introduction not listed by title by place by editor by publisher by special subject covers
1789-1810 1811-1820 1821-1830 1831-1840 1841-1850 1851-1860 1861-1872

(Not really) American children’s periodicals, 1789-1872

The titles here have been listed in various articles, books, and bibliographies (including this one) as periodicals for children. They’re organized here in chronological order, with an explanation of why they’re not in the bibliography. A separate section is devoted to a few of the periodicals published by students at various schools.

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The Juvenile Olio ; 1802

edited by: “Amyntor”

published: Philadelphia, PA: David Hogan.

listed in:

• Harriet L. Matthews. “Children’s Magazines.” Bulletin of Bibliography. 1 (April 1899): 133-6.

• Frank Luther Mott. A History of American Magazines. New York: D. Appleton and Company, 1930. Vol. 1: 144.

Children’s Periodicals of the United States, ed. R. Gordon Kelly (Westport, CT & London, England: Greenwood Press, 1984).

not listed in this bibliography because: This is a prospectus for a collection of essays; Hogan printed it in the hope of attracting subscribers to the collection. I’ve found no indication that the collection was ever published.

Juvenile Mirror; or Educational Magazine ; 1811-1812

edited by: Albert Pickett

published: New York, NY: Smith & Forman, 1812; publishers at 195 & 213 Greenwich St.

description: March 1812: 72 pp.; page size, 5.75″ h x 3.75″ w.

• March issue is pp. 217-288

• Erroneously titled The Juvenile Monitor in several secondary sources.

source of information: APS reel 121; Lyon; NUC

available: APS II (1800-1850), reel 121 (missing parts 1-3); Early American Imprints, 2nd series #25766

listed in:

• Betty Longenecker Lyon. “A History of Children’s Secular Magazines Published in the United States from 1789-1899.” PhD diss. Johns Hopkins, 1942; pp. 39-43.

not listed in this bibliography because: This is a book on education which was published in parts; each part seems to have been bound in paper, each with the month of publication printed on the cover. The part microfilmed on the APS reel does, indeed, look like a magazine. The entire book is available on microcard as part of the Early American Imprints.

Juvenile Repository ; July 1811

published: Boston, MA: Armstrong?; subscriptions accepted at “Mr. ARMSTRONG’s Book-Store, No. 50, Cornhill, Boston ….” [1 (July 1811): 2]

description: Issued in parts of 36 pages each

relevant quotes: Introduction: “The Juvenile Repository is designed to afford entertainment and instruction to the children and youth of our country. Not much original matter will be expected in this work, but care will be exercised to make a selection of what is most useful, and best calculated “to make amusement and instruction friends. … [T]his book is as well calculated to be useful in schools as to afford entertainment in the private family. The six numbers when stitched together, or bound in boards or cheap binding, will be a very suitable book to introduce to all our country schools.” [1 (July 1811): 1-2]

• On the format: “This work was originally designed to go out in separate numbers—but by putting three numbers into a small volume with an index, it is thought, will render it more useful, especially, as a school book.” [in Welch]

source of information: APS reel 121

available: APS II (1800-1850), reel 121

listed in: d’Alte A. Welch. A Bibliography of American Children’s Books Printed Prior to 1821. Np: American Antiquarian Society & Barre Publishers, 1922.

not listed in this bibliography because: This is a book on education which was published in parts; each part seems to have been bound in paper, each with the month of publication printed on the cover.

The Parlour Companion; 4 Jan 1817-21 Aug 1819

published: Philadelphia, PA: T. G. Condie

frequency: monthly

continues: Juvenile Port-folio and Literary Miscellany ; 1812-1813

available: APS 1800-1850, reel 219

not listed in this bibliography because: This is a work for adults.

Olio ; 1822

edited: John H. Wood

published: Cincinnati, OH: Samuel S. Brooks & John H. Wood.

frequency: semimonthly

description: Page size, 10.5″ h

listed in: The Dawn 1 (1 July 1822): 34-35.

not listed in this bibliography because: This is a work for adults.

American Sunday-School Magazine; 1824-1832

available: APS 1800-1850, reel 305

not listed in this bibliography because: This is a work for adults.

Sabbath School Treasury ; July 1828-1851

edited by: 4th volume, Artemus Bullard

published: Boston, MA: T. R. Marvin, for the Massachusetts Baptist Sabbath School Union.

frequency: monthly

listed in: Harriet L. Matthews. “Children’s Magazines.” Bulletin of Bibliography. 1 (April 1899): 133-6.

not listed in this bibliography because: This is a work for adults.

New-Jersey Sabbath School Journal ; published during 1829

published: Princeton, NJ

listed in: OCLC

not listed in this bibliography because: This is a work for adults.

Illinois Sunday School Banner ; May 1832-Jan 1835?

edited by: John Mason Peck

published: Rock Spring, IL; published for the Illinois Sunday School Union.

frequency: monthly

description: 11″ h

• Temperance focus

• Religious focus

relevant quotes: In May 1833, Peck was described as still editing the Banner: “ … Mr. P. has for some months edited a monthly periodical, called ‘The Illinois Sunday School Banner,’—also a periodical in favor of temperance”. [“Anniversaries”; p. 269]

• The last issue may have been Jan 1835: “The Illinois Sunday School Banner has been discontinued for want of patronage. The last number contains the minutes of the annual meeting of the Illinois S. S. Union at Vandalia, Dec. 1834”. [“Sabbath Schools in Illinois”]

source of information: OCLC; “Anniversaries” “Sabbath Schools”

available: AASHistPer, series 2

bibliography:

• “Anniversaries Held in Boston, in May.” The American Baptist Magazine 13 (July 1833): 267-273.

• “Sabbath Schools in Illinois.” Christian Secretary 14 (28 Feb 1835): 28.

listed in: OCLC

not listed in this bibliography because: This is a work for adults, with a section for children.

Sunday School Journal and Advocate of Christian Education ; 24 Nov 1830-25 June 1834 • Sunday-School Journal ; 9 July 1834-15 Dec 1841 • Gazette of Education, and Sunday-school Journal ; 1841-1858 • Sunday School Times ; 1 Jan 1859-24 June 1967

published: Philadelphia, PA: American Sunday School Union, 1831-1858.

• 1 Jan 1859-24 June 1967: Philadelphia, PA: J. C. Garrigues.

• Also, Philadelphia, PA: J. D. Wattles; Philadelphia, PA: John S. Hart; Philadelphia, PA: John Wanamaker. New York, NY: n. p. All for the American Sunday-School Union.

frequency: weekly, 24 Nov 1830-25 June 1834

• semimonthly, 9 July 1834-15 Dec 1841

• weekly, 1 Jan 1859-24 June 1967

description: Newspaper format

• Vol 1-4 (1831-1834); new series vol 1-29 (1834-1858)

merged with: Gospel Herald to form Sunday School Times and Gospel Herald (for adults)

source of information: OCLC; ULS

removed from bibliography because: This is a work for adults.

The Boys’ Week-day Book; 1832

published: Philadelphia, PA: Thomas T. Ash.

listed in: Harriet L. Matthews. “Children’s Magazines.” Bulletin of Bibliography. 1 (April 1899): 133-6.

not listed in this bibliography because: This is a book.

The Sunday School Visiter ; 1835-Dec 1838 • Journal of Religious Education, and Family and Sunday-School Visiter ; Jan-Dec 1839 • Journal of Christian education, and Family and Sunday-School Visiter ; 1840-1842

edited by: Benjamin Peers & Benjamin Haight, 1839-1842

published: New York, NY: General Protestant Episcopal Sunday School Union.

frequency: monthly; 1 vol/ year

description: 1835-1838: Page size, 7″ h • 1839-1842: Page size, 9″ h

listed in: AAS catalog; OCLC

not listed in this bibliography because: This is a work for adults.

The Young Christian ; 4 Nov 1836-after 28 May 1837

published: Boston, MA: David Reed

frequency: weekly; friday

description: 4 pp.; page size, 14″ h

• At least 29 issues

• Religious focus: Unitarian

relevant information: This little publication was swamped by controversy; long (long) pieces by the editor and an alleged critic spotlight the difficulties of founding a denominational periodical.

• Contents of issues #1 and #29 were published in the Christian Register and Boston Observer.

source of information: AAS catalog; Reed; Whitman

available: AASHistPer, series 2

bibliography:

• Jason Whitman. “A New and Cheap Religious Paper.” Christian Register and Boston Observer 15 (4 June 1836): 91.

• “The Young Christian.” Christian Register and Boston Observer 15 (10 Sept 1836): 147.

• David Reed. “From the Proprietor and Publisher of the Register and Observer to the Editor.” Christian Register and Boston Observer 15 (1 Oct 1836): 159.

• David Reed. “The Young Christian.” Christian Register and Boston Observer 15 (15 Oct 1836): 166-167.

• Jason Whitman. Letter. Christian Register and Boston Observer 15 (19 Nov 1836): 186.

• Advertisement for #1. Christian Register and Boston Observer 15 (19 Nov 1836): 187.

• “The Young Christian.” Christian Register and Boston Observer 16 (27 May 1837): 83.

• Advertisement for #29. Christian Register and Boston Observer 16 (27 May 1837): 83.

listed in: AAS catalog; OCLC

not listed in this bibliography because: This is a work for adults.

Young People’s Library ; 1840-

edited by: B. Brierly

published: North Springfield, VT: B. Brierly

frequency: semimonthly

description: Page size, 9.75″ h

• Republication of religious works

listed in: AAS catalog

not listed in this bibliography because: This is a collection of small books being reprinted in cheap editions; a new title was made available every two weeks.

The Golden Rule ; 20 Aug 1841-5 April 1842

edited by: Mary Ann Brown

published: Albany, NY

frequency: semimonthly

description: Page size, 12″ h

listed in: here

not listed in this bibliography any more because: This is a work for adults.

Juvenile Repository ; 1842-1845

published: New York, NY

listed in: Children’s Periodicals of the United States, ed. R. Gordon Kelly. Westport, CT & London, England: Greenwood Press, 1984.

bibliography:

• Advertisement: “Books Just Received.” Charleston Gospel Messenger and Protestant Episcopal Register 21 (May 1844): 65.

• Advertisement: “Sunday School Books, For Sale at the Depository.” Charleston Gospel Messenger and Protestant Episcopal Register 22 (July 1845): 129.

• “General P. E. Sunday School Union.” Charleston Gospel Messenger and Protestant Episcopal Register 22 (Feb 1846): 343-344; mention on p. 344.

• “General Protestant Episcopal Sunday-School Union.” Episcopal Recorder 24 (24 Oct 1846): 126.

• Bishop Meade. “Errors Growing Out of High Views of Baptismal Regeneration.” Episcopal Recorder 25 (7 Aug 1847): 81.

not listed in this bibliography because: This is a book which may have been published in several editions.

Wreath ; 2 March 1842-1843

edited by: Mrs. C. L. Adams

published: Portland, ME: Brown Thurston.

frequency: weekly

description: Page size, 15.25″ h

listed in: AAS catalog

not listed in this bibliography because: This is a magazine for adults.

Judy ; 1846-1847?

published: New York, NY

listed in: Children’s Periodicals of the United States, ed. R. Gordon Kelly (Westport, CT & London, England: Greenwood Press, 1984).

not listed in this bibliography because: This is a humor magazine for adults.

The Daystar ; 3 Nov 1849-

published: Lowell, MA: printed by A. B. Wright.

frequency: monthly

description: Page size, 13″ h

• Published for the First Baptist Sabbath School

listed in: AAS catalog

not listed in this bibliography because: This is a magazine for adults.

The Gleaner ; 11 Aug 1849-

published: Newport, RI: George C. Mason & Co.

frequency: weekly

description: Page size, 13.75″ h • Newspaper format

listed in: AAS catalog; OCLC

not listed in this bibliography because: This is a magazine for adults.

A Word to the Little Folks ; 1849

published: Topsham, ME: J. White

description: Newspaper format

bibliography:

• S. N. D. North. History and Present Condition of the Newspaper and Periodical Press of the United States. Np: np, 1881; p. 379.

• Joseph Griffin, Ed. History of the Press of Maine. Brunswick, ME: np, 1872; p. 299: about A Word to the Little Flock.

listed in: North; p. 379

not listed in this bibliography because: This is a phantom title, a misprint of the title A Word to the Little Flock, a series of religious pamphlets for adults.

Young Folks’ Advocate ; July 1858-?

published: Utica, NY

frequency: monthly

listed in: S. N. D. North. History and Present Condition of the Newspaper and Periodical Press of the United States. Np: np, 1881; p. 399.

not listed in this bibliography because: The complete title apparently is Young Folks’ Advocate: Devoted to General Miscellany and Matrimonial Correspondence, which indicates that it was a work for adults.

Sunday School Journal ; June 1860?-Oct 1865 • Sunday School Journal for Teachers and Young People ; Oct 1865-May 1900 • Sunday School Journal for Teachers ; May-Sept 1900 • Sunday School Journal and Bible Student’s Magazine ; Oct 1900-1914 • The Sunday School Journal ; 1915-1925

published: New York, NY: Methodist Publishing House.

• Cincinnati, OH: Methodist Publishing House.

description: Religious focus: Methodist

continued by: Church School Journal

source of information: OCLC; ULS

available: AASHistPer, series 5

bibliography:

• “Sunday School Journal.” In Matthew Simpson. Cyclopaedia of Methodism, 5th rev. ed. Philadelphia: Louis H. Everts, 1883; p. 840. [google books]

listed in: here

not listed in this bibliography any more because: This is a magazine for adults.

Packard’s Monthly ; 1868-1870

listed in: Children’s Periodicals of the United States, ed. R. Gordon Kelly (Westport, CT & London, England: Greenwood Press, 1984).

not listed in this bibliography because: This is a work for adults.

Pictures and Stories ; 1870-

published: Nashville, TN

listed in:

Children’s Periodicals of the United States, ed. R. Gordon Kelly. Westport, CT & London, England: Greenwood Press, 1984.

not listed in this bibliography because: This is apparently a phantom title for Picture Lesson Paper • The Picture Story Paper (Jan 1870-1941).

Student publications

The Shepherdess ; 1831

published: New Britain, CT

description: 4 pp.; page size, octavo; 2 printed issues by October 1831

relevant quote: The editor of the Ladies’s Magazine took an opportunity to discuss the education of women: It was a “publication that deserves to be noticed for its modesty and singularity. … It is an octavo of four pages—entitled ‘The Shepherdess’—conducted by a society of Village Girls, of New Britain, Conn. for their social gratification and improvement. It seems they first circulated it in manuscript, but found the task of copying too arduous, and so gave it to the printer, (blessings on his art!) The two numbers we have seen are creditable to the taste and principles of these village maidens; feelings of delicacy and devotion mark the communications of the young, and there are encouraging letters and sentiments from several excellent ladies, Mrs. Cogswell, Mrs. Sigourney and others. We hope the plan, at least so far as forming social circles for improvement, will be extensively imitated. The female mind can never be perfected by schools and instructors. Women must do something for themselves, they must have some aim besides dress and display, lovers and parties. Let them once become zealous for their own moral and mental improvement, and this world of ours will soon bear a better and happier aspect.” [“Periodicals.”]

source of information: “Periodicals”

bibliography:

• “Periodicals.” Ladies’s Magazine 4 (Oct 1831): 479.

Juvenile Monthly ; Nov 1829

edited by: C. W. T. • H. H. D.

published: Amherst, MA: Mt. Pleasant Classical Institution, Nov 1829.

frequency: monthly

description: 32 pp.; page size, 8.5″ h

relevant quote: The editor of The American Monthly Magazine appears amused at receiving a copy of the magazine: “The ‘Juvenile Monthly’ (it will draw ruinously on your gingerbread funds, young masters,) is a fairly printed and pertly written affair, displaying some precocity, and a great deal of school-boy pedantry. We thank the Editor, (we hope his initials, C. W. T., do not stand for his weight,) for the compliment of an ‘Editor’s Table.’ Our best wish for him is, that he may not mistake its ‘green baize’ for ‘green boys.’ He may else find that authors and dogs are broken in alike—by whipping.” [“The Editor’s Table.” 1 (Jan 1830): 731]

source of information: OCLC

available: AASHistPer, series 2

bibliography:

• “The Editor’s Table.” The American Monthly Magazine 1 (Jan 1830): 731.

• “Literary Record.” Columbian Star and Christian Index 2 (2 Jan 1830): 12. [note: digitized version of American Periodical Series is illegible; if a print version is unavailable, perhaps microfilm version works better, with some squinting]