies/ month. 1899, 210,000. 1903, 205,000. 1908, 168,733/ week; 2,025,000/ year. 1911, 193,500/ quarter; 774,000/ year. 1914, 228,000

• Religious focus: Methodist Episcopal

continued by: Primary Class

source of information: Batsel; NUC

bibliography:

• “Periodical Publications.” Republican Banner [Nashville, Tennessee] 26 March 1871; p. 4.

• “Methodist Publishing House.” Republican Banner [Nashville, Tennessee] 2 march 1873; p. 3.

• “Periodicals.” The Milan Exchange [Milan, Tennessee] 9 Dec 1875; p. 2.

• “Sunday School Periodicals.” Raleigh Christian Advocate [Raleigh, North Carolina] 14 July 1880; p. 5.

• “The Virginia Conference: Literature Used.” Virginian-Pilot [Norfolk, Virginia] 16 Nov 1899; p. 11.

• “Notes and Personals.” North Carolina Christian Advocate [Greensboro, North Carolina] 13 May 1903; p. 9.

• “Interesting Figures given.” Nashville Banner [Nashville, Tennessee] 24 Jan 1908; p. 4.

• “Many Church Publications: Methodist Publications.” Nashville Banner [Nashville, Tennessee] 13 Sept 1911; p. 7.

• “For National House: Publishing House Prosperous.” The Baltimore Sun [Baltimore, Maryland] 14 May 1914; p. 10

• “Some Facts of Interest.” North Carolina Christian Advocate [Greensboro, North Carolina] 8 Oct 1914; p. 11.

Lutherisches Kinder- und Jugendblatt (Lutheran children’s and young people’s paper); Jan 1871-Dec 1938

edited by: L. W. Dorn; Johann Paul Beyer

published: St. Louis, Missouri: Concordia Publishing House, Jan 1871-Dec 1938.

frequency: monthly

description: 16 pp.; quarto

• Organ of the German Evangelical Lutheran Synod of Missouri, Ohio, and other states

• Religious focus: Lutheran

• German-language periodical

source of information: Arndt; Fraser

bibliography:

• Karl J. R. Arndt & May E. Olson. German-American Newspapers and Periodicals: 1732-1955. Heidelberg: Quelle & Meyer Publishers, 1961.

• Sybille Fraser. “German Language Children’s and Youth Periodicals in North America: A Checklist.” Phaedrus 6 (Spring 1979); pp. 27-31.

The Children’s Paper ; Jan 1871-after 1873

published: Dayton, Ohio: Henry J. Kurtz.

frequency: monthly

description: 4 pp.; page size, 21″ h x 15″ w. Price: 1871, 40¢/ year; 1872-1873, 30¢/ year. 1873, 25¢/ year

• Religious focus: United Brethren in Christ

relevant information: Groups of 13 subscribers for 1873 received a map of Palestine.

source of information: Rowell

bibliography:

• advertisement. The Gospel Visitor 21 (Jan 1871); back cover (cover page 4). [archive.org]

Geo. P. Rowell & Co.’s American Newspaper Directory. New York: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1872; p. 143. [archive.org]

• “Books and Papers.” Northern Ohio Journal [Painesville, Ohio] 19 Oct 1872; p. 2.

• advertisement. Western Reserve Chronicle 57 (13 Nov 1872); p. 1; online at Library of Congress Historic American Newspapers

Geo. P. Rowell & Co.’s American Newspaper Directory. New York: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1873; p. 173. [archive.org]

• “Map of Palestine.” The Friday Jeffersonian [Findlay, Ohio] 18 April 1873; p. 1.

The Sunday-School MagazineChurch School Magazine ; Jan 1871-Dec 1931

edited by: 1871-1872, A. G. Haygood

published: Nashville, Tennessee: Publishing House of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, Jan 1871-Dec 1931.

frequency: monthly; 1 vol/ year

description: 32 pp.; page size, 8.5″ h; price, $1

• Circulation: 1872, 1,200. 1873, 12,000

• Religious focus: Methodist Episcopal

source of information: OCLC; Rowell

available: AASHistPer, series 5 (1876 only)

bibliography:

• “Church Celebrities”: Rev. A. G. Haygood, D. D. Republican Banner [Nashville, Tennessee] 2 April 1871; p. 4.

• “Methodist Publishing House.” Republican Banner [Nashville, Tennessee] 2 March 1873; p. 3.

Geo. P. Rowell & Co.’s American Newspaper Directory. New York: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1872; p. 173. [archive.org]

Young Israel (also Libanon) ; Jan 1871-1900

edited by: Louis Schnabel • Morris Brecher

published: New York, New York: L. Schnabel & M. Brecher, the Hebrew Orphan Asylum Printing Establishment.

frequency: monthly

description: 48 pp.; page size, 9.5″ h; price, $3/ year • Oct 1875-May 1878: includes Libanon, German supplement

• Religious focus: Jewish

relevant information:

• Printed by the young people of the Hebrew Orphan Asylum Printing establishment

• Though some sources list the Young Israel as being published until around 1900, Richman states that “[i]t was published for about five years, when for financial reasons the publication was discontinued.” An obituary of Louis Schnabel in 1888 speaks of the paper in past tense.

continued by: Israel’s Home Journal (for adults)

source of information: NUC; OCLC; Richman

bibliography:

• Antelope. “Our New York Letter.” The Times-Picayune [New Orleans, Louisiana] 11 Jan 1871; p. 1.

• notice. The American Israelist [Cincinnati, Ohio] 17 Feb 1871; p. P10.

• notice. The American Israelist [Cincinnati, Ohio] 19 May 1871; p. P9.

• notice of issue #8. The American Israelist [Cincinnati, Ohio] 18 Aug 1871; p. P9.

• “New York Charities.” The American Israelite [Cincinnati, Ohio] 8 Nov 1872; p. P9.

• advertisement. The American Israelite [Cincinnati, Ohio] 27 June 1873; p. P7.

• advertisement. The American Israelite [Cincinnati, Ohio] 11 June 1874; p. P7.

• Julia Richman. “The Jewish Sunday School Movement in the United States.” The Jewish Voice [St. Louis, Missouri] 31 Aug 1900; pp. 5-6.

• Naomi M. Patz and Philip E. Miller. “Jewish Religious Children’s Literature in America: An Analytical Survey.” Phaedrus 7 (Spring/Summer 1980); p. 21.

Morning Light ; Jan 1871-after Jan 1877

cover/masthead: 1871, 1876

published: New York, New York: American Tract Society.

frequency: monthly

description: 8 pp.; page size, 10″ h. Price, 8 copies, $1; 100 copies, $12.00

• Religious focus

relevant quotes:

• Intended for “Infant Classes, Mission Schools, Freedmen, and Foreigners wishing to learn English: for beginners, old or young.” [1 (Feb 1871); p. 24]

• The issues for 1872 were available as a bound volume: “Morning Light. Volume II., for the year 1872, with illustrated paper cover, and plentifully supplied throughout with beautiful wood-cut pictures, to please the little folks. It contains alphabets of various sized letters, easy lessons for little learners in words of one syllable, simply-told, instructive stories, and poetry for the youngest. A choice gem to aid the mother, or to enliven the nursery. Price only 35 cents.” [Christian World Jan 1873]

• An advertisement in 1877 points out that this eight-page monthly “can be divided into a semi-monthly four-page paper.” [“It Costs No More”]

continues: Our School and Our Home

source of information: AAS catalog; OCLC; notices, etc., below

available: AASHistPer, series 5

bibliography:

• advertisement. Reformed Church Messenger 37 (25 Jan 1871); p. 8.

• notice. Tunkhannock Republican [Tunkhannock, Pennsylvania] 22 Feb 1871; p. 3.

• notice. Christian World 23 (June 1872); p. 199.

• notice of bound volume. Christian World 24 (Jan 1873); p. 29.

• advertisement: “It Costs No More.” Vermont Chronicle [Bellows Falls, Vermont] 27 Jan 1877; p. 4.

Young Folks Journal (also Little Things); March 1871-May 1874

published: Brinton, Pennsylvania

frequency: monthly

description: Amateur publication

source of information: NUC

Our Young Folks’ Illustrated Paper ; 1 Oct 1871-15 Dec 1873

cover/masthead: 1871-1873

edited by: E[dward] C. Allen

published: Augusta, Maine: E. C. Allen & Co.

frequency: semimonthly

description: 8 pp.; quarto; page size, 15.75″ h x 11″ w; price, $1/ year

• Circulation: Oct 1871 (from magazine), 1,000,000 copies; 15 Dec 1871 (from magazine), 500,000; 1872, 330,000

• In 1871-1872, each issue included an engraving and biography of “distinguished scholars” in various high schools, mostly in Augusta; the column was similar to one appearing in 1872 in Frank Leslie’s Boys’ and Girls’ Weekly.

relevant quotes:

• The paper’s introduction to its readers was … extensive, with the Paper trumpeting its accomplishments over five separate pieces extolling the color print of Niagara Falls sent as a premium (“Our Fifteen Dollar Chromo”); announcing that “as long as money expended without stint, and the united energy of the publishers and editors, can make it so, Our Young Folks’ Illustrated Paper shall be the best publication for the young, in America. The illustrations alone will cost us over twenty-five thousand dollars per year” (“To Our Friends”); reprinting a note from a paper supplier that the publishers had “given us an order for printing paper,—to be delivered as fast as they need it—amounting to two hundred and fifty thousand dollars” (“The Cost of Printing Paper”); asserting that “[w]e announced the general character of the paper, and were greeted at once by a rush of subscribers, and at the present date we are most happy to be able to say that Our Young Folks’ Illustrated Paper has a larger number of actual subscribers than any other paper of its class,” and that “[o]f this, the first number, we print the immense number of One Million Copies” (“One Million Copies”); and that “it always gives us the greatest pleasure to mingle with young people, from prattling infancy up to those who begin to think they are getting too old to be called ‘young folks,’ but we hope to drive away from all the idea that they are too old to have young hearts, and we intend to make joyous, happy children of all our readers, whether they bound abroad with the flush of youth, or stoop with the weight of years. We expect ringing peals of laughter, and the clapping of tiny hands for joy at our coming will be heard at every fireside, and on every play-ground, and when the eye whose lustre years have dimmed shall peruse our pages, the cheerful smile and gathering tear will attest the awakening of thoughts of early days, of dreams of youth long since forgotten, now returned to brighten the skies and make hearts young again. We hope to be always the most welcome guest,—no, not exactly that,—we hope to be so essential to every household, as to be counted one of the family, on no account to be parted with.” (“Our Bow”) [1 (1 Oct 1871); p. 6]

• The Paper hoped to appeal to a wide range of readers: “Little children who delight to listen to tales of fairy-land; little girls anxious to dress dolly in a pleasing style; little boys who love their toys and puzzles, to frolic on the green or tumble in the snow; youths inspired by a hopeful glance forward to years of riper activity; manhood who would avoid the shoals and quicksands, the rocks and perils on the voyage of life, and reach the other shore with a stainless soul; old age just on the shores of Time’s dark river, who would look back through the dim vista of years, and remember again the bright beginning of its pilgrimage; fathers, who would have their sons and daughters take places of usefulness and honor in life’s great struggle; mothers, the most sacred of all,—can there be a hope, a thought, a care for her offspring, not found in the mother’s heart? no, not one,—but to you all we bring greeting; may your latest memory cling fondly to the hour when we, no longer strangers, appeared among you, friends, companions, playfellows—all that you may hope for that is pure and ennobling, we shall devote our energies to assist you in attaining—and may you all long live to hail with joy the arrival of Our Young Folks’ Illustrated Paper.” [“Our Bow.” 1 (1 Oct 1871); p. 6]

• The second issue promised great things: “Our Young Folks’ Illustrated Paper [h]as now been before the public long enough for us to ascertain how well we have succeeded in catering to please the young people, and old people, too, who have young hearts. We are very much flattered at our success at getting up the paper, which we are assured by thousands of subscribers in all parts of the country, is just such a publication as they have long desired, and will patronize as long as it is kept up to its present standard. We assure all that our efforts shall be untiring, and our money shall be expended without stint, for all necessary purposes ever to make Our Young Folks’ Illustrated Paper, the most interesting, useful, entertaining, and elevating young folks’ publication in the world.” [1 (15 Oct 1871); p. 12]

• The new offices of Allen & Co. were described in a flattering article in 1871: “Messrs. Allen & Co. have just moved into their new publishing house, which they have built during the past summer. It is an elegant structure of brick, with granite and freestone trimmings. All the fitting inside are superb. The first story is used for a storage room, and here may be seen, at any time, tons upon tons of paper, waiting for the printing presses. The second story is the pressroom, where on an average, one hundred thousand papers per day are printed and folded. The folding is done by machines, folding sixty papers per minute. The third story is the mailing department, and included in the furnishing of this room, are thirty tons of type, which is required for printing the names of subscribers on the papers. The names of subscribers are printed on the papers at the rate of sixty per minute, by wonderful little machines. The fourth and fifth stories are devoted to the compositors department, and the business and private offices of the establishment, which are fitted up and furnished with the greatest elegance. The sixth story is devoted to an electrotype foundry, and a department for folding pamphlets, circulars, &c. The entire building is warmed by steam, and pure water runs to every department and room. The cost of the building exceeds one hundred thousand dollars, and is a standing witness to the energy of the enterprising publishers.” [“A Great Publishing Enterprise”]

• As an inducement to subscribe, the Paper was bundled with one of Allen’s story papers for $3; subscribers also would receive “an elegant framed picture.” The bargain sometimes worked better for the publisher or the agent accepting subscriptions, as evidenced by a complaint in the Vermont Journal: “The papers have not yet been forthcoming, ditto the pictures. Neither has the agent, who has been written to, been heard from in reply. Nor, indeed, does the Publishing Company, who have been written to about the matter, seem disposed to throw any light upon the subject. Is the whole thing a swindle?” [“Quechee”]

• In 1872, Allen was sued by Osgood & Co., publisher of Our Young Folks, for infringing their title: “The complainants are the well-known publishers of Boston, who are proprietors and publishers of ‘Our Young Folks,’ an illustrated magazine for young people, first published in December, 1864. The title of the magazine was entered according to law, for the purpose of securing the copyright, and each number of the magazine has been copyrighted before publication. Complainants allege an exclusive right to use the title ‘Our Young Folks,’ arising from the copyright so obtained, and from the fact that they were the first to apply the title to a magazine, etc. The respondent, a publisher at Augusta, Me., announced that he would publish, … commencing October 1, 1871, an illustrated publication for young people, under the title ‘Our Young Folks’ Illustrated Paper,’ and did issue a very large edition of the same, and, upon demand by the complainants before publication, he refused and still refuses to withdraw the announcement or to change the title, and has published and sold large numbers under said title. Relief is sought by complainants not only under the law of copyright but upon the general ground of equity as related to the good will of trades and the doctrine of trade-marks. … The agreed statement of facts is silent on the question whether the public are deceived or are in danger of being deceived as alleged. And whether the customers of the complainants or the public are induced to believe, or are in danger of being induced to believe, that respondent’s publication is in fact the complainants’, and thereby led to the purchase of the respondent’s magazine under the belief that it is the complainants’. The case will, therefore, be referred to a master to ascertain and report the fact upon the foregoing questions to the court, and further proceedings in the case will be stayed until the coming in of the master’s report. R. M. Morse, Jr., and R. Stone, Jr., Butler & Fessenden of Portland, for plaintiffs; Causten Browne and J. S. Holmes, A. R. Strout of Portland, for defendants.” [“Law and the Courts”] The case was interesting, as the Morning Oregonian explains: “Osgood & Co. brought suit to restrain the publication of Allen’s magazine, basing their claims for relief upon two grounds: First, that the copyright secured to them the exclusive right to use the title; and, second, that in the name of their magazine, regardless of the question of copyright, they were entitled to protection on principles analogous to those upon which trade marks are protected. It was alleged in the complaint that the similarity of names misled and deceived the public. The first point the court—Judge Shepley—overruled, holding that the copyright gave no protection to the title page separately, or in any manner except as it constituted a part of the book. But he sustained the complaint on the second point, and held that a name lawfully adopted stands the same before the law as a trade mark, and is entitled to protection against piracy, upon recognized principles of equity-jurisprudence. The case was referred to a master to take the evidence and to report whether the facts were as alledged.” [“An Interesting Decision”] By the end of the year, however, both periodicals had ceased publication.

• The last issue of the Paper announced its demise: “Our Young Folks’ Illustrated Paper has been consolidated with The Maine State Magazine, and all subscribers will hereafter be supplied with that publication for the length of time that they subscribed. The Maine State Magazine is a large monthly publication, very handsomely illustrated, and contains an extensive Young Folks’ Department. It is published by Messrs. True, Hallett & Co., Portland, Maine. We are sure this will be amply satisfactory to all subscribers, and under existing circumstances, we are most happy at having been able to make so favorable an arrangement. We thank our friends most heartily for their patronage and good will. Our Young Folks’ Illustrated Paper now makes its most respectful bow, and retires.” [“Particular Notice to Subscribers!” 3 (15 Dec 1873); p. 48]

continued by: The Maine State Magazine

source of information: Oct 1871-Aug 1872, scattered issues (located in Winterthur Library, Wilmington, Delaware); notices, etc., below; AASHistPer; OCLC

available: AASHistPer, series 5

bibliography:

• notice. The Christian World 21 (Oct 1870); p. 327.

• notice. Maine Farmer 39 (17 June 1871); p. 2.

• notice. Maine Farmer 39 (19 Aug 1871); p. 2.

• notice. Maine Farmer 39 (28 Oct 1871); p. 2.

• “A Great Publishing Enterprise.” Black River Gazette [Ludlow, Vermont] 10 Nov 1871; p. 2.

Geo. P. Rowell & Co.’s American Newspaper Directory. New York: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1872; p. 67. [archive.org]

• E. Rowell. “The Press of Kennebec County.” In History of the Press of Maine, ed. Joseph Griffin. Brunswick: 1872; p. 99. [archive.org]

• J. R. Osgood & Co. The St. Johnsbury Caledonian [St. Johnsbury, Vermont] 5 April 1872; p. 3.

• notice. Christian World 23 (June 1872); p. 199.

• “Quechee.” Vermont Journal [Windsor, Vermont] 3 Aug 1872; p. 6.

• “Law and the Courts: James R. Osgood et al vs. Edward C. Allen.” The Boston Globe [Boston, Massachusetts] 4 Feb 1873; p. 5.

• “An Interesting Decision.” Morning Oregonian [Portland, Oregon] 18 Feb 1873; p. 2.

• Betty Longenecker Lyon. “A History of Children’s Secular Magazines Published in the United States from 1789-1899.” PhD diss. Johns Hopkins, 1942; pp. 245, 313-315.

Boys’ Ledger ; 1872-1873?

edited by: Percy W. Thompson

published: Washington, District of Columbia: Percy W. Thompson.

description: price, 25¢/ year

relevant information: Amateur periodical

source of information: Kelly; “Amateur Papers”

bibliography:

• “Amateur Papers.” Oliver Optic’s Magazine: Our Boys and Girls 13 (April 1873); p. 286.

Children’s Periodicals of the United States, ed. R. Gordon Kelly. Westport, Connecticut & London, England: Greenwood Press, 1984.

Good Words for the Children ; 1872-after 1878

edited by: M. K. Ware, 1874

published: Lexington, Kentucky: Transylvania Printing and Publishing Co., 1874-1878; publisher at 49 E. Main, 1876

frequency: semimonthly: 2nd & 4th Sunday each month

description: 1874: 4 pp.; 21″ h x 14″ w; price: 50¢/ year

• 1876: 4 pp.; price, $1.25/ year for the Good Words and the Children’s Friend

• Religious focus

relevant information:

• Alternates with The Children’s Friend, with the same editor and publisher

• Though Rowell says Good Words was founded in 1872, the issue for 10 Sept 1876 is vol 8 #47

source of information: AASHistPer; pieces listed below

available: AASHistPer, series 5 (as Good Words for Children; 1876 only)

bibliography:

Geo. P. Rowell & Co’s American Newspaper Directory. New York, New York: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1874; p. 72.

Kentucky State Gazetteer and Business Directory, for 1876-7. Louisville, Kentucky: R. L. Polk & Co., 1876; p. 238.

• A. Hogeland, comp. Centennial Report of the Mineral and Agricultural Resources of the State of Kentucky. N.p.: Courier-Journal Job Rooms, 1877; p. 35.

Pettengill’s Newspaper Directory and Advertisers’ Hand-Book for 1878. New York, New York: S. M. Pettengill & Co., 1878; p. 211.

Hebrew Sabbath School Companion ; 1872

published: New York: Adolph L. Sanger, A. S. Isaacs, and Morris S. Wise

relevant quote: “It lived only one year, dying of financial starvation.” [Richman]

source of information: Richman

bibliography:

• Julia Richman. “The Jewish Sunday School Movement in the United States.” The Jewish Voice [St. Louis, Missouri] 31 Aug 1900; p. 6.

Der Kinderfreund (The children’s friend); 1872-1874?

edited by: J. B. A. Ahrens

published: New Orleans, Louisiana: J. B. A. Ahrens.

frequency: monthly

description: Organ of the German Methodist Church, Southern Louisiana Conference

• German-language periodical

• Religious focus: Methodist

source of information: Arndt; Fraser

bibliography:

• Karl J. R. Arndt & May E. Olson. German-American Newspapers and Periodicals: 1732-1955. Heidelberg: Quelle & Meyer Publishers, 1961.

• Sybille Fraser. “German Language Children’s and Youth Periodicals in North America: A Checklist.” Phaedrus 6 (Spring 1979); pp. 27-31.

Our Little Ones ; 1872-1931 • Story World ; 1931-after 31 Aug 1969

published: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania: American Baptist Publication Society.

• Later issues: Valley Forge, Pennsylvania: American Baptist Board of Education and Publication.

frequency: weekly

description: 1876: 4 pp.; price, 1 copy, 50¢/ year

source of information: AAS catalog; OCLC; AASHistPer

available: AASHistPer, series 5 (1876 only)

Der Schutzengel (The guardian angel); 1872-1875?

frequency: monthly

description: 16 pp.; large quarto

• Religious focus: Roman Catholic

• German-language periodical

source of information: Arndt; Fraser

bibliography:

• Karl J. R. Arndt & May E. Olson. German-American Newspapers and Periodicals: 1732-1955. Heidelberg: Quelle & Meyer Publishers, 1961.

• Sybille Fraser. “German Language Children’s and Youth Periodicals in North America: A Checklist.” Phaedrus 6 (Spring 1979); pp. 27-31.

What Next? ; March 1872-1874

published: Chicago, Illinois: John B. Alden.

frequency: monthly

description: price: 1872-1873, 30¢/ year; 50¢/ year with a chromolithograph

• 1874, 25¢/ year

• Circulation: Feb 1873, 7039 new subscribers; April 1873, 36,000, “increasing now at the rate of 300 to 400 new names every day” [Eaton Democrat 17 April 1873] April 1873, 6,450 “cash subscriptions”

relevant information: Issues sometimes featured colored illustrations

relevant quote:

• Notices asserted that subscription rates were increasing: “[W]e are pleased to learn from the publisher that his receipts for June were more than double that of any previous month.” [Girard Press 11 July 1872]

• In keeping with contemporary publishers, in autumn Alden offered free issues to those who subscribed for the next year: “The four remaining numbers of the present year are offered free to subscribers for 1873, whose money is received during September.” [Monongahela Valley Republican 19 Sept 1872]

source of information: AAS catalog; OCLC; notices, etc., below

available: AASHistPer, series 5 (1873 only)

bibliography:

• “The Press.” Democrat and Chronicle [Rochester, New York] 10 April 1872; p. 2.

• “What Next.” Sterling Standard [Sterling, Illinois] 9 May 1872; p. 7.

• “What Next?” for June. Lake Geneva Herald [Lake Geneva, Wisconsin] 8 June 1872; p. 2.

• “What Next?” The Girard Press [Girard, Kansas] 11 July 1872; p. 3.

• “What Next?” Sterling Standard [Sterling, Illinois] 18 July 1872; p. 7.

• “What Next?” Monongahela Valley Republican [Monongahela, Pennsylvania] 19 Sept 1872; p. 4.

• “What Next?” Holton Express [Holton, Kansas] 17 Oct 1872; p. 4.

• advertisement. Christian Union 6 (6 Nov 1872); p. 399.

• “What Next?” Wyandot County Republican [Upper Sandusky, Ohio] 14 Nov 1872; p. 4.

• “What Next?” The Petroleum Centre Daily Record [Complanter, Pennsylvania] 9 Dec 1872; p. 2.

• advertisement. Sioux City Journal [Sioux City, Iowa] 17 Dec 1872; p. 3.

• advertisement. The Independent 25 (2 Jan 1873); p. 14.

• advertisement. New York Observer and Chronicle 51 (30 Jan 1873); p. 36. Also, 51 (20 March 1873); p. 92.

• “What Next?” Solomon Valley Pioneer [Lindsey, Kansas] 8 Feb 1873; p. 4.

• “What Next?” Mower County Transcript [Lansing, Minnesota] 13 March 1873; p. 3.

• “What Next?” The Eaton Democrat [Eaton, Ohio] 17 April 1873; p. 4.

• advertisement. Zion’s Herald 50 (1 May 1873); p. 144. Also, Christian Union 7 (28 May 1873); p. 3.

• “What Next?” Manhattan Beacon [Manhattan, Kansas] 17 May 1873; p. 7.

• “What Next?” The Weekly Herald [Chippewa Falls, Wisconsin] 7 June 1873; p. 4.

• “One Million Girls Wanted! and One Million Boys!” Christian Union 8 (24 Dec 1873); p. 4. Also, The Independent 26 (2 April 1874); p. 15.

The Young Cadet ; Aug-Oct 1872, Dec 1872-1873?

cover/masthead: 1872

edited by: Willett J. Hyatt

published: Poughkeepsie, New York: Willett J. Hyatt.

description: 1872, 16 pp.; price, $1/ year; newspaper format. 1873, 32 pp.; price, $1/ year (according to an advertisement); 64 pp.; price, 50¢/ year (according to prospectus) [“Grand Prospectus.” Dec 1872; p. 44]

• Dec 1872 issue is vol 1 #3

• No Nov 1872 issue: “[W]e have skipped one No. the November No. It is owing to the fact that we had no management of The Young Cadet until after Dec. 6th, when it was too late to think of getting out the Nov. No.” [“A Fraud.” Dec 1872; p. 44]

• The masthead declares that the Cadet is “The Official Organ of Cadets of Temperance.”

relevant information:

• While the masthead speaks “temperance,” an advertisement in the Dec 1872 issue of Cadet offered brandies and wines.

• Willett J. Hyatt was 18 in 1872 and promoted various amateur publications in the Cadet; he hopes to make the Cadet the “Champion Amateur of the World.” However, the Cadet also includes at least one page of advertisements for Poughkeepsie businesses and lists three advertising agents in Philadelphia, New York, and Boston.

• The Cadet printed a serial by Harry Castlemon and planned to print Horatio Alger in 1873.

• Hyatt led an … interesting life, keeping a hotel in Philadelphia, acting (sometimes) as a literary agent, hiring ministers to substitute for vacationing clergy, and pursuing studies in law school before dying of consumption at age 29. [Obituary]

relevant quotes:

• Hyatt seems to have gotten in over his head more than once: “In the last number of the Star Spangled Banner, published at Hinsdale, N. H., one Hyatt, who figured here [in Poughkeepsie] for a short time, is pretty roughly handled. In referring to an Ohio paper of the ‘dead-beat’ order, the Banner says: [‘]It[s] promises are not carried out, nor does it intend that they shall be. Of this same class was a certain “Young Cadet” published by a young sprout named Hyatt, at Poughkeepsie, N. Y. Hyatt received all he could get and has disappeared, returning no doubt to the classic shades of Castleton, Vt., where he was raised. He gave the Banner “fits” for exposing him as a swindler, but those whom he victimized can now judge if it would not have paid them to have heeded our warning.’ ” [“In the last number”] (Unfortunately, I’ve been unable to find the quoted piece.)

• A slightly tongue-in-cheek piece by a fledgling author considering placing a manuscript with Hyatt’s Athenaeum Bureau of Literature points up the tininess of Hyatt’s operation and the fact that Hyatt owed money: “Room No. 36 in the building at No. 37 Park-row is a small apartment, into which the sunlight never enters. Here, sitting at a desk beneath a lighted chandelier, a literary man from Nevada yesterday met Mr. Willett J. Hyatt, the manager of the ‘Athenaeum Bureau of Literature.’ … The gentleman who answered to the name of Hyatt is a small man, with a remarkably thick head of hair, and eyes that twinkle as they look at you. He seems to be perpetually winking at his visitors. The only other occupant of the room was a small girl, who was engaged in arranging circulars for the mail. She was a human automaton, taking no notice whatever of the conversation, but attending strictly to her work. Upon being informed of the object of the visit, Mr. Hyatt became very attentive to the Nevada man. He was anxious to see the manuscript of the new book, and was sure that if it was worthy of publication he could place it to much better advantage than his caller possibly could do. His bureau was in regular correspondence with 844 book publishers, and some of them would certainl[y] make the venture. The Nevada man wondered if the girl attended to all that correspondence.” [“A Bureau of Literature”] Hyatt’s response to the article delicately dissects the piece.

source of information: OCLC; AASHistPer; notices, below

available: AASHistPer, series 5 (Dec 1872 issue)

bibliography:

• advertisement. Knoxville Daily Chronicle [Knoxville, Tennessee] 6 March 1873; p. 4.

• “In the last number.” Poughkeepsie Journal [Poughkeepsie, New York] 15 Feb 1874; p. 3.

• “A Bureau of Literature: How to Make Money Out of Poor and Unknown Authors.” New York Times 8 Oct 1879; p. 8.

• Willett J. Hyatt. “The Athenaeum Bureau.” New York Times 13 Oct 1879; p. 3.

• Obituary of Willett J. Hyatt. The Brandon Union [Brandon, Vermont] 23 March 1883; p. 3.

The Young Folks Gem ; Nov 1872-after Nov 1876

published: Wadsworth, Ohio: John A. Clarke. One newspaper lists the publisher as George C. Bennett. [“Fragments: A correspondent”]

• Sharon Center, Ohio: John A. Clarke.

frequency: monthly

description: Page size, 7.75″ h • Newspaper format

• 1873-1876: 8 pp.

• Prices: 1873, 30¢/ year; 1874, 25¢/ year; 1875, 30¢/ year

relevant information: There may have been an attempt to resurrect the Gem in 1882: an advertisement for children to act as agents for the paper appeared in several newspapers. Price for subscription was 25¢/ year. There is no indication that the paper was published. [“Boys and girls are wanted”]

• Like many periodicals for children, the Gem printed a column of letters from subscribers—more than a few praising the paper.

• Premiums and advertisements were an essential part of the readers’ experience: about an eighth of the Gem is devoted to subscribing and to the wonderful premiums available; two pages of the Gem’s Nov 1873 eight-page issue are thus filled. Each newspaper advertisement included the information that a chromolithograph would be sent to every subscriber.

relevant quotes:

• Hyperbole seems to have been the Gem’s lifeblood: it is described in one advertisement as being “read every month by upwards of 250,000 persons. Its proprietors have just erected a new building for an office, and have added many improvements, making it one of the most complete printing offices in the country.” [“Young Folks’ Gem.” Chase County Courant] The Gem did, indeed, include “Monthly Circulation, 250,000” above its advertising rates in issues for 1874. A circulation of 250,000 is a distinct increase in the number of issues printed per month in Nov 1873, which was a paltry 60,000. [“Our Circulation 60,000.” Nov 1873; p. 4]

• Secondary pieces—and editorial comments in issues of the Gem—speak to a certain amount of insecurity about the editor’s honesty. The statement of the number of copies per month printed of the Gem in Nov 1873 was attested to by a notary public, the document being reprinted in the Gem. [“Our Circulation 60,000”] “A correspondent of the Medina Gazette,” one paper points out (the Gem was published in Medina County, Ohio), “pronounces the Young Folks’ Gem, published at Wadsworth by one Geo. C. Bennett, an unmitigated humbug.” [“Fragments: A correspondent”] This morsel would seem to be part of an unusual advertising campaign, given that the Gem actually asks “Are our Premiums a Swindle?” in its Nov 1873 issue: “The large value of our premiums surprise some persons; they even think there Must be a deception.” (The piece explains that manufacturers were so thrilled to have their products featured as the Gem’s premiums that they sent only the highest quality merchandise.) But hints that subscribers to the Gem were being swindled persisted and were actually addressed in the pages of the paper: “A Certain Little One says that we are very careful to ‘keep beyond the reach of the law.’ It is because we are careful to tell the truth, and thus need have no fears of the law. We can prove every assertion we have made, and time will soon disclose the fiat of fate that awaits them.” [Dec 1874; p. 4.] Clark several times printed “References” who would attest to his honesty.

• More than one newspaper addressed problems with the Gem, mostly with its premiums. The Richwood Gazette: “There is a swindling establishment, in Sharon Center, from which a small paper in pamphlet form is issued, called the ‘Young Folks Gem,’ printed monthly. A copy of it is sent to some little girl in a place, containing a prospectus, in which it is proposed to send each subscriber, at 25¢ per year, a handsome chromo, called ‘Little Daisy,’and offering prizes of considerable value for clubs of different sizes. The little girl then raises a club of other little girls and sends on the money to find that they have been swindled. Look sharp for ‘Little daisy.’ ” [“A Swindle”] The Highland Weekly: “Young Folks Gem is the title of a small monthly …. Profuse in promises of premiums, it is swindlingly slack in fulfillment. Specifications in proof if demanded, and editors would do well to warn against a plundering concern, playing upon the confidence of children. So writes our Sinking Springs correspondent, and we publish for the benefit of the public.” [“Young Folks Gem.” The Highland Weekly]

• The editor of the Gem hit back at some critics: “The Public should bear in mind that the Gem is the oldest child’s paper published in this region of the country, and that all others in this locality were started as money-making speculations. Remember, too, that a majority of them were started, and are now conducted, by parties discharged from the Gem office as incompetent. These facts furnish their own condlusions.” [Jan 1875; p. 4.]

• Harry Allen remembered his own unpleasant experience with the Gem’s premiums: “To-day I received a circular from the proprietor of the Young Folks’ Gem, a little paper pretended to be published by John A. Clark, Wadsworth, Ohio. He wants subscribers. I suppose he has sent one to other little folks in Waterloo besides myself. And before they send him any money, I wish … to tell them my experience with this Gem. Nearly two years ago I received a similar circular offering to the one getting up a club, as a premium, a set of carpenter tools, and to each subscriber a picture called ‘Little Daisy.’ I thought it would be nice to get the paper, picture and premium, so I went to work among my little friends and got 14 names which I sent with the money to the proprietor of the Gem. A little after I got up another club of sixteen or eighteen, and sent the names and money as before. After waiting a long time I received as the premium for my first club a few diminutive tools made of bass wood and tin, not worth a cent for use and costing, may be, ten cents. I also received the picture for each member of the first club, which I delivered to them. Several weeks after I received as a premium for the second club a small magnifying glass, but the pictures for the second club were never sent, and the paper was never sent to either of the clubs. I wrote to Mr. Clark several times asking him to send the papers and pictures that had been promised and paid for, but he paid no attention to my request. … I got my Pa to write Mr. Clark for me, but he had no better success than I. Now I hope no little girl or boy will get so badly fooled by the Young Folks’ Gem as I and my young friends have been.”

source of information: NUC; AAS catalog; OCLC; AASHistPer; notices, etc., below

available: AASHistPer, series 5

bibliography:

• “Fragments: A correspondent.” The Summit County Beacon [Akron, Ohio] 12 Nov 1873; p. 3.

• “A Swindle.” Richwood Gazette [Richwood, Ohio] 15 Jan 1874; p. 3.

• “Young Folks Gem.” The Highland Weekly News [Hillsboro, Ohio] 22 Jan 1874; p. 3.

• “The Young Folks’s Gem.” Chase County Courant [Cottonwood Falls, Kansas] 4 Dec 1874; p. 1.

• “The Young Folks’s Gem.” Carlisle Weekly Herald [Carlisle, Pennsylvania] 3 Dec 1874; p. 3.

• advertisement. The Missouri Granger [Macon, Missouri] 2 Feb 1875; p. 5.

• “We have received No. 1. of the fourth volume.” The Alamance Gleaner [Graham, North Carolina] 30 Nov 1875; p. 3.

• Harry Allen. “Young Folks’ Gem.” The Courier [Waterloo, Iowa] 29 Dec 1875; p. 8.

• “The Young Folks’ Gem, as revised and improved.” The North Alabamian [Tuscumbia, Alabama] 24 Nov 1876; p. 3.

• “Boys and girls are wanted.” New Ulm Review [New Ulm, Minnesota] 13 Dec 1882; p. 3.

The Laurel Wreath ; 1872?-after 1874

edited by: William Worth Dowling, 1874

published: Indianapolis, Indiana: William Worth Dowling.

frequency: quarterly

description: 1874, 16 pp.; price, 8¢

• 1874 is vol 3. Jan 1874 is vol 3 #1; April 1874 is vol 3 #2; July 1874 is vol 3 #3; Oct 1874 is vol 3 #4.

relevant information:

• Dowling is listed as the editor of the Wreath in a news article in May 1875. [“Elder W. W. Dowling.”]

• The Wreath was “filled with Exercises for Sunday-school Concerts and Exhibitions.” [advertising page. Oct 1874; p. 58]

• Religious focus

source of information: AAS catalog; “Elder W. W. Dowling”; AASHistPer

available: AASHistPer, series 5 (1874 issues only)

bibliography:

• “Elder W. W. Dowling.” The Cincinnati Daily Star [Cincinnati, Ohio] 21 May 1875; p. 1.

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