introduction not listed by title by place by editor by publisher by special subject covers
1789-1810 1811-1820 1821-1830 1831-1840 1841-1850 1851-1860 1861-1872

American children’s periodicals, 1821-1830

A newstand of American children’s periodicals, 1821-1830

This bibliography—with a detailed introduction—is available as an ebook from Barnes & Noble, Kobo, Apple, Scribd, 24symbols, and amazon.com.

[NOTES: Unless noted, page size is the size when trimmed, usually for binding; page size is approximate. Page size is described as height by width, thus: [measurement in inches]″ h x [measurement in inches]″ w

about frequency: semimonthly: twice a month (usually 24 issues per year); biweekly: every other week (usually 26 issues per year); bimonthly: every other month (usually 6 issues per year)

about availability: selections or complete issues available for free on the Internet, or available at libraries on microform or in databases

abbreviations:

APS, American Periodical Series (microfilm; also, digital database)

AAS, American Antiquarian Society, Massachusetts

AASHistPer, American Antiquarian Society Historical Periodicals (digital database; series 1-5)

Batsel, Union List of United Methodist Serials, 1773-1973, comp. John D. Batsel and Lyda K. Batsel (Evanston, Illinois: n.p., 1974)

NUC, National Union Catalog

OCLC, database available at many institutions via WorldCat (information may also be available in the NUC)

ULS, Union List of Serials in Libraries of the United States and Canada, ed. Winifred Gregory (New York, New York: H. W. Wilson Co., 1927)]

The Sunday Scholars’ Magazine; or, Monthly Reward Book ; Jan 1821

edited by: Joseph W. Ingraham

published: Boston, Massachusetts: Joseph W. Ingraham; publisher at 90 Court St.

frequency: monthly

description: 24 pp.; page size, 8.25″ h

• Probably never published; the specimen appears to have been published in 1821; the proposal also appeared in 1822 and 1823

• Religious focus

relevant quote: The Magazine was to be the republication of a London periodical: “The English publication of this useful and intertaining [sic] miscellany, commenced with January of the present year. Mr. Ingraham of this city has proposed republishing it for the benefit of our Sabbath Schools, and of our youth generally. It may be a sufficient recommendation of it, to repeat from the Prospectus, that ‘four editions of the first numbers have already been printed in England,’ and that ‘the work contains, in addition to religious essays and intelligence, occasional articles of plain information in sacred geography, national history, and other departments of useful knowledge, with many remarks showing the benefits and advantages of industry, contentment, cleanliness and economy.’ ” [“Sunday Scholar’s Magazine”]

source of information: OCLC; “Scholar’s Magazine”; notice

available: AASHistPer, series 2

bibliography:

• “The Scholar’s Magazine, or Monthly Reward Book.” Boston Recorder 7 (26 Oct 1822); p. 171.

• notice. Zion’s Herald 1 (5 Feb 1823); p. 18.

The Juvenile Repository ; 4 May 1822-28 June 1823

edited: H. Johnson; W. R. Moore

published: Lancaster, Pennsylvania: G. Guest & H. Johnson, the office of the Lancaster Journal

frequency: weekly: Saturday afternoon

description: $1/ year

relevant quote: Proposal: “The utility of a paper, devoted exclusively to miscellaneous literature, is so generally known and admitted, that it is deemed superfluous to say any thing on that subject. It is, however, a lamentable fact, that all attempts to establish, permanently, a work of that kind, in this place, have hitherto failed for the want of adequate encouragement. How far the publishers hereof may succeed in this, their first attempt, a little time will determine. Their intention is, by the assistance of a few literary friends, to render the Juvenile Repository useful, by the insertion of such original and selected essays as will have a tendency to afford both instruction and entertainment; and they respectfully invide their young literary friends, as also those of maturer age, to assist them in the commencement of an undertaking so arduous as that of conducting a work of this kind. That Lancaster affords a number of literary writers, is generally admitted—and were they to bestow a little of their time and talents towards the promotion of an object so praiseworthy, we doubt not ere long we should have a respectable literary journal established in this city. As it is the intention of the publishers not to give admission to political remarks and discussions, obscene tales or personal slander, they hope to render their paper interesting to all classes, particularly the fair reader, whose patronage is respectfully solicited.” [“Proposals”]

source of information: “Proposals”; notice; OCLC

bibliography:

• “Proposals by G. Guest & H. Johnson.” Lancaster Intelligencer [Lancaster, Pennsylvania] 29 March 1822; p. 3.

• notice. The Dawn 1 (17 June 1822); pp. 25-26.

• Edwin Charles Strohecker. “American Juvenile Literary Periodicals, 1789-1826.” PhD diss. Michigan, 1969.

The Literary Kaleidoscope ; 1822 (last issue, Sept)

edited: M. C. Hull

published: Wheeling, Virginia (now Wheeling, West Virginia)

frequency: monthly

description: 25¢/ year

source of information: Dawn

bibliography:

• notice. The Dawn 1 (17 June 1822); pp. 25-26.

• notice. The Dawn 1 (16 July 1822); p. 41.

• Edwin Charles Strohecker. “American Juvenile Literary Periodicals, 1789-1826.” PhD diss. Michigan, 1969.

The Dawn ; 1 May-1 Oct, 1 Nov 1822

cover/masthead: 1822

edited by: Lewis Wilson

published: Wilmington, Delaware: Lewis Wilson; publisher at 105 Market St.

frequency: 1 May-1 Oct, semimonthly; 1 Nov, monthly

description: 1 May-1 Oct, 8 pp.; 1 Nov, 12 pp.; page size, 10.75″ h x 6.5″ w; price, 75¢/ year

relevant information: Wilson’s father published two newspapers

relevant quotes:

• Introduction: “In presenting to the public the first number of the Dawn, it is deemed necessary to set forth the object in view; and considering the youth of the editor, it becomes doubly so. The object of our paper is to afford the youth of this Borough and vicinity, an opportunity of bringing into action those latent talents which the editor is well persuaded too often remain uncultivated, for want of a publication of this kind. The importance and utility of such a publication must be evident to every reflecting mind. It will be the means of exciting an emulation for literary superiority; thus bringing into action, talents which otherwise might have long lain dormant; thereby preparing us for the occupancy of stations in life, to which we may in our maturer years be called.” [1 (1 May 1822); p. 1]

• Wilson began the magazine when an amateur publication was failing: “[T]he editors of the “Juvenile Gazette’ were becoming weary of their vocation—the paper was dwindling into nothingness, and they were about relinquishing it entirely …. We beheld the dawn of genious [sic] about to be smothered, and our fellow-youth destitute [o]f a suitable opportunity of exercising their talents and bringing their views to light; thus, in all probability, depriving our country of the services of men who might be her brightest ornaments.” [“Address to Our Readers,” 1 (1 Nov 1822); p. 89] (The Gazette was a traditional amateur paper with limited subscribership, since only one copy of an issue was created: “The communications when written were forwarded to the Editor, who transcribed them upon a sheet of paper, and when done, it was handed round among the members for perusal, and finally to the Editor for preservation.” [Dawn 1 (1 May 1822); p. 3] There were 41 issues. [Dawn 1 (17 June 1822); p. 26])

• Launching a periodical was financially precarious: “Postmasters at a distance, and persons in our immediate neighborhood who hold subscription papers for the “Dawn ” are respectfully solicited to forward them to the Editor immediately. The subscription is yet too small to defray the expense of publication, and we are anxious to know our fate; whether we shall be the means of cultivating and enlightening the minds of the youth of Delaware, or whether they shall be permitted to grope their way in ignorance.” [1 (1 May 1822); p. 2]

• Publishing a periodical was financially perilous: “More than three Months have elapsed since the commencement of this publication, and already are our prospects of future usefulenss, and the anticipated splendor of the DAWN, becoming clouded by many difficulties which we (thoughtless youth) little expected to encounter. Just as we imagined our efforts to eradicate the demon IGNORANCE from the minds of our fellow-youth, by endeavoring to instil into them a love of reading, and “a desire to excel in composition,” and were about realizing as we vainly supposed, the fulfilment of our expectations, the idea occurred to us to “sit down and count the cost ” of our establishment. We did so—and notwithstanding we made a calculation of our expenses previous to our undertaking, we fell infinitely short of what they really are. The reason of this was because we calculated too largely upon the increase of our subscription list, and though it has accumulated one third since the commencement, it is yet too small to defray the actual expense. It is not our intention to enter into a detail of the merits (if it has any) of the publication;—it has been before my fellow-youth long enough for them to determine whether it is worth patronizing or not—whether they will endeavor to obtain more subscribers, and thereby prevent its descending below the horizon, which must inevitably take place at the expiration of three Months, unless a sufficient increase of patronage is received.” [“An Appeal to Our Reader,” 1 (16 Aug 1822); p. 57]

• Concluding: publishing could be financially and socially disastrous: “Flushed with the idea of success, we pursued ‘the even tenor of our way’ for the space of three Months, when we sat down to count the cost of our establishment—found that it exceeded our income—addressed our readers on the subject—and although our subscription list has increased since, it is yet too small to defray the expense, and the Dawn which we once anticipated would shine forth in its meridian splendor, has descended below the horizon, adding another to the already numerous instances of the folly of depending upon the assistance of those who flatter in the time of prosperity, but in the hour of adversity will desert you, and leave you to drag out a miserable existance [sic] in penury, want and starvation. We are determined that this shall not be the case with us, and will therefore abandon that which would in time, lead to this direful condition. … To all our readers we wish happiness and prosperity—may they shun the paths of vice, and cultivate every virtue that is calculated to render them ornaments to society in this world, and prepare them for a blessed immortality in the world to come.” [“Address to Our Readers” 1 (1 Nov 1822); pp. 89-90]

source of information: APS reel 100; Strohecker

available: APS II (1800-1850), reel 100

bibliography: Edwin Charles Strohecker. “American Juvenile Literary Periodicals, 1789-1826.” PhD diss. Michigan, 1969.

Juvenile Museum ; 16 Ninth month (16 Sept) 1822-27 Ninth month (27 Sept) 1823

edited by: Horton J. Howard

published: Mt. Pleasant, Ohio: Ezekiel Harris & Co. Printed: Elisha Bates

frequency: 16 Ninth month (Sept) 1822-1 Second month (Feb) 1823, semimonthly; 1 Third month (March)-27 Ninth month (Sept), monthly; 1 vol/ year

description: 16 Ninth month (Sept) 1822-1 Second month (Feb) 1823, 8 pp.; 1 Third month (March)-27 Ninth month (Sept), 16 pp. • Price, 50¢/ year; page size, 6″ h x 4″ w

relevant quote: Prospectus: Published by “The Seminary Range Literary Association. The object of the editors is to present a sheet of innocent and interesting matter, for the improvement of the Junior Class of Society, of both sexes.” (in Dawn)

source of information: AASHistPer, series 2; Strohecker; AAS catalog; OCLC

available: AASHistPer, series 2

bibliography:

• notice. The Dawn 1 (2 Sept 1822); p. 65.

• Edwin Charles Strohecker. “American Juvenile Literary Periodicals, 1789-1826.” PhD diss. Michigan, 1969.

Youth’s Instructer and Guardian ; 1823-1828 • Youth’s Instructor and Sabbath School Assistant ; 1829 • Youth’s Instructor and Sabbath School and Bible Class Assistant ; 1830-1832

published: New York, New York: N. Bangs & T. Mason for Methodist Episcopal Church, 1825; printed by Azor Hoyt.

• New York, New York: J. Emory & B. Waugh, for the Methodist Episcopal Church, April 1830-March 1831; printed by J. Collord

frequency: monthly • 1830: 1 vol/ year; volume begins with April issue

description: 1825, 1830: 36 pp.; page size, 6 7/8″ h x 4″ w. Price, 1827-1828: $1/ year; $1.25 “half bound in calf”

• New series, vol 1 (1829); vol 2, numbers 1-12 (April 1830-March 1831)

• Religious focus: Methodist

relevant information:

• At first, issues where paid for by the minister of each church, who distributed them to subscribers. In 1828, publishers began to deal with subscribers directly.

• Information about the contents is available from other sources, especially the Christian Advocate:

• table of contents for 1826: Christian Advocate (1 [18 Nov 1826]; pp. 42-43)

• April 1827 issue: Christian Advocate (1 [31 March 1827]; p. 119)

• June 1827 issue: Zion’s Herald (5 [13 June 1827]; p. 95)

• Aug 1827 issue: Zion’s Herald (5 [8 Aug 1827]; p. 127)

• Jan 1828 issue: Christian Advocate (2 [28 Dec 1827]; p. 67)

• March 1830 issue: Christian and Journal and Zion’s Herald 4 (5 March 1830); p. 107

• The number of copies sent to various locations was printed in 1828 [Christian Advocate 3 (5 Sept 1828); p. 3].

relevant quotes:

• The work was intended for older children: “The Youth’s Instructer and Guardian may be introduced into Sunday schools, for the benefit of larger scholars, as a reading and reward book ….” [Prospectus. The Child’s Magazine 1 (July 1827): inside front cover (cover page 2)]

• It was “designed for the instruction and entertainment of the rising generation. Its plan comprehends Scripture Biography; Memoirs of Young Persons; Juvenile Obituaries; Familiar Essays; Dialogues, or Narratives, on Religious[,] Moral, and Miscellaneous subjects; Anecdotes; brief Historical Compilations; Extracts from interesting Books of Travels, &c.; Articles of Natural History and Philosophy; Juvenile Letters; and Poetry, original and selected.” [advertisement. The Child’s Magazine 1 (July 1827): back cover; cover p. 4]

• In 1829, the Instructer broadened its focus: “It is intended in future, as the altered title imports, to introduce into this work a regular sabbath school department. This is designed not merely for the benefit of the scholars, but especially also for the teachers, superintendents, and visiters, as a true and general Sabbath School Assistant.” [“Youth’s Instructer and Guardian.” 12 Dec 1828]

continued by: Youth’s Magazine: A Monthly Miscellany (New York, New York; May 1838-April 1841)

source of information: 1825 vol; April 1830-March 1831 vol; Child’s Magazine; AAS catalog; Batsel

available: AASHistPer, series 2

bibliography:

• “Youth’s Instructer and Guardian.” Christian Advocate 1 (18 Nov 1826); pp. 42-43.

• “Methodist Magazine.” Christian Advocate and Journal 1 (31 March 1827); p. 119.

• “Youth’s Instructer and Guardian.” Christian Advocate and Journal 1 (31 March 1827); p. 119.

• “Youth’s Instructer and Guardian.” Zion’s Herald 5 (13 June 1827); p. 95.

• “Youth’s Instructer and Guardian.” Zion’s Herald 5 (8 Aug 1827); p. 127.

• “Youth’s Instructer and Guardian.” Christian Advocate 2 (28 Dec 1827); p. 67.

• “The Methodist Magazine, and the Youth’s Instructer and Guardian.” Christian Advocate and Journal and Zion’s Herald 3 (5 Sept 1828); p. 3.

• “Youth’s Instructer and Guardian.” Christian and Journal and Zion’s Herald 3 (12 Dec 1828); p. 59.

• “A Good Example.” Christian and Journal and Zion’s Herald 4 (11 Dec 1828); p. 59.

• “Youth’s Instructer.” Christian and Journal and Zion’s Herald 4 (5 March 1830); p. 107.

The Sabbath School Repository and Teacher’s Assistant ; Jan-Dec 1823

edited by: E. B. Coleman

published: New Haven, Connecticut: E. B. Coleman, 1823.

frequency: monthly

description: 24 pp.; price, 50¢ or 75¢/ year

• Religious focus

relevant quotes:

• The price of the Repository depended on whether or not the subscriber also took the Guardian, which Coleman also edited: “The Repository will contain one sheet of 25 pages per month, to be stitched with the Guardian, or in printed covers by itself, as subscribers shall wish. When united with the Guardian it will enhance the price of that work fifty cents; but when stitched by itself the price will be seventy-five cents in advance, or one dollar payable in six months from the first of January; and to individuals or companies who shall pay for ten sets in advance, to be sent in one bundle, the price will be reduced to fifty cents.” [“Sabbath School Repository” Religious Intelligencer Dec 1822]

• On the focus: “It is stated that the work ‘will contain choice selections from several valuable English Sabbath School Magazines, and also whatever is interesting respecting Sabbath Schools in our country.’ We should be gratified at seeing the work gradually assume more of an original character, as in this way it would, both with Teachers and their pupils, possess a greater interest. Short biographical sketches of pious children, who have been connected with the different schools in which the work is taken, could hardly fail of being highly useful.” [“Sabbath School Repository” Religious Intelligencer 19 April 1823]

• On the close of the magazine:

Number Twelve! sure enough—our First Volume’s complete.

Then on such an occasion ’tis certainly meet

We should take a respectful farewell of our friends,

With thanks that their favour our efforts attends.”

[“Number Twelve.” 1 (Dec 1823); p. 286]

• The ending of the magazine was noted in 1824: “The Editor of the ‘Sabbath School Repository’ has been induced to relinquish the publication of this interesting little work; not having a sufficient patronage to remunerate him for his labor. This must be regretted by those who were acquainted with the merits of the Repository.” [notice.]

source of information: APS reel 205; Intelligencer; Miscellany

available: AASHistPer, series 2 • APS II (1800-1850), reel 205

bibliography:

• “Sabbath School Repository.” The Religious Intelligencer 7 (7 Dec 1822); p. 448.

• “The Guardian and Sabbath School Repository.” The Pittsburgh Recorder 2 (7 Feb 1823); p. 39.

• “Sabbath School Repository.” The Religious Intelligencer 7 (19 April 1823); p. 746.

• “Sabbath School Repository.” The Religious Miscellany 1 (25 April 1823); p. 220.

• “Sabbath School Repository.” The Religious Miscellany 1 (16 April 1823); p. 269.

• notice. The Religious Miscellany 2 (16 Jan 1824); p. 412.

The Monitor ; Jan 1823-Dec 1824

edited: H. Wilbur

frequency: monthly; 1 vol/ year

published: Boston, Massachusetts: Cummings, Hilliard, & Co., Jan 1823-Dec 1824.

description: 36 pp.; large duodecimo; page size, 7″ h x 4″ w. Price: $1/ year, if paid in advance; $1.25, if not paid in advance

• Intended for “youths over 15 years of age” [prospectus; 1823 vol]

• The first issue (Jan 1823) was reprinted at least twice.

relevant quotes:

• The Monitor was intended for slightly older readers: “The work is intended for an older class of readers than those who will be interested in the Guardian, or the Sunday School Magazine, and is not intended to interfere with either of those publications. We were much gratified when the design of the Monitor was announced in the Prospectus; for we saw that it was calculated to fill up an important deficiency in our system of religious instruction. A good degree of attention has always been paid to the religious education of children, so long as they are regarded as the proper subjects of catechetical instruction. … But when the child has become a youth, and the catechism is abandoned, the formation of his religious character has also been abandoned, and he has been left to the mere instructions of the sabbath.” [“Communication from a Pastor of a Pedobaptist Church in Boston.” Christian Watchman 4 (3 May 1823); p. 83]

• The merger with The Guardian was announced in Dec 1824: “Believing that important advantages would result from an union of the Monitor and Guardian, the Editors and Publishers of the two works have made arrangements for their union after the present volume. The particular excellencies of each plan will be retained and original articles from both the Editors will continue to be inserted. The terms will be the same as before, and subscribers to either will be considered as patrons of the united work, which will be issued monthly from Boston and New Haven, the first of the month.” [“Preface.” Monitor. 1824 bound volume]

merged with: The Guardian (Jan 1819-Dec 1824), to form The Guardian and Monitor ; 1825-1828

source of information: 1823-1824 vols

available: AASHistPer, series 2 • APS II (1800-1850), reel 143

bibliography:

• “Communication from a Pastor of a Pedobaptist Church in Boston.” Christian Watchman 4 (3 May 1823); p. 83.

• “The Guardian and Monitor.” The Religious Intelligencer 9 (1 Jan 1825); p. 489.

The Juvenile Magazine ; April 1823

edited by: William Biglow

published: Belfast, Maine: Ephraim Fellows & W. R. Simpson

frequency: monthly

description: 36 pp.; price: $1/ year

relevant information: Only one issue

source of information: Salem Gazette ; Williamson

bibliography:

• notice. Salem Gazette [Salem, Massachusetts] 29 April 1823; p. 2.

• Joseph Williamson. “The Press of Waldo County.” In History of the Press of Maine, ed. Joseph Griffin. Brunswick: 1872; p. 159. [archive.org]

Teacher’s Offering; or Sabbath’s Scholar’s Magazine ; Nov 1823-1824 • Teacher’s Offering; or Sunday Scholar’s Magazine ; 1825 • The Youth’s Friend, and Scholar’s Magazine ; 1826-after 1845

cover/masthead: 1831

edited by: Frederick A. Packard

published: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania: American Sunday School Union; 1829, publisher at 146 Chestnut St.

frequency: monthly

description: 16 pp.; 24mo; page size, 5.5″ h x 3.25″ w

• Prices: early 1825, 25¢/ year; late 1825: 1 copy, 37½¢/ year; 8 or more copies, 25¢/ year

• Circulation: 1825, Jan issue, 3000 (50 subscribers) [“American Sunday School Union” 1826] or 2,000 [“First Annual Report”; p. 163]; 1827, 10,000 [Mott; “American Sunday School Union” 1826]; 1828, 13,000 [“Youth’s Friend”]

• May 1828-May 1829, 157,000 copies published [“American S. S. Union.” 14 Sept 1830]

• 1 Jan 1825 is vol 2 #1

• Aug 1825 is whole #20 • Nov 1825 is whole #23

• Religious focus

relevant information:

• Contents for a few issues were printed in The National Gazette [Philadelphia, Pennsylvania]: Jan 1825 [“Just Published.” 11 Jan 1825] Nov 1825 [“Children’s Magazine.” 28 Oct 1825] June 1827 [“The Youth’s Friend, and Scholar’s Magazine for June 1827”]

• In Aug 1825, the first issues for 1825 were reprinted, due to demand. [“No. 20”]

relevant quotes:

• In 1824, the Offering was intended as a reward for children attending Sunday school: “It consists of addresses to children, Sabbath School fact, anecdotes, &c. The condition for receiving it is that the scholar, after he has been a member of the School three months average at least six verses at each recitation during the preceding month, and be punctual in his attendance unless he have a sufficient excuse for being late or absent. The effect produced by this little book in securing the punctuality and satisfying the wishes of the childen is very pleasing.—Indeed, it seems to have superseded almost entirely, the necessity of any other reward.” [“Teacher’s Offering”; p. 27]

• Circulation figures were published in 1826: “It was commenced in January 1825, with an edition of 3,000 copies, and less than 50 subscribers. In August of the same year the edition was increased to 5,000, and the back numbers were reprinted. In April of the present year, the edition was increased to 7,000, and subsequently, to 10,000. So rapid an increase of circulation, is a strong proof of the utility of the work.” [“Second Report”; p. 390]

• The American Journal of Education was most admiring: “The work is intended chiefly for Sunday schools; but it furnishes so much interesting and instructive matter, directly conducive to moral and religious improvement, that it is equally well adapted to the use of other schools and of families. The editing of this publication indicates, on the whole, much acquaintance with the disposition and habits of children, and a happy talent for engaging their attention, and impressing their minds. Every number of such a work, however, cannot be equally successful; and, in some, there seems to be too large a proportion of doctrinal matter. But the guidance of attentive parents [p. 128] and teachers, will enable children to obtain from the whole much valuable instruction.” [“Notices.” Feb 1827]

source of information: 1829-1838, scattered bound volumes; OCLC; AAS catalog; notices, etc., below; Scharf; Mott; Kelly

available: AASHistPer, series 2

bibliography:

• “The Teacher’s Offering.” The Religious Intelligencer 9 (12 June 1824); pp. 26-27.

• “New Haven Sabbath School Union.” Boston Recorder 9 (19 June 1824); p. 99.

• “Just Published.” The National Gazette [Philadelphia, Pennsylvania] 11 Jan 1825; p. 3.

• “First Annual Report of the American Sunday School Union.” The American Sunday School Magazine June 1825; pp. 161-172.

• “No. 20, The Teacher’s Offering; or, Sunday Scholar’s Magazine, for August.” The National Gazette [Philadelphia, Pennsylvania] 2 Aug 1825; p. 3.

• “Children’s Magazine.” The National Gazette [Philadelphia, Pennsylvania] 28 Oct 1825; p. 3.

• “American Sunday School Union.” Christian Watchman 9 June 1826; p. 3.

• “American Sunday School Union. Second Report.” The Missionary Herald 22 (Dec 1826); pp. 390-392.

• “Notices.” American Journal of Education 2 (Feb 1827); pp. 127-128.

• “The Youth’s Friend, and Scholar’s Magazine for June 1827.” The National Gazette [Philadelphia, Pennsylvania] 29 May 1827; p. 3.

• “Periodical Works for Children.” American Journal of Education 2 (Dec 1827); p. 750. online

• “Youth’s Friend, and Scholar’s Magazine.” The American Sunday School Magazine Jan 1828; p. 19.

• “Sunday Schools No. 2.” Eastern American [Castine, Maine] 1 (9 April 1828); p. 1.

• “American Sunday School Union.” The National Gazette [Philadelphia, Pennsylvania] 27 May 1829; p. 2.

• “The Youth’s Friend, and Scholar’s Magazine.” The Religious Intelligencer 14 (19 Sept 1829); p. 272.

• “American S. S. Union.” Vermont Watchman and State Gazette [Montpelier, Vermont] 24 (14 Sept 1830; p. 1.

Longworth’s American Almanac, New-York Register, and City Directory. New York: Thomas Longworth, 1837; p. 708. [google books]

Doggett’s New-York City Directory for 1845 & 1846, 4th ed. New York; p. John Doggett, Jr., 1845; p. 430. [google books]

• “Sunday-Schools and the American Sunday-School Union.” The American Journal of Education 41 (Dec 1865); pp. 709, 715.

• J. Thomas Scharf and Thompson Westcott. History of Philadelphia, 1609-1884. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; p. L. H. Everts & Co., 1884; vol 3, p. 1989. [google books]

• Frank Luther Mott. A History of American Magazines. New York: D. Appleton and Company, 1930. Vol. 1; p. 144.

Children’s Periodicals of the United States, ed. R. Gordon Kelly. Westport, Connecticut & London, England: Greenwood Press, 1984.

Sabbath School Visitant ; June 1824-1828

published: Utica, New York: N.p.; printed by Merrell & Colwell, 1824-1826.

frequency: 1824-1827: monthly; 1 vol/ year

• Dec 1824 and Feb 1825 had two issues (15 & 25 Dec; 15 & 24 Feb): “Our patrons cannot have regretted more deeply than ourselves, the necessity of our having been compelled, for the last three months, to publish two numbers in one. It arose from the fact of our devoting more time to the work than was originally intended, by which means, we trust, it has been made more useful.” [1 (Feb 1825); p. 92]

• 1828: biweekly

description: June 1824-Aug 1825, 8 pp. • Sept 1825, 20 pp.

• Circulation: 1827, 900 copies/ month

• Religious focus

relevant quote: On the increase in pages and the change from a monthly to a biweekly periodical: “[W]hen the Visitant was first commenced, so little interest was felt in our neighborhood, in regard to Sunday Schools, that many of our friends imagined we had given ourselves to a visionary undertaking. But, during the interval between the publication of our first number and the close of the second volume, the appetite for Sunday School intelligence had so much increased, while interesting intelligence in the mean time was pouring in upon us and accumulating upon our hands, that we were obliged to enlarge the Visitant to twice its original size. When, two years ago, this enlargement became necessary, the schools fo the Western Union numbered about ten thousand pupils; our schools now number more than thirty thousand.” Thus, “We are far … from supposing ourselves premature in this change. Indeed, we do not keep pace with the wants of the public.” [“Sabbath School Visitant.” The Religious Intelligencer 19 Jan 1828]

merged with: The Juvenile Magazine (1827-1828) to form Sabbath School Visitant and Juvenile Magazine (1829)

source of information: APS reel 1124; NUC

available: APS II (1800-1850), reel 1124

bibliography:

• “Western Sunday School Union.” Vermont Chronicle [Bellows Falls, Vermont] 2 Nov 1827; p. 2.

• “Western Sunday School Union.” The Religious Intelligencer 12 (10 Nov 1827); p. 370.

• “Circular: To the Churches Within the Limits of the Western Sabbath School Union.” Western Recorder 4 (18 Dec 1827).

• “Sabbath School Visitant.” The Religious Intelligencer 12 (19 Jan 1828); pp. 539-540.

• “Sabbath School Visitant.” Western Recorder 7 (19 Jan 1830); p. 10.

The Moral and Religious Repository, or Youth’s Christian Monitor (also The Moral and Religious Repository, and Youth’s Christian Monitor; Youth’s Christian Monitor) ; 9 July 1824-

cover/masthead: 1824

published: Montrose, Pennsylvania: J. Catlin.

frequency: semi-monthly

description: 16 pp.; page size, 8.5″ h; price, $1/ year: “Subscribers must pay for six months in advance, in cash; and when any one is in arrears the paper will not be forwarded.” [“New Publication”]

• Religious focus

relevant quote:

• The editor’s intention: “When a new publication is laid before the public, it is expected that the design of the work and the inducements which prompted it, be made known at the commencement. the Editor would therefore briefly state—that the object of this publication is, to disseminate religious intelligence, and to instil into the minds of the rising generation the exalted principles of Morality and Religion—to admonish them to imitate the virtues of the good, and to flee the vices of the licentious—and to point the way to ‘another an a better world,’ through the medium of a Saviour. The benevolent efforts of the Missionaries of the present day form one of the most interesting items of intelligence to a Christian people.… The various institutions, therefore, for promoting the spread of the gospel at home and abroad, and also narratives of revivals of religion, will claim a share of attention in the Repository. In no case will this work be the medium of controversial subjects, but will lend its influence to promote the practice of the several christian virtues, and to further the cause of benevolent exertions.…nor will it be exclusively devoted to any particular sect of christians. Should the Repository meet with encouragement that would warrant its continuance for a length of time, the editor will spare no pains to render it interesting and useful.… to enable him to do this, he humbly hopes that HE who is mighty, will strengthen his hand to prosecute this important design. Well written essays, adapted to the nature of the publication, are respectfully solicited.” [“Advertisement.” 1 (9 July 1824); p. 3]

source of information: AAS catalog

available: AASHistPer, series 2

bibliography:

• “New Publication.” The Susquehanna Democrat [Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania] 27 Aug 1824; p. 4.

The Youth’s Friend [El amigo de la juventud] ; May 1825

edited by: Felix Varela

published: New York

relevant information: bilingual: English and Spanish; “Catholic Historical Notes” says it was published in Spanish and French

source of information: McCadden; “Catholic Historical Notes”

bibliography:

• prospectus. Truth Teller 1 (14 May 1825).

• “Catholic Historical Notes.” The American Historical Researches 21 (Jan 1904); p. 38.

• Joseph and Helen McCadden. Father Varela: Torch Bearer from Cuba. United States Catholic Historical Society Monograph Series #27. New York: United States Catholic Historical Society, 1969; pp. 75-76.

The Guardian and Monitor ; Jan 1825-Dec 1828

cover/masthead: 1825, 1828

edited: E. B. Coleman; H. Wilbur

published: New Haven, Connecticut: Nathan Whiting, 1825-1827.

frequency: monthly: 1st week of the month

description: 36 pp.; page size, 6 7/8″ h x 4″ w

• Price, 1825-1826: $1/ year, in advance; $1.25/ year, paid after three months

• 1825 marked “New series,” vol 7

relevant quotes:

• “The Guardian which has been published at this office for several years, and the Monitor which has been published in Boston, by the Rev. Mr. Wilber. [sic] are to be unified and published at this office.—We have no doubt this union will improve the work. It will be better adapted to the taste of youth of a more advanced age, and to all who are desirous of intellectual and moral improvement.” [“The Guardian and Monitor.”]

• Whiting offered to relinquish the Guardian in 1828: “The subscriber, being engaged in other publications, offers to dispose the establishment of the Guardian [and] Monitor, after the close of the present year. It has a respectable list of subscribers, and might be greatly increased by proper attention.” [“Worthy of Notice.” The Religious Intelligencer 12 (18 Aug 1827); p. 192]

• Finances did in the Guardian and Monitor: “This little journal had its commencement … early, when publications of the kind were rare and undertaken as novel experiments. … Commencing as it did with this reading and publishing age, and being, as it were, pioneer to the army of similar works that have risen up and followed on, during the ten years last past, the editor has hesitated long in dropping it. It is not now done so much for want of patronage, as from want of profit—or rather loss of profit. Formerly, when too the sources of intelligence and reading for enriching its columns were not one tenth of what they now are, the work enjoyed the flattering patronage of more than seven thousand subscribers. And now, though the patronage is much divided, as it of right should be, it has subscribers enough to warrant almost any other work in proceeding. The secret of its failure is briefly told:—The price of the work, though illustrated by cuts and stitched in the pamphlet form, was $1 or $1 25: and that collected by paying double or treble postage—or employing a travelling agent.” [“To Our Patrons” 507]

continues: The Guardian, or Youth’s Religious Instructor ; Jan 1819-Dec 1824 • The Monitor ; Jan 1823-Dec 1824

source of information: 1826 vol; Feb 1828 issue; APS 112 & 881

available: AASHistPer, series 2 • APS II (1800-1850), reel 112 & 881

bibliography:

• “The Guardian and Monitor.” The Religious Intelligencer 9 (1 Jan 1825); p. 489.

• notice. Western Recorder 2 (25 Jan 1825); p. 15.

• “The Guardian and Monitor.” The Religious Intelligencer 10 (11 Feb 1826); pp. 582-583.

• “Worthy of Notice.” The Religious Intelligencer 12 (18 Aug 1827); p. 192.

• “To Our Patrons.” The Religious Intelligencer 13 (3 Jan 1829); pp. 507-508.

• John B. Crume. “Children’s Magazines, 1826-1857.” Journal of Popular Culture 7 (1973); pp. 698-706.

Children’s Friend ; Jan 1826-1827?

published: Albany, New York: Webster & Wood.

• Albany, New York: E. & E. Hosford, Feb-Sept 1827.

frequency: monthly

description: 24 pp; page size, 4.25″ h x 2.5″ w • Feb 1826, 32 pp.

relevant quote: “We earnestly hope a more particular attention will be paid to the introduction of the American Sabbath School Teacher’s Magazine, the Youth’s Friend and the Children’s Friend. The effect of these works from their known character may be easily estimated.” [“Eighth Annual Report”]

relevant information: The title may be incorporated into that of the The Sabbath School Messenger, and Children’s Friend (Oct 1828-Sept 1829?), also published in Albany.

source of information: Jan 1826 issue; OCLC

bibliography:

• “The Children’s Friend.” Western Recorder 3 (21 March 1826); p. 49.

• advertisement. Western Recorder 4 (24 April 1827); p. 67.

• “The Eighth Annual Report of the Albany County Sabbath School Union Society.” Albany Argus [Albany, New York] 1 (19 Oct 1827); p. 1.

• “Periodical Works for Children.” American Journal of Education 2 (Dec 1827); p. 750. online

The Juvenile Miscellany ; Sept 1826-Feb 1836, April 1836

cover/masthead: 1827 | 1828 | 1829 | 1831 | 1835

edited by: 1826-Aug 1834, Lydia Maria Child

• Sept 1834-April 1836, Sarah Josepha Hale

published: Boston, Massachusetts: John Putnam, 1826-1827.

• Boston, Massachusetts: John Putnam and Wait, Greene, & Co., 1827-1828; Putnam at Marsh and Capen’s Bookstore, 362 Washington St.; Wait, Greene & Co., at 13 Court St. (May 1827; Jan 1828)

• Boston, Massachusetts: Putnam & Hunt, 1828-1831; Putnam & Hunt at 41 Washington St. (Jan & March 1829).

• Philadelphia, Pennsylvania: Thomas T. Ash, Jan & March 1829.

• Boston, Massachusetts: Carter, Hendee, & Babcock, Sept/Oct 1831.

• Boston, Massachusetts: Carter & Hendee, 1831-1834.

• Boston, Massachusetts: E. R. Broaders, 1834-1836; Broaders at 127 Washington St. (July 1835)

frequency: 1826-1834: bimonthly; 2 vol/ year. 1834-1836: monthly

description: 1826-1833, 108 pp.; duodecimo; page size, 5.75″ h x 3.25″ w; price $2/ year.

• 1835, 54 pp.; page size, 5.75″ h x 3.25″ w

• No March 1836 issue

• Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept 1826)-v. 4 (July 1828); new series, v. 1 (Sept 1828)-v. 6 (Aug 1831); 3d series, v. 1 (Sept 1831)-v. 6 (Aug 1834); 4th series, v. 1 (Sept 1834)-v. 3 (Dec 1836)

relevant quotes:

• In the first issue, the editor appeared a bit diffident: “[T]hough I have great affection for you, and the kindest interest in your welfare and improvement, perhaps I may not be always able to afford you amusement and instruction. I have, in some measure, forgotten what pleased me, when I was a child, and it is difficult for me to imagine how I should think or feel, if I were as young as you now are. You, my dear young friends, shall be my critics: What you find, neither affords you amusement or does you good, I shall think is badly written.” [“Address”; p. iv]

• Child’s farewell as editor: “After conducting the Miscellany for eight years, I am now compelled to bid a reluctant and most affectionate farewell to my little readers. May God bless you, my young friends, and impress deeply upon your hearts the conviction that all true excellence and happiness consists in living for others, not for yourselves. … I intend hereafter to write other books for your amusement and instruction; and I part from you with less pain, because I hope that God will enable me to be a medium of use to you, in some other form than the Miscellany.” [“Note”]

entertaining information:

• The Miscellany will be the preferred reading material of Annie in Nathaniel Hawthorne’s “Little Annie’s Ramble”: “Is Annie a literary lady? Yes; she is deeply read in Robin Carver’s tomes, and has an increasing love for fairy tales, though seldom met with now-a-days, and she will subscribe, next year, to the Juvenile Miscellany.” Annie is five years old in the story. [Youth’s Keepsake for 1835. Boston, Massachusetts: E. R. Broaders, 1834; p. 151]

• The Miscellany inadvertently provided material for at least the first issue of Every Youth’s Gazette (22 Jan-31 Dec 1842); the editor was open about why he felt safe including material from an earlier magazine: “I am indebted to a number of the Juvenile Miscellany, published sixteen years ago, for some of the articles in this number. The Miscellany was very popular with all young folks in its day; but, as its readers have since grown up to be men and women, the present generation will find them as new as if it had now appeared for the first time.” [1 (22 Jan 1842); p. 7]

• In 1884, 90-year-old Carolyn Gilman credited the Juvenile Miscellany as the first American work published for children, in response to the question, “Who were the first writers of children’s literature in this country … ?” [M. E. G. “The Free Parliament.” question 684. The Critic and Good Literature 12 May 1884: 239.] Unfortunately, her answer not only includes incorrect dates (late 1830s) for the periodicals she mentions, but inaccurately explains that “nothing before these … journals was printed in this country for children especially.” [Eliza W. Lippitt. “The Free Parliament.” answer to question 684. The Critic 16 Aug 1884: 84.]

source of information: 1826-1835 scattered issues and bound volumes; APS II, reels 389-390; AAS catalog; Kelly

available: AASHistPer, series 2

• APS II (1800-1850), reel 389-390

• archive.org (some issues)

bibliography:

• “Address to the Young.” The Juvenile Miscellany. 1 (Sep 1826); pp. iii-iv.

• notice. American Journal of Education, 1 (Sep 1826); p. 569. online

Masonic Mirror and Mechanic’s Intelligencer [Boston, Massachusetts], 2 (Sept 9, 1826); p. 294. online

• review. Christian Examiner, 3 (Sept & Oct 1826); pp. 427-428. online

• review. American Journal of Education, 1 (Oct 1826); p. 640. online

• review. American Journal of Education, 2 (March 1827); p. 191. online

• “Periodical Works for Children.” American Journal of Education. 2 (Dec 1827); p. 750. online

• review. Ladies’ Magazine 1 (Jan 1828); pp. 47-48. online

• review. Christian Register [Boston, Massachusetts], 7 (8 March 1828); p. 40; reprinted from the American & Gazette. online

• review. Ladies’ Magazine, 1 (July 1828); p. 336. online

• review. New-York Mirror, and Ladies’ Literary Gazette, 6 (2 Aug 1828); pp. 25-26. online

• “Juvenile Miscellanies.” The Ariel 2 (20 Sept 1828); p. 84.

• review. Christian Examiner and Theological Review 5 (Sept/Oct 1828); pp. 402-420.

• review. Christian Intelligencer & Eastern Chronicle 8 (5 Dec 1828); p. 195. online

• review. Ladies’ Magazine 2 (Feb 1829); p. 95. online

• review. American Annals of Education, 4 (July & Aug 1829); p. 383. online

• review. Ladies’ Magazine, 2 (Sept 1829); p. 440. online

• “Interesting to Juvenile Readers.” The Rural Repository 5 (25 Oct 1828); p. 87.

• notice. American Monthly Magazine 1 (Dec 1830); p. 647. online

• “Juvenile Miscellany.” Christian Watchman, 14 (3 April 1833); p. 55. online

• “Items for Youth.” Rose Bud. 1 (15 June 1833); p. 167. online

• “Note.” The Juvenile Miscellany. 6 (July/Aug 1834); p. 323.

• notice. Southern Rose Bud. 3 (18 Oct 1834); p. 27. online

• Eliza W. Lippitt. “The Free Parliament.” answer to question 684. The Critic 16 Aug 1884; p. 84.

• Mabel F. Altstetter. “Early American Magazines for Children.” Peabody Journal of Education 19 (Nov 1941); pp. 131-132.

• Betty Longenecker Lyon. “A History of Children’s Secular Magazines Published in the United States from 1789-1899.” PhD diss. Johns Hopkins, 1942; pp. 9, 15, 16, 18, 21, 23, 26, 28, 54-61.

• Edwin Charles Strohecker. “American Juvenile Literary Periodicals, 1789-1826.” PhD diss. Michigan, 1969.

• Rex Burns. Success in America: The Yeoman Dream and the Industrial Evolution. Amherst, Massachusetts: University of Massachusetts Press, 1976; pp. 19-26.

• Jill Delano Sweiger. “Conceptions of Children in American Juvenile Periodicals: 1830-1870.” PhD diss. Rutgers University, 1977.

Children’s Periodicals of the United States, ed. R. Gordon Kelly. Westport, Connecticut & London, England: Greenwood Press, 1984.

• Gillian Avery. Behold the Child: American Children and Their Books, 1621-1922. Baltimore, Maryland: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1994; pp. 82-85.

• Carolyn L. Karcher. “Lydia Maria Child and the Juvenile Miscellany: The Creation of an American Children’s Literature.” In Periodical Literature in Nineteenth-Century America, ed. Kenneth M. Price and Susan Belasco Smith. Charlottesville, Virginia: University of Virginia Press, 1995.

• Holly Keller. “Juvenile Antislavery Narrative and Notions of Childhood.” Children’s Literature, 24 (1996); pp. 86-100.

• Etsuko Taketani. “The ‘Omnipresent Aunt’ and the Social Child: Lydia Maria Child’s Juvenile Miscellany.” Children’s Literature, 27 (1999); pp. 22-39.

Juvenile Gazette ; May 1827-1828

cover/masthead: 1828

edited by: H[ugh] H[ale] Brown

published: Providence, Rhode Island: H[ugh] H[ale] Brown; “from the press of the R[hode] Island Religious Messenger”

frequency: 1827, semi-monthly, Saturday; 1828, monthly

description: 4 pp.; page size, 11″ h; price, 50¢/ year

relevant information: Providence also had an amateur Juvenile Gazette published at the same time.

relevant quote: From the prospectus: “It is intended to devote one department to religious and moral instruction; another to interesting stories, told in simple but correct language; another to a few lines of juvenile poetry; another to natural history; another to some general account of the government and laws of the country; another to such anecdotes, occurrences and news as will be likely to interest young people; another to hints and suggestions calculated to promote their progress at school; and they will occasionally\ be entertained with biographical sketches, and told something about trade, commerce, manufactures, the productions of the earth, natural curiosities, &c. &c.” [in Providence Patriot]

source of information: 26 Jan 1828 issue; Patriot

available: AASHistPer, series 2 (1 issue)

• Several periodicals reprinted pieces from the Gazette; “Resignation Enforced By a Child” [Youth’s Companion 9 Nov 1827]; a temperance anecdote [Portsmouth Journal (Portsmouth, New Hampshire) 8 March 1828].

bibliography:

• “Juvenile Gazette.” Providence Patriot and Columbian Phenix [Providence, Rhode Island] 2 May 1827; p. 2.

The Baptist Tract and Youth’s Magazine (also The Baptist Tract Magazine) ; July 1827-Dec 1835

published: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania: Baptist General Tract Society.

frequency: monthly

description: 24 pp. • 1832: page size, 7″ h x 4.5″ w • Price: originally, $1/ year; reduced to 50¢/ year in order to spur subscriptions: “A number of subscribers were obtained, but not enough to support the work: but still the need of it was felt, and a desire for its experience expressed. … On mature deliberation it has been thought that the objects of the work would be the more likely to be gained, except profit, by a reduction of the price to a rate that will make it cheaper in proportion, than any publication of the kind: and thus invite, and it is hoped, insure a large circulation.” [“To our Patrons.”]

source of information: April-Dec 1832 bound issues; “Baptist General Tract Society”; “To our Patrons”; OCLC

available: AASHistPer, series 2

bibliography:

• “Baptist General Tract Society.” The American Baptist Magazine 2 (March 1827); p. 92.

• “Prospectus of the Baptist Tract Magazine.” The Columbian Star 6 (28 April 1827); p. 68.

• “The Baptist Tract Magazine. To our Patrons and the Public.” Christian Secretary 4 (22 Sept 1827); p. 138.

Youth’s Gazette ; 13 Jan-after Feb 1827

edited by: William Russell

published: Boston, Massachusetts: Thomas B. Wait & Son.

frequency: originally, weekly; then monthly

description: Page size, 11.25″ h

• Issue #2 was available by 24 Feb 1827.

relevant information: Intended for readers ages 10 to 15. [“Youth’s Gazette.” 3 Feb 1827]

relevant quote: The Gazette promised to satisfy a wide range of interests: “The leading feature in the plan proposed are, 1. To present extracts from recent publications for youth. … 2. To furnish recent or interesting articles in those departments of science which naturally claim the attention of youth. Geography, history, biography, natural history, and various other branches entertaining and useful to the young, will here be the chief objects of attention. 3. To present a brief view of political and general intelligence foreign and domestic. 4. To select suitable reading for the improvement of hours not otherwise occupied on Sunday.” [Masonic Mirror]

source of information: Masonic Mirror; AAS catalog

available: AASHistPer, series 2

bibliography:

• “New Publication.” Masonic Mirror and Mechanics’ Intelligencer 3 (20 Jan 1827); p. 30. online

• “Youth’s Gazette.” Literary Cadet, And Saturday Evening Bulletin [Providence, Rhode Island] 1 (3 Feb 1827); p. 3.

• “Gazette for Youth.” Teacher’s Guide and Parent’s Assistant 1 (15 Feb 1827); p. 94.

• “Youth’s Gazette.” Literary Cadet, And Saturday Evening Bulletin [Providence, Rhode Island] 1 (24 Feb 1827); p. 3.

The Juvenile Magazine ; 27 Jan 1827-Dec 1828

published: Utica, New York: Western Sunday School Union.

frequency: monthly; 1 vol/ year

description: 16 pp.; page size, 5.5″ h x 3.25″ w

merged with: Sabbath School Visitant (1824-1826) to form Sabbath School Visitant and Juvenile Magazine (1829)

source of information: 1828 vol; AAS catalog; NUC

available: AASHistPer, series 2

bibliography:

American Journal of Education 2 (Nov 1827); pp. 699-700. online

• “Periodical Works for Children.” American Journal of Education 2 (Dec 1827); p. 750. online

Youth’s Companion ; 16 April, 6 June 1827-2 Aug 1834 • Youth’s Companion and Sabbath School Recorder ; 9 Aug 1834-13 May 1836 • The Youth’s Companion ; 20 May 1836-Sept 1929

cover/masthead: 6 June 1827-2 Aug 1834, 20 May 1836-8 May 1840, 14 May 1841-14 Jan 1842 | 15 May 1840-7 May 1841 | 21 Jan 21, 1842-2 May 1844 | 9 May 1844-26 April 1849 | 3 May 1849-25 Dec 1856 | 1 Jan 1857-20 Dec 1866 | 27 Dec 1866-31 Dec 1868 | Jan 1869-Dec 1872

edited by: 1827-1856, Nathaniel Willis

• 1857-1899, Daniel S. Ford

published: Boston, Massachusetts: Nathaniel Willis & Asa Rand, 16 April, 6 June 1827-13 April 1831.

• Boston, Massachusetts: Nathaniel Willis, 20 April 1831-25 Dec 1856; at 127 Washington St., 20 April 1831-14 March 1832; at 134 Washington St., 21 March 1832-26 Dec 1832; at 14 Water St., 2 Jan 1833-22 Feb 1834 (address misprinted 16 Water St., 9 Jan 1833?); at 19 Water St., 1 March 1834-8 April 1836; at 9 Cornhill, 15 April-26 Aug 1836; at 11 Cornhill, 2 Sept 1836-26 July 1849; at 22 Cornhill, 2 Aug 1849-25 Dec 1856.

• Portland, Maine: William Hyde, 9 Aug 1834-7 Oct 1836.

• Boston, Massachusetts: Olmstead & Co., 1 Jan 1857-1867.

• Boston, Massachusetts: Perry Mason & Co., 1 Aug 1867-1929.

frequency: weekly

description: 1827-1868: 4 pp.; folio • 1869-1872, 8 pp.; quarto

• Prices: 16 April 1827: $1.50/ year in advance; $2/ year paid at end of year; “If an extensive subscription should be obtained, the price will be reduced.” • 6 June 1827-1861, $1/ year • 1863, $1/ year in advance; $1.25 thereafter: “We are forced to make this rule, because of the greatly increased cost of paper on which to print the Companion. We cannot afford to make any bad debts. The cost of publishing the Companion this year will be greater ever before.” [37 (8 Jan 1863); p. 6] • 1865-1868, $1.25/ year • 1869-1872, $1.50/ year

• Page size expanded beginning with the issue for 30 May 1828. • Page size untrimmed, 1831-1833, 1840-1841, 13.5″ h x 11″ w • 1844-1850, 15.5″ h x 10.5″ w • 1851-1852, 13″ h x 11″ w • 1853-1856, 15.75″ h x 11″ w • Page size untrimmed, 1861, 19.5″ h x 14″ w • 1863, 17.5″ h x 12″ w • 1865-1868, 17″ h x 11.5″ w • 1869-1872, 14.5″ h x 10″ w

• Circulation: 1835 (from magazine), “two thousand families”. 1857 (from magazine), 4800; 1870, 60,000. 1871 (from magazine), 70,000. 1872 (from Robert Merry’s Museum), 100,000; (from Rowell), 82,000

relevant information:

• On the list of periodicals subscribed to by the Massachusetts State Reform School in 1867. [Twenty-First Annual Report]

• Recommended at a Kansas teachers’ conference in 1872 to be used for reading exercises in schools

relevant quotes:

• At age 79, Nathaniel Willis wrote of the founding: “In 1826 Mr. Asa Rand was my partner. We had a regular children’s department in the Recorder. We found all the children and youth interested in it. This suggested the idea of a children’s paper. We issued proposals for the Youth’s Companion, and the number of subscribers which came in induced us to commence in June, 1827. I had the care of the Companion, while Mr. Rand had care of the Recorder until Mr. Rand withdrew in 1830, when I had control of both papers until 1844; then the Recorder was sold to Rev. Martin Moore. I retained the Companion until 1857, when it was sold to Olmstead & Co.” [in Matthews; p. 135]

• A specimen issue was published in 16 April 1827. Prospectus: “The Editors of the Boston Recorder propose to publish a paper for the special use of Children and Youth, entitled Youth’s Companion; of which this sheet is intended as a specimen, both in respect to paper and type, and also the general quality of the matter it will contain. We have several reasons for making this proposal. We could about half fill the Recorder with interesting selections, adapted to our juvenile readers, from the various publications which we receive and peruse. Many of these are too valuable to be thrown by, and circulated no more; but we can by no means spare room to enlarge our Children’s and Youth’s Departments so as to admit one half of them. … Another reason is, that the capacities of children, and the peculiar situation and duties of youth, require select and appropriate reading. And while adults have various periodical publications, which they consider highly valuable, the younger part of the community seem to require that the same means be prepared for their gratification. If to these we add one reason more, the propriety of the step we have taken will be apparent. This is a day of peculiar care of Youth. Christians feel that their children must be trained up for Christ. Patriots and philanthropists are making rapid improvements in every branch of education. Literature, science, liberty and religion are extending in the earth. The human mind is becoming emancipated from the bondage of ignorance and superstition. Our children are born to higher destinies than their fathers …. Let their minds be formed, their hearts prepared, and their characters moulded for the scenes and the duties of a brighter day. The contents of the proposed work will be miscellaneous, though articles of a religious character will be most numerous. It will not take the form of discussion, or argument, and controversy will be entirely excluded. It will aim to inculcate truth by brief narratives, familiar illustrations, short biographies, and amusing anecdotes.” [1 (16 April 1827); p. 1]

• Lowering the subscription price for the second issue was a gamble: “We are conscious that we run a risk in reducing the price so low as our conditions state; but we do it in the confidence that the subscription will eventually be sufficient to afford us remuneration.” [“Price Reduced.” 1 (6 June 1827); p. 7]

• On the Companion’s eighth birthday, readers were given a glimpse of how their magazine was put together: “Where was it born? In the office of the Boston Recorder—and that has always been its home. … There it receives visiters, and letters from its friends. Some of the visiters’ names are London Youth’s Magazine, London Teachers’ Offering, London Child’s Companion … and besides these, it has many visiters from several States in America. From these visiters and the letters which are frequently received from friends, it gathers all the narratives, stories and anecdotes, which it relates from week to week. When the Companion has collected as many stories as it can remember, it sets off on its journeys, and visits upwards of two thousand families ….” [“Birth-Day of the Youth’s Companion.” 8 (17 April 1835); p. 193]

• The Companion is listed as a juvenile paper refusing to participate in an exchange with Youth’s Cabinet in 1839.

• The Companion was one of only a handful of periodicals that William A. Alcott felt comfortable recommending to young readers in 1844. [p. 115]

• In 1857, the New England Farmer commented on a diatribe against the Companion—unnamed in the article—because it “remains silent on the great sin of American slavery, virtually saying that young readers ought to be kept in ignorance on that crying sin of the nation.” The Farmer’s editor refused to chastise the Companion’s editor, but pointed out “that if any of their readers are dissatisfied with their course, on this question, the best way would be to send their remonstrances directly to the parties most interested.” [“Bearing Testimony Against Slavery”]

• Paper costs during the Civil War necessitated a smaller page size: “Three or four of the subscribers of the Companion have complained by letter to us, because its size has been reduced since the great rise in the cost of white paper. … The Companion could not be issued on a sheet the size of that used last year, at a less price than $1,50. The white paper on which it is now printed, should we be obliged to pay the present market prices through the year, would cost nearly one thousand dollars more in the aggregate, for the twelve months of 1863, than the editions of the larger sheet last year. … We suppose that most of our readers have noticed that the Companion is now printed on finer type than was used on the larger sheet. Subscribers, therefore, get fully as large an amount of reading as formerly. All they have lost by the change is, an extra inch or two of printed paper.” [37 (26 Feb 1863); p. 34]

• Currency could also make business a challenge: “We shall feel greatly obliged to our subscribers in New York and the Western States, if in forwarding money in payment of their subscriptions to the Companion, they will send us United States Notes or Currency. By doing so they will save us the cost of exchange, which is quite heavy.” [37 (5 March 1863); p. 38]

• The Companion was sold in 1867: “Our subscribers will notice the change that has been made in the name of the publishing firm of the Companion. Mr. Olmstead has sold his interest in the paper, and is no longer connected with it.” [“To Subscribers.” 40 (1 Aug 1867); p. 122]

absorbed: The Juvenile Watchman ; 8 March, 26 April 1833-1835 • Robert Merry’s Museum ; Feb 1841-Nov 1872

absorbed by: American Boy—Open Road ; 1919-1954

source of information: 1828-1872, scattered issues & bound volumes; APS II, reel 1546-1572; AAS catalog; Kelly; Rowell

available: AASHistPer, series 2, 3, 4, 5 • APS II (1800-1850), reel 1546-1572

Youth’s Companion, ed. Lovell Thompson. Boston, Massachusetts: Houghton Mifflin Co., 1954.

• excerpts in Companions of Our Youth: Stories by Women for Young People’s Magazines, 1865-1900, ed. Jane Benardete and Phyllis Moe. New York: Frederick Ungar Publishing Co., 1980.

excerpts online

bibliography:

• “New Year’s Present.” Boston Recorder 15 (8 Dec 1830); p. 194. online

• “Birth-Day of the Youth’s Companion.” Youth’s Companion. 8 (17 April 1835); p. 193.

• advertisement: “A Weekly Paper for Youth.” Vermont Chronicle [Bellows Falls, Vermont] 16 Aug 1837; p. 4.

• advertisement: “New Year’s Gift.” Vermont Chronicle [Bellows Falls, Vermont] 18 dec 1839; p. 3.

• William A. Alcott. The Boy’s Guide to Usefulness. Boston; p. Waite, Peirce, and Company, 1844; p. 115. [google books]

• George Adams. The Boston Directory … 1848. Boston, Massachusetts: James French, 1848; p. 36. [google books]

The Boston Directory … 1849. Boston, Massachusetts: George Adams, 1849; p. 41. [archive.org]

The Boston Directory, for the Year 1851. Boston, Massachusetts: George Adams, 1851; appendix, p. 32. [google books]

• John Livingston. Livingston’s Law Register, for 1852. New York: U. S. Law Magazine, 1852; catalog of newspapers, p. 20. [archive.org]

The Boston directory for the Year 1852. Boston, Massachusetts: George Adams, 1852; p. 36. [google books]

• “Bearing Testimony Against Slavery.” New England Farmer [Boston, Massachusetts] 28 Feb 1857; p. 2.

• Daniel J. Kenny, comp. The American Newspaper Directory. New York: Watson & Co., 1861; p. 31. [google books]

Twenty-First Annual Report of the Trustees of the State Reform School. Boston, Massachusetts: Wright & Potter, 1868; p. 18. [google books]

• “Children’s Magazines.” The St. Johnsbury Caledonian [St. Johnsbury, Vermont] 13 Nov 1868; p. 2.

Geo. P. Rowell & Co’s American Newspaper Directory. New York: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1869; p. 45. [archive.org]

• “A Wide-Awake Youth’s Paper.” Reading Times [Reading, Pennsylvania] 1 Dec 1869; p. 1.

• “The Oldest Youth’s Publication.” The Indiana Democrat [Indiana, Pennsylvania] 2 Dec 1869; p. 3.

The Men Who Advertise. New York: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1870; p. 665. [google books]

Wentworth’s Boston Commercial Directory for 1871. Boston, Massachusetts: Wentworth & Co., 1870; p. 120. [google books]

Geo. P. Rowell & Co.’s American Newspaper Directory. New York: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1871; p. 64. [hathitrust.org]

Geo. P. Rowell & Co.’s American Newspaper Directory. New York: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1872; p. 74. [archive.org]

• “Teachers Institute.” La Cygne Journal [La Cygne, Kansas] 4 May 1872; p. 2.

• Harriet L. Matthews. “Children’s Magazines.” Bulletin of Bibliography. 1 (April 1899); pp. 133-136.

• C. A. Stephens. “When The Youth’s Companion was Young,” in Stories of My Home Folks. Boston, Massachusetts: Perry Mason Company, 1926.

• Goldie Platner Merrill. “The Development of American Secular Juvenile Magazines: A Study of the Educational Significance of Their Content.” PhD diss. University of Washington, 1938.

• Frank Luther Mott. “Youth’s Companion,” in A History of American Magazines: vol 2, 1850-1865. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Harvard University Press, 1938; pp. 262-274.

• Eleanor Weakley Nolen. “Nineteenth Century Children’s Magazines.” The Horn Book Magazine. 15 (Jan/Feb 1939); pp. 55-60.

• Mabel F. Altstetter. “Early American Magazines for Children.” Peabody Journal of Education 19 (Nov 1941); pp. 133-134.

• Betty Longenecker Lyon. “A History of Children’s Secular Magazines Published in the United States from 1789-1899.” PhD diss. Johns Hopkins, 1942; pp. 5, 9, 10, 15, 17, 18, 24, 26, 62-74, 149, 150, 167, 274, 374, 377.

• R. Gordon Kelly. Mother was a Lady. Westport, Connecticut: Greenwood Press, 1974.

• Rex Burns. Success in America: The Yeoman Dream and the Industrial Evolution. Amherst, Massachusetts: University of Massachusetts Press, 1976; pp. 51-87.

• Jill Delano Sweiger. “Conceptions of Children in American Juvenile Periodicals: 1830-1870.” PhD diss. Rutgers University, 1977.

Children’s Periodicals of the United States, ed. R. Gordon Kelly. Westport, Connecticut & London, England: Greenwood Press, 1984.

• Gillian Avery. Behold the Child: American Children and Their Books, 1621-1922. Baltimore, Maryland: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1994; pp. 82-83.

• Katherine C. Grier. “Childhood Socialization and Companion Animals: United States, 1820-1870.” Society and Animals 7 (1999); pp. 95-120.

• Lorinda Cohoon. “Festive Citizenships: Independence Celebrations in New England Children’s Periodicals and Series Books.” Children’s Literature Association Quarterly 31 (Summer 2006); pp. 132-153.

• Lorinda B. Cohoon. “Educating Boys for American Citizenship: Jacob Abbott’s Contributions to the Youth’s Companion,” in Serialized Citizenships: Periodicals, Books, and American Boys, 1840-1911. Lanham, MD: The Scarecrow Press, 2006; pp. 1-29.

The Child’s Magazine ; July 1827-1844

cover/masthead: July 1827

published: New York, New York: Bangs & Emory, for the Sunday School Union of the Methodist Episcopal Church, 1827.

• New York, New York: T. Mason & G. Lane, for the Sunday School Union of the Methodist Episcopal Church, 1837.

• New York, New York: G. Lane & P. P. Sandford, for the Sunday School Union of the Methodist Episcopal Church, 1842.

• New York, New York: Lane & Tippett, 1848; printed by Joseph Longking.

frequency: monthly; 1 vol/year

description: 16 pp.; page size, 5.25″ h x 3.5″ w. • Price, 1827: 8 or more copies, 25¢/ year

• Religious focus: Methodist Episcopal

relevant information:

•Volumes were reprinted several times, with date of reprint on the title page. Reprints were not necessarily reproductions of the original printing: a reprint of vol 1 (1827-1828) dated 1837 has a different font size and different pagination from the original.

• The Christian Advocate reprinted the contents for Jan 1828.

relevant quotes:

• Prospectus: “It is intended to embrace in this little work short practical essays, anecdotes, narratives, accounts of the conversion and happy deaths of children, facts illustrative of the conduct of Providence, sketches of natural history, poetry, &c. The constant aim in conducting this little work, will be to lead the infant mind to the knowledge of God our Saviour. … The plan of this work will not at all interfere with the Youth’s Instructer and Guardian; nor is it intended, in any case, to supersede it; being designed, as its title intimates, for younger children.” [1 (July 1827): inside front cover (cover page 2)]

• Seeing the first issue of the magazine, one editor felt it was “similar in design and plan to the little magazine published for the same class of readers, by the American S. S. Union”—possibly the Teacher’s Offering. [We have received the first number]

• One editor contrasted the Magazine with the reading material that children could have enjoyed: “If parents, instead of permitting their children to waste their little funds upon idle fable, the melodies of Mother Goose, and other trash of the same cast, would provide for them reading so well adapted to give a proper direction to their thoughts and feelings, as that contained in works of a character similar to this little Tract, they would be pursuing a wiser and in the end more satisfactory course.” [notice. New-Bedford Mercury]

• The editors felt accountable to a higher authority: “Dear little Readers,—The editors of this Magazine are personally unknown to you, and perhaps in this world we may never see your faces. Yet we feel thankful to God, that through the medium of the press we can meet you once a month, and converse with you about those things which relate to your peace and happiness here, and to your everlasting joy and felicity hereafter. And while we bless God for this great and precious privilege, let us remember that we shall one day appear before him—the editors to give an account for every word which they put into this book, and you for the manner in which you read, and the improvement you make.” [“Introductory Address.” 1 (July 1827); p. 1]

relevant information: In 1849, an advertisement for bound volumes implies that the Magazine is no longer being published.

continued by: The Encourager ; Dec 1844-1847?

source of information: 1827 issue; 1848 bound volume; OCLC; AAS catalog; Batsel

available: AASHistPer, series 2

bibliography:

• “Child’s Magazine.” Christian Advocate and Journal 1 (26 May 1827); p. 150.

• “Child’s Magazine.” Christian Advocate and Journal 1 (2 June 1827); pp. 154-155.

• We have received the first number. Vermont Chronicle [Bellows Falls, Vermont] 29 June 1827; p. 3.

• “Child’s Magazine Again.” Christian Advocate and Journal 1 (20 July 1827); p. 182.

• notice. New-Bedford Mercury [New Bedford, Massachusetts] 21 (20 July 1827); p. 1.

• Contents of Aug issue. Zion’s Herald 5 (8 Aug 1827); p. 127.

• Lewis Garrett. Letter. Christian Advocate and Journal 2 (5 Oct 1827); p. 19.

• “Child’s Magazine.” Christian Advocate 2 (28 Dec 1827); p. 67.

• “The Sunday School Union of the Methodist Episcopal Church.” Christian Watchman 9 (25 July 1828); p. 119.

• “The Child’s Magazine.” Christian Advocate and Journal and Zion’s Herald 3 (28 Nov 1828); p. 51.

• “Child’s Magazine.” Christian Advocate and Journal and Zion’s Herald 3 (3 April 1829); p. 122.

• Contents for Sept 1831. Christian Advocate and Journal and Zion’s Herald 6 (30 Sept 1831); p. 19.

• Contents for May and June 1832. Christian Advocate and Journal and Zion’s Herald 6 (20 April 1832); p. 135.

• Prices of publications. Christian Advocate and Journal 8 (3 Jan 1834); p. 75.

• Advertisement of bound volumes. Christian Advocate and Journal 24 (30 Aug 1849); p. 140.

• “Introduction.” The Youth’s Monitor 1 (Jan? 1851); pp. 5-6.

• Mabel F. Altstetter. “Early American Magazines for Children.” Peabody Journal of Education 19 (Nov 1941); p. 132.

Juvenile Gazette ; 24 Nov 1827-15 Nov 1828

cover/masthead: 1827-1828

edited by: Oliver Kendall, jr

published: Providence, Rhode Island: Oliver Kendall, jr, 1827.

frequency: 24 Nov 1827-10 May 1828, weekly. “Printed every Saturday” (1 Dec 1827)

description: 24 Nov 1827-10 May 1828: 4 pp.; page size, 4″ h x 2 5/8″ w; “Those who wish to take this paper can leave there [sic] names at O. Kendall’s Book Store, 2 Market Sq.” [24 Nov 1827; p. 3]

24 Nov 1827-2 Feb 1828: price, 2¢/month, “payable in advance” (1 Dec 1827) • 9 Feb 1828-10 May 1828: price, 25¢/year, “payable quarterly in advance.” • late 1828: page size, 6″ h x 9″ w; price, 50¢/ year [Kendall; p. 105]

relevant information: This paper shares a name with another Juvenile Gazette published by H. H. Brown in the same city at the same time.

• Oliver Kendall, jr, was 14 years old in 1827. [“Librarian’s Report”; pp. 36-37; Kendall; p. 103]

relevant quotes:

• In 1828, the size of the paper appears to have amused other editors: one described it as being “a sheet about six inches square.” [“Juvenile Miscellanies”]; the New York Enquirer called it “very decidedly the smallest newspaper in the world.” [in Portsmouth Journal 3 May 1828] The Toilet and Ladies’s Cabinet of Literature claimed that the Gazette of late 1828 was “five times its original size. It was, before the enlargement took place, printed on a form of three inches by four, folio; but now, in consequence of the great increase of patronage it has swelled to the enormous size of six inches by nine.” [in Kendall, pp. 104-105]

• The Southern Galaxy declared that the Gazette was “edited with ability, but without much labor.” [“A Little young Newspaper”]

• The Pensacola Gazette seemed amused by the Gazette’s stance on political blather and took an opportunity to lambaste non-paying subscribers: “We have received 40 numbers of this miniature paper …. We copy the following cogent reason, for the political course Mr. Kendall intended to pursue, from the second number. ‘We shall not meddle much with politics but when we do, we shall defend J. Q. Adams, as his name is much shorter than General Andrew Jackson, and we have no room for long names.’ This is all we find about politics in the whole forty numbers. Even this cheap paper, we observe, is compelled frequently and earnestly to dun its subscribers! What can be the reason that those who take Newspapers, will permit their publishers to suffer, for want of the small sum due from each ot them? It is thoughtlessness in them, but ‘death to us.’ ” [“Juvenile Gazette” 23 Sept 1828]

continues: O. Kendall, sr, had published the Juvenile Gazette ; Nov 1819-Jan 1820?

source of information: 24 Nov 1827-10 May 1828 vol; AAS catalog; Kendall

available: excerpts online

bibliography:

• “Another Newspaper.” The Portsmouth Journal [Portsmouth, New Hampshire] 3 May 1828; p. 2. Also Daily Georgian [Savannah, Georgia] 5 May 1828; p. 2. Also Gazette of Maine [Portland, Maine] 6 May 1828; p. 2.

• notice. Vermont Gazette 20 May 1828; p. 1. Also Essex Gazette [Haverhill, Massachusetts] 24 May 1828; p. 3.

• “A little young Newspaper.” Cincinnati Chronicle and Literary Gazette [Cincinnati, Ohio] 31 May 1828; p. 3. Also, “A Little Young Newspaper.” Southern Galaxy [Natchez, Mississippi] 10 July 1828; p. 1.

• notice. American Traveller [Boston, Massachusetts] 19 Aug 1828; p. 2.

• “Juvenile Miscellanies.” The Ariel 2 (20 Sept 1828); p. 84.

• “Juvenile Gazette.” Pensacola Gazette [Pensacola, Florida] 23 Sept 1828; p. 3.

• “Interesting to Juvenile Readers.” The Rural Repository 5 (25 Oct 1828); p. 87.

• notice. The Toilet or Ladies’ Cabinet of Literature [Providence, Rhode Island] 11 Nov 1828 [reprinted in Kendall; pp. 104-105]

• “Librarian’s Report.” Proceedings of the Rhode Island Historical Society, 1902-1903. Providence, Rhode Island: 1904; pp. 30-38.

• Oliver Kendall. Memorial of Josiah Kendall. Providence, Rhode Island: Oliver Kendall, 1884; pp. 103-109.

• Betty Longenecker Lyon. “A History of Children’s Secular Magazines Published in the United States from 1789-1899.” PhD diss. Johns Hopkins, 1942; pp. 10, 75-76.

• Gillian Avery. Behold the Child: American Children and Their Books, 1621-1922. Baltimore, Maryland: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1994; p. 81.

Youth’s Journal ; Jan 1828-1829?

edited by: Asa Lyman

published: New York, New York: Asa Lyman.

frequency: weekly

description:

• Price, $1.50/ year

• The Christian Advocate received the first issue at the end of Dec 1827, which implies that the first official issue is probably Jan 1828. The Free Enquirer describes an issue for 11 Oct 1828. Extracts from the Journal were reprinted in newspapers well into 1829.

relevant quotes:

• Lyman’s intent: “It will be his object, in furnishing matter for the paper, to consult variety; to have the articles, both select and original, short, entertaining, and instructive: such as are calculated to interest the youthful mind, and to give it a correct and useful turn of thought; to store it with practical and important knowledge, and to imbue it with pure and wholesome sentiments. Nothing sectarian or invidious will be admitted. Articles of a literary nature—miscellaneous intelligence—interesting occurrences in the political and religious world—information of the various improvements of the day—useful anecdotes—biographies—historical sketches; in short, such pieces as are best calculated to excite and cherish a love for reading—for mental investigation and inquiry—to cultivate a correct taste, and at the same time improve the mind and meliorate the heart—will be embraced in the objects of this publication. It is the subscriber’s wish and object, that the paper which he proposes to issue may subserve the interests both of civil society and the church of God. It will be his constant aim to make it agreeable and useful to the rising generation, for whom it is especially designed.” [in Christian Advocate]

• At least one reader was more amused than impressed by the material in the Journal; sardonically discussing a story in the Journal that details the divine punishment of “infidels” who parodied the ritual of communion, “V.” took the story with more than a grain of salt: “Now I call upon the reverend gentleman [the editor] to substantiate this story: I call upon him for names and dates: if the story be true, it would seem to be a most pointed manifestation of divine wrath, and might carry conviction to a thousand bosoms, and no considerations, worldly or personal, should be permitted to weigh for a moment against the importance of establishing its authenticity. If the relatives of the deceased mockers are pious people, they should endeavor, rather to spread than conceal so remarkable a judgment. And if they are not pious people, then certainly they and their feelings are entitled to no respect or forbearance, on the part of those who are. So great is this Rev. editor’s love of the marvellous, that there is absolutely no computing the wonders and miracles recorded in his ‘pious and talented little paper.’ ” [V. “Communications.”]

source of information: OCLC; notices, etc., below

available: One piece from the Journal was reprinted in the Western Luminary [4 (16 April 1828): 329].

• The Northern Sentinel [Burlington, Vermont] reprinted an amusing anecdote [2 Jan 1829; p. 1].

• The Vermont Telegraph [Brandon, Vermont] reprinted “How children ought to answer inquisitive and meddling people” [19 May 1829; p. 4].

• The Brattleboro Messenger [Brattleboro, Vermont] reprinted “Teaching Children to Lie” [10 July 1829; p. 4].

• The Cherokee Phoenix and Indians Advocate [New Echota, Georgia] reprinted “Story of a Living Fact” [12 Aug 1829; p. 4]

bibliography:

• “Youth’s Journal.” Christian Advocate 2 (28 Dec 1827); p. 67.

• Senex. “From the Youth’s Journal.” Western Luminary 4 (16 April 1828); p. 329.

• V. “Communications.” The Free Enquirer 1 (18 March 1829); p. 164.

The Scholar’s Quarterly Journal ; Feb-Nov 1828 • The Scholar’s Journal ; 15 Jan 1829-15 Nov 1829

cover/masthead: 1828

edited by: Emerson Davis, “preceptor of Westfield Academy”

published: Westfield, Massachusetts: Emerson Davis; printed by press of the Westfield Register

frequency: vol 1: quarterly; vol 2: every six weeks

description: Vol 1 is Feb-Nov 1828: title: The Scholar’s Quarterly Journal; 4 issues; 24 pp.; page size, 8.5″ h; price, 12½¢/ per issue

• Vol 2 is 15 Jan-15 Nov 1829: title: The Scholar’s Journal; 8 issues; 8 pp.; page size, 8.5″ h; prices: 1 copy, 25¢/ year; 5 copies, $1/ year

• Also called “Davis’ Scholar’s Journal” in at least one periodical

relevant information:

• Devoted entirely to education, the Journal included articles and extracts on natural history, geography, history, chemistry, geology, astronomy, physics, and miscellaneous human endeavors; biographies of scientists and philosophers were included.

• In April 1830, a convention of Massachusetts teachers recommended the Journal for schools; unfortunately, by this time the magazine was no longer being published.

relevant quotes:

• The intention was to provide a source of education for young people: “The Journal is intended primarily for the present and former students of Westfield Academy, but will be of equal utility to young people generally. The leading object will be to cultivate a taste for the sciences, to gratify that taste by bringing before the mind subjects for contemplation, and to excite a spirit of inquirty by shewing the application of nature’s laws to nature’s phenomena. This may be considered too great an object to accomplish by a small Quarterly Journal. It seemed advisable to commence upon a small scale, not knowing how the subject may be regarded by those for whom it is intended. It is hoped that Preceptors of Academies and Instructors generally will interest themselves in the undertaking and that instead of a Quarterly, we may by a combined effort, soon send forth a Monthly Journal, to inform and elevate the minds of the rising generation. This Journal I am persuaded if conducted agreeable to its design must have a good tendency, for it is only an attempt to instruct in a little different manner. It is well known that books of science are either so expensive that young people cannot have access to them, or in a style so far above their comprehension that they cannot understand them, and consequently their knowledge of the sciences is limited to the few general principles found in school books. Periodicals, moral, religious and literary in their character, are multiplying at the present day, desinged expressly for youth, but there are none of a scientific character. I therefore enter upon unoccupied ground, and hope the friends of education will use their influence to extend the circulation of the Journal in which they have a common interest with the Editor. Every one who can form any estimate of the labor of preparing the articles and of the expense of publishing, will see that it is not commenced from pecuniary motives.” [“Editor’s Preface.” 1 (Feb 1828); p. 1]

• Because of the weight of Davis’s other duties, issues for the next year would be smaller, but published more often: “The Journal has now been continued one year. It was not undertaken for the purpose of gain, and has not been a source of emolument. The conductor of it wished to do something towards the formation of a taste for scientific works among young people, especially his pupils. He begs leaves [sic] to inform his readers that on account of the increasing labors of his school, and to afford time to revise, and enlarge his courses of Lectures, he will, for the next year issue the Journal once in 6 weeks in numbers of 8 pages each beginning the latter part of January; making 8 Numbers in the year, at the moderate price of 25 cents for the year[.] It will be called therefore, Scholar’s Journal, not a Quarterly Journal.” [“Notice to Readers.” 1 (Nov 1828); p. 24]

source of information: NUC; OCLC; AASHistPer; “Scholar’s Quarterly Journal”

available: AASHistPer, series 2

• Pieces from the Journal were reprinted in various periodicals: “Earthquakes,” in the New England Farmer [Boston, Massachusetts; 5 Sept 1828; p. 4]; “Pressure of Water Upon Dams,” in The Middlebury People’s Press [Middlebury, Vermont; 11 March 1829; p. 4]; “Cork,” in The Pittsfield Sun [Pittsfield, Massachusetts; 12 March 1829; p. 3]

bibliography:

• “Scholar’s Quarterly Journal.” Christian Spectator 2 (1 April 1828); p. 217.

• A Convention of Teachers. The Natchez Weekly Democrat [Natchez, Mississippi] 8 May 1830; p. 7.

The Hive ; 27 Sept 1828-20 Sept 1830

cover/masthead: 1829-1830

published: Salem, Massachusetts: W. & S. B. Ives, 18 March-9 Sept 1829; Ives at #6 Old Paved St. • Salem, Massachusetts: W. & S. B. Ives, 12 Sept 1829-20 Sept 1830; Ives at Old Paves St.

frequency: weekly; 1 vol/ year.

description: 1828-9 Sept 1829: 4 pp.; page size untrimmed, 6″ h x 4″ w; price, 30¢/ year, “in advance.” [18 March 1829; p. 104] Agents: E. Gunnison (Danvers); John Gilley (Marblehead); John Ireson (Lynn); Benjamin H. Ives (Boston)

• 12 Sept 1829-20 Sept 1830: 4 pp.; page size, 9″ h x 5.25″ w; price, 30¢/ year, “in advance.” [3 Oct 1829; p. 5]

relevant information:

• Writing in 1856, Gilbert Streeter has the first issue published on 21 Sept 1828.

• The first issues were published on Saturday; Streeter says that with issue #6 publication moved to Wednesday.

relevant quotes:

• The Hive may be a periodical mentioned in a notice of the Juvenile Gazette: “A Juvenile Gazette is published in Providence, R. I. about 3 by 5 inches in extent, and we understand an infant production of the same size, and on the same plan, is to be issued in Salem, Mass.” [American Traveller]

• Intended “to present to the juvenile reader a miniature copy of a newspaper …. The selections … will be strictly confined to those articles, which combine instruction with innocent amusement.” [in Lyon; p. 82]

• Editors of periodicals for adults were amused, especially by the page size of the paper: “The smallest newspaper in the known world, without any dispute, has reached us from Salem,” stated the Boston Palladium. “It is called ‘The Hive,’ and may be read profitably by all our little statesmen and stateswomen, in the nursery, before breakfast. The paper is five inches long by three in width: it has not yet declared itself on the Presidential question.” [in Vermont Chronicle] The Boston Patriot and Mercantile Advertiser called it “a paper about the size of a short gingerbread cake.” [14 Nov 1828; p. 2] The American Traveller (Boston, Massachusetts) accurately noted, however, that it was “the smallest newspaper, save a similar one in Providence, in the world.” [7 Oct 1828; p. 2]

• The 12 Sept 1829 issue was a specimen of the new format: “It will be seen that we have enlarged the Hive to more than double its former size, and have put it at the low price of 50 cents per annum, payable on the delivery of the next number. It is intended to give it a more miscellaneous character than the last volume, so that it may suit the tastes and wants of readers in general. The present Number is published as a specimen, and if the encouragement shall warrant we will commence its regular publication on the 3d of October next. Those who wish to subscribe will please leave their names at the Book-Store of W. & S. B. Ives, Old Paved street.” [12 Sept 1829; p. 4]

• On the last issue: “This number closes the 2d volume of the Hive—and its publication will cease from this time.—Those of our subscribers who have preserved their No’s can have them bound for 25 cents, and be furnished with a Title Page, by leaving them at the Bookstore of W. & S. B. Ives.” [20 Sept 1830; p. 207]

source of information: 18 March-9 Sept 1829, scattered issues; 12 Sept 1829-20 Sept 1830 vol; Lyon

available: AASHistPer, series 2

bibliography:

• Possible notice. American Traveller [Boston, Massachusetts] 19 Aug 1828; p. 2.

• “New Juvenile Paper.” Vermont Chronicle [Bellows Falls, Vermont] 10 Oct 1828; p. 3. Also, “Interesting to Juvenile Readers.” The Rural Repository 5 (25 Oct 1828); p. 87.

Boston Patriot and Mercantile Advertiser [Boston, Massachusetts] 14 Nov 1828; p. 2.

• notice. American Traveller [Boston, Massachusetts] 7 Oct 1828; p. 2.

• Gilbert Streeter. An Account of the Newspapers and Other Periodicals Published in Salem, from 1768 to 1856. Salem, Massachusetts: Wm. Ives and Geo. W. Pease, 1856; p. 25. [archive.org]

• Betty Longenecker Lyon. “A History of Children’s Secular Magazines Published in the United States from 1789-1899.” PhD diss. Johns Hopkins, 1942; pp. 10, 17, 21, 27, 82-83.

The Juvenile Repertory ; Sept 1828-Jan 1829?

cover/masthead: 1828-1829

edited by: Pardon Davis

published: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania: Pardon Davis.

frequency: monthly

description: Jan 1829 is issue #5

source of information: OCLC; AAS catalog; Lyon

available: AASHistPer, series 2

bibliography:

• Betty Longenecker Lyon. “A History of Children’s Secular Magazines Published in the United States from 1789-1899.” PhD diss. Johns Hopkins, 1942; pp. 10, 22, 77-80.

The Sabbath School Messenger, and Children’s Friend ; Oct 1828-Sept 1829?

cover/masthead: 1829

published: Albany, New York: Lewis G. Hoffman. 1829: “Printed at the Office of the Christian Register, for the Central Union, and sold at their Depository, 404, N. Market-street.” [1 (May 1829): back cover (cover page 4)]

frequency: monthly

description: 16 pp.; page size untrimmed, 5.25″ h x 3.5″ w. Prices: 3¢/ month; 1-5 copies, 37.5¢/ year; 5-20 copies, 31.25¢/ year; over 20 copies, 25¢/ year

• Religious focus

relevant information: The title may have incorporated that of the Children’s Friend (Jan 1826-1827?), also published in Albany.

relevant quote: Money problems may have halted the Messenger: “At the close of this last No. of the 1st vol. of the Sabbath School Messenger, we would give notice, that a considerable amount of money has been borrowed for defraying the expences of this publication: For the payment of this loan, we are depending upon the several sums due on our subscription list. It is therefore particularly requested that all monies due from subscribers be paid or forwarded, so soon as practicable, to D. McKercher at the Depository of the Central S. S. Union, No. 323 North Market street Albany. Any persons who may wish to become subscribers, and all who desire to increase or diminish their number of copies, are requested to give immediate notice of their intentions, that definite arrangements may be made for the ensuing year, addressing ‘The editor of the Sabbath School Messenger, Albany.’ ” [“To Subscribers.” 1 (Sept 1829); p. 188.] No issues after Sept 1829 have been located.

probably continued by: The Sabbath School Messenger, and Children’s Friend (1 May 1831-1832?)

source of information: May 1829 issue; AASHistPer; AAS catalog

available: AASHistPer, series 2

bibliography:

• “New Publications.” Boston Recorder [Boston, Massachusetts] 13 (31 Oct 1828); p. 175.

• The Central Union at albany. Vermont Chronicle [Bellows Falls, Vermont] 7 Nov 1828; p. 1.

The Children’s Magazine ; Jan 1829-1874

cover/masthead: 1831 | 1857

edited by: W. R. Whittingham, 1838

• Anthony Ten Broeck, 1844-1845

• Rev. Spencer, until Jan 1857

• Rev. A. B. Hart, 1857-1862

published: New York, New York: General Protestant Episcopal Sunday School Union, 1829-1874. New York, New York: E. P. Dutton & Co., 1869-1872. 1837, publisher at 28 Ann st.; 1845, publisher at 20 John st.; 1861, 1869, publisher at 762 Broadway

• Printed at the Protestant Episcopal Press, 46 Lumber St., 1831

frequency: monthly; 1830, 2 vol/ year

description: 24 pp.; page size: 6″ h x 3.75″ w

• Prices, 1829, 1831-1850: 1 copy, 25¢/ year; 50 copies, $10/ year. 1857, 1861: 25¢/ year; subscription must be for at least 4 copies per address. 1869-1872: 50¢

• Circulation, 1830, 6000; 1872, abt 10,000

relevant information:

• Contents for early issues were printed in advertisements for the New York Protestant Episcopal Press: issue 3, The Evening Post [New York, New York] 3 March 1830; p. 3; issue 4, The Evening Post [New York, New York] 2 April 1830; p. 3.

relevant quotes:

• “This magazine … is to you like the talent in the parable. God has given it to you to do you good, and you will have to answer to him for the way in which you use it. If you read it merely out of curiosity, and forget all it teaches as soon as you have done, or only remember what is meant to make its teaching pleasant to you, and cannot of itself do you any good;—then you will waste your talent. You will make what might have done you good, the means of bringing you into greater sin.” [1 (Jan 1829); pp. 3-4]

• Some Southern readers were less than appreciative with the Magazine’s position against slavery; unhappy with the Aug 1851 issue, C. Hanckel declared, “Hitherto the Clergy and Laity of the South in the Protestant Episcopal Church have placed implicit reliance on the good faith and good sense and discretion of this organ of religious instruction, on the subject of slavery, aand distributed their publications without hesitation or restriction. Even the number that has elicited these remarks, I regret to say, is in the hands of many children of my own charge; but the copies will be recalled, and measures taken to prevent a similar occurrence.”

• The Jan 1857 issue was destroyed by fire and had to be redone: “In consequence of the very destructive fire at our printer’s, on Christmas-Eve, the January number of the Magazine was entirely destroyed. This must serve as apology for delay, since new matter had to be prepared, and the Magazine got out as speedily as possible.” [“Note.” 39 (Jan 1857); p. 48.]

source of information: 1829, 1831-1862, scattered issues & bound volumes; AAS catalog; Kelly; Longworth’s ; Doggett’s ; Kenny; Rowell

available: AASHistPer, series 3, 4, 5

bibliography:

• “Periodical Literature.” The Charleston Mercury [Charleston, South Carolina] 29 Sept 1828; p. 1.

• advertisement: “An Edition of the Book of Common Prayer.” The Evening Post [New York, New York] 3 March 1830; p. 3.

• advertisement: “An Edition of the Book of Common Prayer.” The Evening Post [New York, New York] 2 April 1830; p. 3.

• “Gifts for Christmas & New Year.” The Evening Post [New York, New York] 22 Dec 1830; p. 3.

Longworth’s American Almanac, New-York Register, and City Directory. New York: Thomas Longworth, 1837; p. 706. [google books]

Doggett’s New-York City Directory for 1845 & 1846, 4th ed. New York: John Doggett, Jr., 1845; p. 429. [google books]

• C. Hanckel. letter. The Charleston Daily Courier [Charleston, South Carolina] 12 Sept 1851; p. 2.

• Franklin B. Hough. “Newspapers and Other Periodicals Published in New-York in 1855,” in Census of the State of New-York, for 1855. Albany, New York: Charles Van Benthuysen, 1857; pp. 488-489.

• Daniel J. Kenny, comp. The American Newspaper Directory. New York: Watson & Co., 1861; p. 49. [google books]

• Franklin B. Hough. “Newspapers and Other Periodicals,” in Census of the State of New York, for 1865. Albany, New York: Charles Van Benthuysen & Sons, 1867; pp. 590-591.

Geo. P. Rowell & Co’s American Newspaper Directory. New York: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1869; p. 76. [archive.org]

The Men Who Advertise. New York: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1870; p. 705. [google books]

Geo. P. Rowell & Co.’s American Newspaper Directory. New York: Geo. P. Rowell & Co., 1872; p. 125. [archive.org]

• Eleanor Weakley Nolen. “Nineteenth Century Children’s Magazines.” The Horn Book Magazine. 15 (Jan/Feb 1939); pp. 55-60.

Children’s Periodicals of the United States, ed. R. Gordon Kelly. Westport, Connecticut & London, England: Greenwood Press, 1984.

The Infants’ Magazine ; Jan 1829-Dec 1842

edited by: Paul Beck

published: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania: American Sunday School Union

frequency: monthly; 2 vol/ year

description: 16 pp.; page size, 4.25″ h x 2.5″ w; price, ½¢/ issue; 18¢/ year

• Religious focus

relevant information: The bound volumes were available for sale three years after the last issue. [“Holiday Presents”]

relevant quotes:

• An introduction to parents and teachers: “The design of this publication is to supply children under six or seven years of age, with a MONTHLY REWARD BOOK, suited to their age and capacity, and to assist parents and teachers in the work of education, by exciting a taste for reading. The numbers are sold at a cent and a half each, or 18 cents a year; and the numbers for a year form an interesting volume.” [“Advertisement.” 1 (Jan 1829); p. ii]

• An introduction to the young readers: “Will our little friends listen to us for a few moments, while we tell them of our wish to do them good? It is this which has led us to undertake the trouble and expense of printing this little Magazine; we wish that this may learn you the way to be good, to be useful, and to be happy. We wish you to learn to be good, that your parents and friends may all love you dearly, and that the great God in Heaven may love you. We wish you to learn to be very industrious, that you may be useful and do good; and if you are good, just as the bible tells us all to be good, and able to do good, we know that you will always be happy.” [“An Address to Infant Scholars.” 1 (Jan 1829); p. 3]

source of information: July-Dec 1830 vol; July-Dec 1832 vol; AASHistPer, series 2 & 3; OCLC; Kelly

available: AASHistPer, series 2 & 3

• The Vermont Telegraph [Brandon, Vermont] reprinted “Vain Glory” [17 Sept 1833].

bibliography:

• “From the Annual Report of the Board of Managers.” Vermont Chronicle [Windsor, Vermont] 26 June 1829; p. 1.

• “Infant’s Magazine.” Vermont Telegraph [Brandon, Vermont] 17 Sept 1833; p. 208.

• “Holiday Presents.” The Evening Post [New York, New York] 30 Dec 1845; p. 4.

Children’s Periodicals of the United States, ed. R. Gordon Kelly. Westport, Connecticut & London, England: Greenwood Press, 1984.

Youth’s Herald and Sabbath School Magazine ; Jan 1829-Dec 1830

published: Middlebury, Vermont: Vermont Sunday School Union, Jan 1829-Dec 1830; issue described in NUC was printed by Ovid Miner

• In OCLC: Rutland, Vermont: Vermont Sunday School Union, Jan 1829-Dec 1830.

frequency: monthly

description: 16 pp.; page size, 11″ h

• Prices: 1 copy, 37.5¢/ year; 3-10 copies, 33 1/3¢/ year; 10-20 copies, 30¢/ year; 20+ copies, 25¢/ year

• Circulation: 1829, 2,000. 1830, 1,500

• In 1830, 1,700 copies were printed per month, 200 being kept for binding. [“Fifth Annual Report”]

relevant quotes:

• “Prospectus”: “The influence of good reading, upon the intellect and heart, is, indeed, precious. It is no less so, in childhood, than in riper years. It is, therefore, a matter of bitter regret, that among the multitude of books and periodicals, which the press has poured upon the world; so few are fit for the reading of children and youth. Among those designed for children, and written in a plain and easy style; many are idle stories, and vitiating in their character. Other works, containing valuable thought, have so effectually concealed it, beneath hard words and dark phrases, that the child cannot come at it. The frothy works of the first class, waste the child’s time, and so corrupt his taste, that he has no relish for good reading. The unintelligible works of the second class, are so dry and uninteresting, that children will not read them unless compelled to it: and if they are; they read as in an unknown tongue, and acquire a bias against books, which riper years may not be able to efface. Most of the works in print, will come under one of the above mentioned classes. [p. 2] There are, however, a few happy exceptions; and we hope, that the time is not far distant, when our beloved youth and children will be well supplied with good reading. To aid in securing this supply, this little work, will make its monthly contributions. Effort shall be made to render it simple, interesting and profitable; and an important aid to parents and guardians, in ‘training up their children, in the way they should go.’ The little works of this kind, published by other Sabbath School Unions, are widely circulated, and precious in their influence. … The contents of this work, will come, principally, under the following heads. Scripture Stories and Illustrations. Interesting Narratives, illustrating the advantages of early piety. [footnote: The original Narratives in this work, shall be matters of fact.] Profitable Anecdotes. Hints to the several members of Sabbath Schools concerning their duty, &c. Interesting Sabbath School Intelligence. Sacred Geography, and Natural History; designed to aid in the study of the Scriptures. This work will be made as original as it may be, without detracting from its interest. Superintendents, and Teachers of Sabbath Schools—Ministers and others, who can make interesting communications, suited to the plan of this work, are, therefore, desired to forward them to the Editor.” [1 (Jan 1829); pp. 1-2]

• Advertisements point out that the Herald was easy to miss: “Valued as it is by its readers, it is yet unknown to many. Being small, it is overlooked.” [Vermont Chronicle 8 May 1829]

source of information: AAS catalog; OCLC; NUC

available: AASHistPer, series 2

• The North Star [Danville, Vermont] reprinted a paragraph about the roles of men and women [9 Dec 1841; p. 4]

bibliography:

• “Youth’s Herald and Sabbath School Magazine.” Vermont chronicle [Bellows Falls, Vermont] 8 May 1829; 3.

• “Vermont Sabbath School Union.” The Middlebury People’s Press [Middlebury, Vermont] 20 May 1829; p. 2.

• “Youth’s Herald and Sabbath School Magazine.” Vermont Watchman and State journal [Montpelier, Vermont] 9 June 1829; p. 3.

• “Sabbath School Agency, in Orange County.” Vermont Chronicle [Bellows Falls, Vermont] 19 June 1829; p. 2.

• “Youth’s Herald,—Vol. II.” Vermont Watchman and State Journal [Montpelier, Vermont] 5 Jan 1830; p. 4.

• “Fifth Annual Report of the Vermont Sabbath School Union.” Vermont Chronicle [Windsor, Vermont] 1 Oct 1830; p. 1.

The Sabbath School Visitant and Juvenile Magazine (also Western Sabbath School Visitant, and Juvenile Magazine) ; 10 Jan-31 Dec 1829

published: Utica, New York: by G. S. Wilson for the Western Sunday School Union.

frequency: semimonthly

description: 16 pp.?; page size, 7″ h • #1 dated 1828

• Circulation: about 1000

• Religious focus

relevant quote: On the closing of the magazine: “It was the oldest Sabbath School periodical in the country; and although its subscription list never exceeded a thousand, (a number quite insufficient for its support), it has been kept up till the present time, by the continued and active efforts of the Society. The closing article says—‘The Visitant is not discontinued for the want of patronage although it never was a source of pecuniary profit. The ill health of the editor is one reason; and the other is a conviction that greater good can be done by circulating the publications of the Parent Society, and by making the religious newspapers of this town the organ of communication with our auxiliaries.’ ” [“Sabbath School Visitant.” Western Recorder 19 Jan 1830]

continues: Sabbath School Visitant (June 1824-Feb 1826) • The Juvenile Magazine (27 Jan 1827-Dec 1828)

continued by: American Sunday School Magazine (for adults)

source of information: NUC; notices, etc., below

available: The Western Recorder reprinted part of a piece on selecting books for Sabbath schools [“Juvenile Literature.” 6 (31 March 1829); p. 51]

bibliography:

• “Juvenile Literature.” Western Recorder 6 (31 March 1829); p. 51.

• “Sabbath School Visitant.” Western Recorder 7 (19 Jan 1830); p. 10.

• “American Sunday School Magazine.” Western Recorder 7 (26 Jan 1830); p. 14.

• “Western Sunday School Union: Further Extracts from the Report.” Western Recorder 7 (1 June 1830); p. 86.

Juvenile Museum ; 1829

edited by: Wilkins F. Tannehill • William T. Berry

published: Nashville, Tennessee

frequency: weekly

description: price, $1.50

relevant information: Proposed; apparently never published

relevant quote: The very modest proposal: “Periodical publications have become so numerous, that proposals for issuing them are, by no means, novel or uncommon. We, with pleasure, witness the literary taste of our country increasing, and we, therefore, cherish the hope that our humble undertaking will meet with success. Another circumstance which raises our expectations is, that no publication of a precisely similar kind has ever been attempted in the western country. It may be deemed the height of arrogance, for us—without the endowment of talents or the advantages of experience—to attempt to offer to the rising generation any thing like a source of amusement. But we hope our endeavors however unsuccessful, will not be mistaken for vanity or presumption.—Young ourselves, (having but little more than centred our teens,) we intend to devote our exertions to the entertainment, if not instruction, of the YOUTHFUL part of the community; and although we have no pretensions to literary eminence, we may occasionally offer something not entirely unworthy the acceptance of more advanced age. We will not promise too much, lest we should fail; we, therefore, only add, that we will endeavor so to conduct our paper as to merit the approbation of its patrons; and that whilst it is a source of pleasure to them, it may be a means of improvement to us. Communications will be received with gratitude and attended to with promptness.” [“Proposals”]

• The proposal was printed in a Georgia newspaper until 9 Sept 1829.

source of information: “Proposals”

bibliography:

• “Proposals.” Western Chronicle [Knoxville, Tennessee] 13 May 1829; p. 4. Also, Cherokee Phoenix and Indians’ Advocate [New Echota, Georgia] 22 July 1829; p. 3.

Youth’s Miscellany ; Jan 1830-1839?

published: Utica, New York: D. Bennett & Co., 1830. Utica, New York: Bennett & Bright, 1831-1839?

frequency: monthly

description: 1830-1831: 16 pp. • Price: 1830, 26¢/ year; 1831, 25¢/ year

relevant information: References mentioning the Miscellany have it published only in 1834. While advertisements in 1830 and 1831 hint that the Miscellany didn’t bring in even enough money to defray expenses, it appears in lists of current New York periodicals until 1839.

relevant quotes:

• On the first issue: “We have been quite pleased with the perusal of the January number, and think it may prove to be a useful little work. One or two of the articles were not particularly adapted to the young; but others were written with peculiar interest.” [“Youth’s Miscellany.” Western Recorder]

• The Miscellany wasn’t lucrative. At the end of 1830, the editor gave a detailed description of future plans in hopes of winning more subscribers: “The Editor of the Miscellany is induced to issue the … Proposals, from the fact, that the first volume, which is now closed, has not defrayed the expenses of paper and printing, and he hopes, by this means, to be enabled to continue the work. … Two hundred more subscribers will be necessary to warrant the commencement of another volume. Those who wish to take it, will please to forward their names and residence by the 1st of January next; and those who have taken it, and wish it no longer, are requested to notify us to that effect prior to that time. … The first number of Vol. 2, will be published about the middle of January next, should the subscription list warrant it. If it is not published about that time, the undertaking will be abandoned.“ [advertisement. Western Recorder]

• The editor promised much for 1831: “This work will contain intelligence from Sunday Schools, and their progress generally: Illustrations of Scripture: select Biographies: Historical Facts; and Moral and Religious essays; together with any other interesting matter, which will improve the youthful mind, and mend the heart.” [Advertisement. Western Recorder]

• The magazine was no more lucrative in 1831 than it was in 1830: “The patronage, it is stated, is insufficient to meet the expenses of publication; but if the efforts made to increase its subscription list are successful by the 5th of January, it will be continued another year. We hope this little work may be supported. Twenty-five cents a year is all that is charged; and though coming from a baptist establishment, we can assure our readers that it is fit for presbyterian children.” [“The Youth’s Miscellany.” Western Recorder]

source of information: Western Recorder ; Williams ; Jeffersonian ; North

bibliography:

• “Youth’s Miscellany.” Western Recorder 7 (16 Feb 1830); p. 2.

• advertisement. Western Recorder 7 (14 Dec 1830); p. 199.

• “The Youth’s Miscellany.” Western Recorder 8 (20 Dec 1831); p. 203.

• Edwin Williams. The New-York Annual Register for 1834. New York: Edwin Williams, 1834; p. 126.

• “Sabbath School Anniversary.” Youth’s Companion 8 (27 Sept 1834); pp. 74-75. [reprinted from the Miscellany]

• Edwin Williams. The New-York Annual Register for 1835. New York: Edwin Williams, 1835; p. 126.

• Edwin Williams. The New-York Annual Register for 1836. New York: Edwin Williams, 1836; p. 143.

• “List of Newspapers and Periodicals, Published in the State of New-York, Jan. 1, 1839.” (corrected list) The Jeffersonian [Albany, New York] 1 (2 Feb 1839); pp. 407-408. [google books]

• S. N. D. North. History and Present Condition of the Newspaper and Periodical Press N.p.: N.p., 1881; p. 399.

The Parent’s Gift, or Youth’s Magazine ; Jan 1830-after Aug 1832

cover/masthead: July 1832 | Aug 1832

published: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania: I. M. Allen; for the Baptist General Tract Society.

frequency: monthly; 1 vol/year

description: 1830: 12 pp.; page size, 6.75″ h x 4″ w

• Vol 3 #7 is July 1832 issues.

relevant quote:

• Introduction: “Dear Children, Should your parents present this Magazine to you as a monthly gift, we hope you will read it with care, and remember the truths it may contain. We feel desirous that you should have religious instruction suited to your age and capacity, and have therefore taken pains to prepare this work for your use.” [1 (Jan 1830): 1]

• The editor died suddenly in 1830: “The selections for this Number [Aug 1830] of the Parent’s Gift were among the last labours of the late Editor. … [W]hen the Editor selected this article he was in his usual health, and had before him the prospect of a long and useful life ….” [“To the Youthful Readers of This Magazine.” 1 (Aug 1830); p. 95]

source of information: 1830 bound vol; Matthews; AAS catalog

available: AASHistPer, series 2

bibliography:

• Harriet L. Matthews. “Children’s Magazines.” Bulletin of Bibliography. 1 (April 1899); pp. 133-136.

The Juvenile Repository ; Jan-27 March 1830

published: Providence, Rhode Island: Samuel S. Wilson

frequency: biweekly

description: Page size, 11″ h: “it is a small half sheet in the quarto form” [notice]

• price, 50¢/ year

• 27 March 1830 is vol 1 #7

relevant information: Perhaps written by students: “The principal object of the Repository, is the improvement of young writers in composition”. [notice]

source of information: AAS catalog; notices, etc., below

bibliography:

• notice. The Rural Repository 6 (13 March 1830); p. 167.

Youth’s Magazine; or, Spirit of the Juvenile Miscellany ; Jan-Dec 1830

cover/masthead: 1830

published: AAS: Boston, Massachusetts: Putnam & Hunt; publisher at 3 Cornhill.

• NUC: Boston, Massachusetts: Freeman Hunt.

frequency: monthly

description: 36 pp.; page size, 5.75″ h

relevant quote: The purpose: “The object of this little work is to furnish children and young persons with a Magazine devoted to their moral and intellectual imp[ro]vement, as well as amusement.” [1 (Feb 1830); back cover (cover page 4)]

source of information: AASHistPer; AAS catalog; NUC

available: AASHistPer, series 2

bibliography:

• “Death of Freeman Hunt.” The New York Times [New York, New York] 4 March 1858; p. 4.

Classical Journal and Scholar’s Review (also, The Classical Journal and Scholars’ Album) ; 10 Jan 1830-Dec 1831 • Juvenile Rambler ; 4 Jan-18 Jan 1832, 1 Feb 1832-26 Dec 1833

cover/masthead: 4 Jan 1832 | 11 Jan-26 Dec 1832

edited by: John P. Lathrop, 1830-1831

• William A. Alcott, 1832-1833

published: Boston, Massachusetts: Putnam & Hunt, Jan-Feb 1830.

• Boston, Massachusetts: Wait, Greene & Co. & J. W. J. Niles, March-Dec 1830; at 13 Court St.

• Boston, Massachusetts: John Allen, 4 Jan 1832. “Third edition” by Allen & Goddard. Printed Hiram Tupper, at 19 Water St.

• Boston, Massachusetts: Allen & Goddard, 11-18 Jan 1832; publisher at 11 School St. Printed Hiram Tupper, at 19 Water St.

• Boston, Massachusetts: John Allen, 8 Feb-18 July 1832; publisher at 11 School St. Printed Hiram Tupper; 8 Feb-7 March, Tupper at 19 Water St.; 14 March-8 Aug, Tupper at 127 Washington St.

• Boston, Massachusetts: Allen & Ticknor, 25 July 1832-June 1833. Printed 25 July-8 Aug 1832, Hiram Tupper, at 127 Washington St. Printed 22 Aug- 1832, 26 Sept 1832, Kane & Co., at 127 Washington St. Printed 3 Oct-19 Dec 1832, Isaac R. Butts, in School St.

• Boston, Massachusetts: Brown & Pierce, and Ford & Damrell, 1 July-26 Dec 1833.

frequency: 1830-1831 (as Review), monthly: 10th day; 1 vol/ year.

• 4 Jan-18 Jan 1832, 1 Feb 1832-26 Dec 1833 (as Rambler), weekly: Wednesday

description: Issue #1 in 4 versions. • 1830-1831: 24 pp.; duodecimo. Price, $1/ year.

• 4 Jan-18 Jan, 1 Feb 1832-19 Dec 1832, 2 Jan-26 Dec 1833: 4 pp.; quarto. 26 Dec 1832: 8 pp. Price, 2¢/ copy; $1/ year.

• 4-18 Jan, 1 Feb-26 Dec 1832: page size, 10.5″ h x 8.5″ w

relevant quotes:

• Proposal: “Classical Journal and Scholars’s Album.—This is the title of a proposed monthly, the prospectus of which has just been placed in our hands.—It is to be published by Messrs. Putnam & Hunt, on the tenth of each month, commencing in January, in numbers of 24 duodecimo pages each, at $1 a year. The design of the publication as announced, ‘is to present a medium through which the best compositions in the different schools, may be submitted to the public. It will also contain familiar essays on the sciences; intelligence relating to schools generally; and critical notices of elementary and other works in the department of juvenile literature.’ Mr. John P. Lathrop, its conductor, is at present engaged in the labors of instruction; and is said to be qualified, by talents, education and experience, to manage such a publication to the satisfaction of those who would be likely to patronise it.” [“Classical Journal and Scholars’s Album.” American Traveller 20 Nov 1829]

• From the prospectus: “It will be an important part of the plan of the work, to present a medium through which the best compositions in the different schools, may be submitted to the public. It will also contain familiar essays on the sciences; intelligence relating to schools generally; and critical notices of elementary and other works in the department of juvenile literature.” [“Classical Journal.” Christian Register 20 Feb 1830]

• The Feb 1830 issue was late: “An apology is due to our subscribers for the late appearance of the present number of the Journal; but sickness and death, in the family of the editor, have prevented his devoting the time necessary to the preparation of the matter for the press. He hopes that he will not again have occasion to ask the indulgence of his friends for a similar delay. The third number will appear on the 20th insant, after which, the numbers will be issued at the time stated in the Prospectus.” [“To Subscribers.” Classical Journal 1 (Feb 1830); p. 48.]

• The “demise” of the Classical Journal and its replacement by the Rambler was explained humorously in the Rambler’s “autobiography”; the Rambler claimed that its original masthead had come from its “older brother … whom they had very cruelly destroyed.” The editor explained further: “The truth is, his brother was a feeble child, not able to go alone even when he was two years old. The town refused to provide for him, and he was on the point of being turned into the streets to perish, when we provided a private room in the storehouse, where he now lies quietly, and only took his shoes and collar, to give to the ungrateful Rambler!” [“Adventures of the Juvenile Rambler.” 1 (1 Feb 1832); p. 13]

• When Alcott took over as editor in 1832, he was contributing to the American Annals of Education; the publisher of the Annals also published the first new issue of the periodical: “One of our correspondents in the present number, remarks on the advantages which would be derived from a newspaper devoted to schools, and used as a weekly reader. One publication of this kind has been attempted; but as far as we have seen its numbers, it seems to us to be very imperfectly adapted to the object. A gentleman of experience in teaching, who contemplated and proposed a work of this kind many years since, has prepared a specimen number just issued by the publishers of the Annals of Education. The character of this number, satisfies us, that we were not mistaken in believing the editor peculiarly qualified for the task; and we cannot but anticipate much good from his labors. In order to bring it if possible within the reach of all; the work is offered on terms so low, that the publishers cannot be remunerated, or the work continued, without a large subscription. We hope the attempt will succeed. [“School Newspaper”; p. 88]

• Introductory: “Among the multiplied periodicals of the day, scarcely one is adapted to the classes of our schools. Is it not surprising that an object so interesting has been so long overlooked? Schools are the nurseries of society. Their usefulness depends much on the habits and love of reading they produce. The love of reading would soon break up the haunts of folly and mischief, and operate powerfully upon the public opinion of children and youth. Low amusements, like darkness, will disappear before the light of knowledge. Thousands of teachers and tens of thousands of children appear to labor almost in vain, for want of some publication calculated to arrest the attention of the young, and to render a book delightful.” [“To Parents and Teachers.” 1 (4 Jan 1832); p. 1]

• The change of titles and format was explained in what may have been the Rambler’s prospectus: “The publishers of the ‘Classical Journal and Scholars Review,’ found reason to believe, that a school newspaper on a plan long since formed by an experience teacher of youth, would be more generally useful, and more acceptable to their subscribers. They have therefore committed the work to his care, and it will hereafter be published under the name of the Juvenile Rambler—embracing a greater amount and variety of matter, at the same price—with the hope that a large subscription will defray its expenses. It will be published on Wednesday of each week; and will contain short and simple articles on a variety of subjects. 1. Sketches of History. 2. Geography, Voyages and Travels. 3. Articles on Natural History and Science. 4. Accounts of books for the young. 5. Parables, Fables, and Proverbs. 6. Biographical notices, especially of the young. 7. Poetical pieces and tales. 8. Summary of Intelligence—miscellaneous notices, anecdotes, &c.” [“Advertisement.” 1 (11 Jan 1832); p. 5]

• The Rambler told its own story in an early issue: “I was born, Jan. 2, 1832. Like every work of man, I was put together part by part—now one limb and then another—and last of all furnished with a head! … About this there was some difficulty. At least fifty were examined, before one was found which they thought would answer. … At length they put on one, and I began to breathe and to walk a little; but it made me appear so much like my neighbors, that they were afraid I should not be known. So they took it off, and put on that which you see now. But they were afraid that I should not live at first with only one head; and so they put on that of my elder brother (the Classical Journal) …. At length I was allowed to go abroad—and never did Rambler go farther or faster. In fact, although it is a secret, I did steal out a little with my first head, and before my limbs were fairly shaped, and I was pretty well received too ….” [“Adventures of the Juvenile Rambler.” 1 (1 Feb 1832); p. 13]

• After three issues, the publisher paused to take stock: “The next paper will not be issued until the first of February, in order to give time for ascertaining the number of Subscribers. Those who have received papers, are requested to give notice of the number they shall need as soon as possible, and forward the amount due, as it is not intended to print copies beyond the demand. As the experiment is a novel one, those who wish will now be permitted to subscribe for six months, in order to satisfy themselves of the nature and value of the publication.” [1 (18 Jan 1832); p. 9]

• The editor of the Rose Bud (1832-1839) was amused to find that a rival periodical so resembled hers: “Since commencing our little work, we have become acquainted with two periodicals of a design very similar to our own. … [One] work is entitled, The Juvenile Rambler, and is printed in Boston. We saw this paper for the first time last week, although it has reached the 37th number. It is remarkable that two persons entirely unconnected with each other should undertake plans so nearly alike, as the Rambler’s and our own. The Rambler, like the Rose Bud, is printed on a small quarto sheet, with three columns on a page, and is issued weekly. Its price is One Dollar per annum ….” [1 (13 Oct 1832); pp. 26-27]

• The Rose Bud also was amused when the Rambler reprinted some of its work, as disclosed in a parody letter: “i am subskriber to a nice papur in Bostun called the Jewwenile Ramblurr, and it has had the dissernment October 2d to publish my fust letter to you …. wat i want of you is, to let the Charlestun folks kno about the extrac, in the Juwwenile Ramblurr, and then they will see i ant considurd so insignifekant, in Bostun as what i am in my native city, i guess them Bostun folks has some gumption.” [2 (19 Oct 1833); p. 31]

• The editor of the American Annals of Education was candid about the reason for the Rambler’s demise: “We did all in our power to secure it such a character as we approved; but its price and subscription list did not authorise a sufficient amount of illustrations. The Parley Magazine, with its splendid illustrations, only needed a change in its character, and the Rambler has been united with it, to accomplish the great object more effectually.” [“Parley’s”; p. 100]

• The Southern Rose Bud eulogized its rival: “The able Editor of this little paper has transferred his talents to ‘Parley’s Magazine,’ which will lend that excellent work an additional value.” [“The Juvenile Rambler.” Southern Rose Bud 22 Feb 1834]

• The editor of the Rambler was less enthusiastic a few years later: “We were employed by the philanthropic proprietor of the ‘Juvenile Rambler,’ to edit that paper for him about two years, till it was merged in Parley’s Magazine. Subsequently we edited Parley’s Magazine four years—we will not say with what success—we leave that to others. We will only say that had we sailed under the flag of a sect or party, and had other people been as willing as ourselves to ‘work for nothing and keep themselves,’ we have no doubt both works would have been better supported than they were; and we might have been willing longer to bear the burden of editing the latter.” [“Youth’s Penny Paper”; p. 336]

relevant information:

• Occasionally, a list of the contents of individual issues was reprinted elsewhere: “Juvenile Rambler.” Spirit of the Age and Journal of Humanity 1 (8 Aug 1833); p. 3. #38: “The Juvenile Rambler, No. 38.” Spirit of the Age and Journal of Humanity 1 (19 Sept 1833); p. 3. #39: “The Juvenile Rambler, No. 39.” Spirit of the Age and Journal of Humanity 1 (26 Sept 1833); p. 3. #42: “The Juvenile Rambler, No. 42.” Spirit of the Age and Journal of Humanity 1 (17 Oct 1833); p. 3. #43: “The Juvenile Rambler—No. 43.” Spirit of the Age and Journal of Humanity 1 (24 Oct 1833); p. 3. #46: “The Juvenile Rambler—No. 46.” Spirit of the Age and Journal of Humanity 1 (14 Nov 1833); p. 3. #47: “The Juvenile Rambler—No. 47.” Spirit of the Age and Journal of Humanity 1 (21 Nov 1833); p. 3. #49: “The Juvenile Rambler—No. 49.” Spirit of the Age and Journal of Humanity 1 (5 Dec 1833); p. 3. #50: “The Juvenile Rambler—No. 50.” Spirit of the Age and Journal of Humanity 1 (12 Dec 1833); p. 3.

absorbed by: Parley’s Magazine ; 1833-1844

available: AASHistPer, series 2

• “Sketches of the South” was written for the Rambler, but received after its merger with Parley’s Magazine and published there [12 April 1834; p. 40]

excerpts online

source of information: 1832 volume; AASHistPer, series 2; Dechert; AAS catalog

bibliography:

• notice. Boston Patriot and Mercantile Advertiser [Boston, Massachusetts] 18 Nov 1829; p. 2. Also, “New Monthly Magazine.” Christian Watchman 10 (20 Nov 1829); p. 186. Also “New Magazine.” Evening Post [New York, New York] 20 Nov 1829; p. 2.

• “Classical Journal and Scholars’s Album.” American Traveller [Boston, Massachusetts] 20 Nov 1829; p. 3.

• review. Christian Watchman 11 (15 Jan 1830); p. 10.

• “Literary Notices.” Ladies’ Magazine and Literary Gazette 3 (1 Feb 1830); p. 95.

• “The Classical Journal, and Scholars’ Review.” Christian Register 9 (6 Feb 1830); p. 22.

• “Classical Journal.” Christian Register 9 (20 Feb 1830; p. 32.

• “School Newspaper.” American Annals of Education. 2 (Jan 1832); p. 88. online

• “Juvenile Rambler.” The Connecticut Mirror 14 Jan 1832; p. 3.

• notice. Ladies’ Magazine 5 (Feb 1832); p. 92. online

• “Notices.” American Annals of Education 1 Feb 1832; p. 111.

• review. The Juvenile Miscellany, 3rd series 2 (March/April 1832); p. 108. online

• “Juvenile Rambler, or Family and School Journal.” New York Farmer 5 (3 May 1832); p. 172.

• “Juvenile Paper.” The Rural Repository 9 (8 Sept 1832); p. 63.

• “Juvenile Periodicals.” Rose Bud. 1 (13 Oct 1832); pp. 26-27. online

• notice. Christian Watchman. 14 (22 Feb 1833); p. 31. online

• “Items for Youth.” Rose Bud. 1 (15 June 1833); p. 167. online

• “Juvenile Rambler.” Spirit of the Age and Journal of Humanity 1 (8 Aug 1833); p. 3.

• Humorous piece. Southern Rose Bud. 2 (19 Oct 1833); p. 31. online

• “Parley’s Magazine.” American Annals of Education. 4 (Feb 1834); p. 100. online

• “The Juvenile Rambler.” Southern Rose Bud. 2 (22 Feb 1834); p. 103. online

• “School Libraries.” American Annals of Education 4 (May 1834);p. 215.

• “A Young Teacher.” American Annals of Education 4 (Oct 1834); p. 451.

• “The Youth’s Penny Paper.” American Annals of Education. 8 (July 1838); pp. 335-336. online

• Harriet L. Matthews. “Children’s Magazines.” Bulletin of Bibliography. 1 (April 1899); pp. 133-136.

• Dorothy Dechert. “The Merry Family: A Study of Merry’s Museum, 1841-1872, and of the Various Periodicals that Merged with It.” Master’s thesis. Columbia University, 1942.

• Betty Longenecker Lyon. “A History of Children’s Secular Magazines Published in the United States from 1789-1899.” PhD diss. Johns Hopkins, 1942; pp. 11, 21, 23, 25, 88-93.

Expostulator, or Young Catholic’s Guide ; 31 March 1830-23 March 1831

cover/masthead: 1830-1831

published: Boston, Massachusetts: William Smith; office at 75 Kilby St.

frequency: weekly

description: 4 pp.; price, $1.50/ year; page size, 11″ h

• Religious focus: Catholic

relevant quotes:

• On the founding: “The following considerations have led the Editor to publish this little paper. He saw the great, pervading interest, which the Holy and Venerable, Catholic Church has already excited in the minds of his numerous, pious and patriotic fellow citizens, who are not of the ancient household of the faith, yet who are actuated by a laudable desire of ascertaining and walking in the way, the truth, and the life of salvation. He has with sorrow, felt that the Cooperation of the Wicked One have been, and still are, at their impious work, in order to seduce souls from the narrow way which leads to life …. He has painfully witnessed the uncharitable conduct, the interested calumnies, with which the Church established upon St. Peter’s faith, has been so strangely aspersed.” [“Address of the Editor.” 1 (31 March 1830); p. 3.]

• With the end of the paper, all issues were available for purchase: “The Patrons of the Expostulator are informed that the present Number completes the Volume. No more will be issued after to-day. Persons desirous of having all the Numbers, from the beginning, for the purpose of having the same bound into a book form, can be supplied at this office.” [notice. 2 (23 March 1831); p. 206.]

source of information: OCLC; AAS catalog; AASHistPer, series 2; “Prospectus”

available: AASHistPer, series 2

• A piece from the Expostulator was reprinted in 1830: “Pride” [The Jesuit 1 (1 May 1830); p. 284]

bibliography:

• “Prospectus.” The Jesuit 1 (20 Feb 1830); p. 204.

• “Pride.” The Jesuit 1 (1 May 1830); p. 284.

• John B. Ebel. “Catholic Press, Defender of Faith.” The Catholic Advance [Wichita, Kansas] 12 Feb 1970; p. 12.

The Monthly Repository and Library of Entertaining Knowledge ; June 1830-1835

edited by: Francis S. Wiggins

published: New York, New York: Francis S. Wiggins; publisher at 61 Fulton St., 1830

• Albany, New York: Tracy Doolittle; publisher at 37 State St.

frequency: monthly

description: Page numbers varied: June, Aug, Oct-Dec 1830, 36 pp.; July, Sept 1830, 24 pp. 1831-1835, 36 pp.

• Prices: $1/ year in advance or to those “who may purchase for charitable distribution”; if paying after fifth issue, $1.50/ year

relevant information:

• The first bound volume (June 1830-May 1831) was priced at $1.25.

• The New England Christian Herald published the contents for Aug 1831 [31 Aug 1831]

• The Youth’s Companion and Weekly Family Visitor published contents for July 1832 [11 Aug 1832]

• The Repository probably ended in 1835, when Wiggins moved to Auburn, New York; there he edited the Western Banner. Wiggins edited eight periodicals, in New Jersey, New York, and Pennsylvania.

relevant quotes:

• From early notices: “The object of this Work is to afford useful and entertaining knowledge, not only to youth, but also to those more advanced in years, and who may not have the means to procure, or leisure to peruse more elaborate works. The desire, and constant aim of the editor will be to render this little publication popular and instructive to every class of readers; a work that the parent may with perfect safety place in the hands of his child, or the tutor present to his deserving pupil as the reward of merit. As a Volume it shall not be unworthy a place in the Family Library.” [Family Visiter and Sunday School Magazine 19 June 1830]

• The Hampden Whig described it: “It contains a diversified, interesting mass of historical, scientific, and biographical sketches, chiefly designed for youthful readers, and we doubt not it will prove of incalculable advantage to this class of our community.” [19 Jan 1831]

source of information: 1830-1831 bound volume at google books; APS; notices, etc., below

available:

• page images at hathitrust.org

• AASHistPer, series 2

• American Periodicals Series

• The Christian Advocate and Journal and Zion’s Herald reprinted more than one piece: “Fraternal Love” [5 (26 Nov 1830); p. 52]; “The American Character” [5 (27 May 1831); p. 156]

The Cabinet of Religion, Education, Literature, Science, and Intelligence reprinted “Bombardment of Algiers” [5 (May 1831); pp. 259-260]

• The Newport Mercury reprinted a poem by Lydia Sigourney [28 April 1832; p. 1]

• The Essex Gazette reprinted “Ruins of Palmyra” [6 Oct 1832; p. 1]

bibliography:

• “The Monthly Repository and Library of Entertaining Knowledge.” Family Visiter and Sunday School Magazine 2 (19 June 1830); p. 156.

• “The Monthly Repository and Library of Entertaining Knowledge.” Christian Watchman 11 (30 July 1830); p. 1.

• The Monthly Repository and Library of Entertaining Knowledge. American Masonick Record and Albany Literary Journal 4 (2 Oct 1830); p. 287.

• “The Monthly Repository and Library of Entertaining Knowledge.” Western Recorder 7 (9 Nov 1830); p. 180.

• The following article. Christian Advocate and Journal and Zion’s Herald 5 (26 Nov 1830); p. 52.

• notice. Hampden Whig [Springfield, Massachusetts] 19 Jan 1831; p. 3.

• introduction fo “Bombardment of Algiers.” The Cabinet of Religion, Education, Literature, Science, and Intelligence 5 (May 1831); p. 159.

• “The Monthly Repository and Library of Entertaining Knowledge.” Christian Advocate and Journal and Zion’s Herald 5 (27 May 1831); p. 156.

• “Monthly Repository and Library of Entertaining Knowledge.” New England Christian Herald 2 (31 Aug 1831); p. 191.

• “New Books & Periodicals at Colman’s.” Eastern Argus [Portland, Maine] 27 Sept 1831; p. 3.

• “The Monthly Repository and Library of Entertaining Knowledge.” New England Christian Herald 2 (28 Sept 1831); p. 207.

• “Monthly Repository. No. 9.” City Gazette [Charleston, South Carolina] 10 April 1832; p. 1.

• “The Monthly Repository and Library of Entertaining Knowledge.” Youth’s Companion and Weekly Family Visitor 1 (11 Aug 1832); p. 79.

• The Monthly Repository and Library of Entertaining Knowledge. Norfolk Advertiser and Independent Politician [Dedham, Massachusetts] 31 Aug 1832; p. 2.

• advertisement. Charleston Daily Courier [Charleston, South Carolina] 3 Sept 1832; p. 4.

• “The Monthly Repository and Library of Entertaining Knowledge.” New England Christian Herald 3 (19 Sept 1832); p. 202.

• advertisement. Hampden Whig [Springfield, Massachusetts] 11 Sept 1833; p. 4.

• “Monthly Repository and Library of Entertaining Knowledge.” Zion’s Herald 4 (9 Oct 1833); p. 216.

• “Agents for New Publications.” American Railroad Journal 4 (24 Jan 1835); p. 48.

• obituary of Francis S. Wiggins. Christian Advocate and Journal 14 (6 March 1840); p. 116.

• Harriet L. Matthews. “Children’s Magazines.” Bulletin of Bibliography. 1 (April 1899); p. 135.

• “Many History-Laden Antique Pieces Are Found in Jefferson City Homes.” The Sunday News and Tribune [Jefferson City, Missouri] 3 Nov 1935; p. 10.

• Betty Longenecker Lyon. “A History of Children’s Secular Magazines Published in the United States from 1789-1899.” PhD diss. Johns Hopkins, 1942; p. 10.

The Juvenile Key ; 18 Sept 1830-9 March 1833 • Family Pioneer and Juvenile Key ; 17 March 1833-23 May 1837

cover/masthead: 1831

edited by: J. Griffin (as “Oliver Oldwise,” 1830)

published: Brunswick, Maine: Joseph Griffin. Printed by Griffin’s children, Zerui’ah-Juan, Joseph Warren, & George Griffin.

frequency: weekly & biweekly: “Four pages of the Key are printed weekly for village subscribers and eight pages upon a single sheet once a fortnight to accommodate those who receive their papers by mail.” [“Terms.” Juvenile Key 1 (26 Feb 1831); p. 100.]

description: 1830: page size, height, 9 in. x width, 7 in.; 4 pp.; price, 75¢/year; 200 subscribers

• 1831: 4 pp.; page size untrimmed, 8.5″ h x 6.5″ w. price: 75¢/ year for weekly; $1/ year for biweekly

• 1833: 4 pp.; page size: height, 12 in. x width, 9 in.; price: $1/volume, payable in advance; 350 subscribers.

relevant information: The Key advocated for temperance and against slavery and the death penalty. [Richardson; p. 79]

relevant quotes:

• The Youth’s Companion reprinted pieces from the Key and couldn’t resist punning on the purported editor’s name: “The articles in the Companion of Dec. 8th entitled ‘Shooting one another,’ and ‘Temptation,’ were copied from the ‘Juvenile Key.’ This is a small miscellaneous paper, published at Brunswick, Me. by Z. J. and J. W. Griffin. It is about one third the size of the Companion, and is printed in quite a neat style. The enterprising printers are lads, sons of Mr. Griffin, a printer. The editor is ‘Oliver Oldwise.’ We should think Youngwise would be more appropriate. The paper contains useful articles, but is not intended to be of a religious character.” [“Correction”]

• One editor was quite admiring: “[The Juvenile Key] is the title of a little paper published in Brunswick, Me. by two children, one but seven, the other but nine years of age. The typographical execution is good, and highly creditable to the industrious publishers.—The project is a good one, the example still better.” [“The Juvenile Key.” Pittsburgh Weekly Gazette]

• The Key was quite popular among readers in Maine: “The Key had so good a reputation among its patrons that no less than seventy copies were sent to our bindery to be bound. To this day we hear it frequently spoken of by its then young readers, now at mid-life, as having by its precepts and the example of its young publishers made a strong and favorable impression upon their minds. One case we will name. A boy in a neighboring town, who obtained his copy by services as our agent, often reminds us, that he owed much to the Key for his early habits of industry and economy. He is now worth his tens of thousands.” [Richardson; p. 77]

• At least one other editor admired the Key’s young editors: “In a complimentary notice of the Key and its publishers, by B. B. Thatcher, Esq. then editor of the Mercantile Journal of Boston, he said, ‘such children would get a living upon a sand-bank!’ ” [Richardson; p. 77]

source of information: 1831 issue; Kelly; Richardson

available: AASHistPer, series 2

bibliography:

• “The Juvenile Key.” Pittsburgh Weekly Gazette [Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania] 29 Oct 1830; p. 3.

Boston Recorder. 15 (Oct 20, 1830); p. 166. online

• “Correction.” The Youth’s Companion 4 (22 Dec 1830); p. 124.

• “Juvenile Key.” Reformer 12 (Jan 1831); p. 16.

• H. W. Richardson. “The Press of Cumberland County.” In History of the Press of Maine, ed. Joseph Griffin. Brunswick: 1872; pp. 77-79. [archive.org]

• Clement F. Robinson, “The Juvenile Key.” The Fossil. April 1957; pp. 254-258.

Children’s Periodicals of the United States, ed. R. Gordon Kelly. Westport, Connecticut & London, England: Greenwood Press, 1984.

• Gillian Avery. Behold the Child: American Children and Their Books, 1621-1922. Baltimore, Maryland: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1994; p. 82.

Juvenile Magazine, and Youth’s Monthly Visiter ; Oct 1830, Feb 1831-after April 1832

edited by: Luther Pratt

published: New York, New York

• Printers: Oct 1830, J. B. Requa, 245 Spring St.; Feb 1831, April 1832: J. H. Turney, 133 East Broadway

frequency: erratic: vol 1 #1 is Oct 1830; vol 1 #2 is Feb 1831; vol 1 #10 is April 1832 • 1 vol/ year

description: 36 pp.; page size, 7.5″ h (untrimmed) x 4″ w (trimmed); price, $1.50/ volume, “No subscription received for less than a volume.”

relevant quotes:

• Introduction: “It will be the unremitting exertion of the editor, to render this little work a welcome Visiter both in schools, and its families; to excite in the rising generation, a laudable ambition in the acquirement of such qualifications as will render them useful members of society, enabling them to ‘act well their parts’ in such places as they shall be called to fill, whether in the church, in the affairs of state, or in the domestic circle; to inculcate every moral and social virtue, and above all, to inspire the tender mind with a due reverence and affection for the Supreme Being. To this end, he will endeavour, to the best of his abilities, to exhibit and illustrate to his youthful readers, in plain and simple language, the elementary, or first principles of Philosophy, Astronomy, and Geography. … Biographical sketches of celebrated characters, both ancient and modern, as well as such historical facts as will be most useful, shall occasionally be given; together with such moral and interesting tales, founded on fact, or probability, as will prove at once instructive and entertaining to youth of both sexes: but every thing of a legendary nature, will be carefully avoided. To draw the youthful genius into exercises of composition, its pages will always be open to such juvenile productions as shall be judged correct in sentiment, and readily inserted. … It cannot be expected that any one number will embrace all the subjects above mentioned, but they shall be attended to as occasion may require. Nor must it be expected that the work will be entirely original. The editor will occasionally avail himself of the talents and ingenuity of others; always, however, as far as practicable, giving credit to the authors from whom he shall borrow, or the publications from which he shall extract. This he thinks proper to mention, as there are many publications at the present day, whose authors, or compilers, pay so little regard to this act of justice, that it is very difficult to distinguish between the original and selected.” [1 (Oct 1830); pp. 1-3]

• Printed in 1832, the prospectus was positively patriotic: “In a country like ours, where no other distinctions exist than those of real merit, where all are equally eligible to the highest offices in the gift of the people; and where each individual has a voice in the affairs of our common country, it is obvious, that the diffusion of useful knowledge among youth, is the only means of perpetuating the blessings we enjoy. To this end, we will endeavor, to the best of our ability, to exhibit and illustrate to our youthful readers, in plain and perspicuous language, the elementary, or first principles of the most useful branches of education; particularly natural philosophy, astronomy, and geography. Those sciences are peculiarly calculated to strike the mind with admiration of the Divine attributes; and to serve as a guard against those principles of infidelity, which some misguided persons are endeavoring to propagate: principles which would sap the foundation of all human happiness, and reduce mankind to a state of barbarism.” [“Prospectus”]

source of information: Oct 1830, Feb 1831, April 1832 bound issues; NUC; OCLC; AAS catalog

bibliography:

• “New Magazine.” American Traveller [Boston, Massachusetts] 29 Oct 1830; p. 2.

• “Prospectus of the Juvenile Magazine; and Youth’s Monthly Visitor.” The Long-Island Star [Brooklyn, New York] 28 March 1832; p. 3. Also, 6 Feb 1833; p. 3.

The Mentor and Youth’s Instructive Companion ; 15 Dec 1830-after Jan 1831

edited by: S. Wild

published: New York, New York: S. Wild; publisher at 55 Nassau St.

frequency: semimonthly

description: 16 pp; octavo; price, $1/ year outside New York, New York; $1.25/ year in New York, New York; in New York City, it was delivered by carriers.

relevant quotes:

• The editor’s description: “We are not aware that there is any work at present published in the United States, of that character to which the Mentor aspires—a Magazine for youth, consisting almost wholly of original articles, written expressly for the work, and calculated at once to improve the heart, expand the mind, and amuse the fancy of the reader. As the only sure ground of goodness, it will be our constant aim to excite in the bosom of youth a feeling of love and reverence towards their Maker—and as connected and inseparable therefrom, of love towards their parents and all mankind. In endeavoring to develope the intellectual faculties of youth, it will be our great object to make our readers thinkers, by presenting them with matter likely to produce reflection—without which reading is useless, and knowledge to the mind what undigested food is to the body. To amuse the fancy of our readers, our pages will present a constant succession of original tales, sometimes serious, at others humorous, but in all cases conveying some useful lesson. Our poetical articles will be numerous, and such, we flatter ourselves, as may tend to form in the minds of our readers, a proper taste and correct judgment in literature as well as morals.” [Vermont Watchman]

• “We have just received the first No. of ‘The Mentor and Youth’s Instructive Companion,’ published in the city of New-York, by S. Wild Editor and proprietor. It is a neat publication on a medium sheet, containing 16 octavo pages. It is designed more immediately, as its title imports, for the instruction and amusement of youth. The first number displays a good share of judgment and taste in composition and choice of subjects. We wish the publisher success in his undertaking. Terms: published semi-monthly, at $1 per annum, in advance.” [“New Publications”]

• The Rural Repository was more verbose: “Judging from what little we have seen from the pen of Mr. Wild, we consider him eminently qualified for the pleasing, though arduous task he has undertaken …. For the Mentor is calculated not only to please the fancy, but to convey instruction to the mind of youth; and withal, as the number before us evinces, not only to win their attention for the moment, but to produce in their minds the salutary habit of reflecting upon what they read.”

source of information: notices, etc., below; Lyon; OCLC

bibliography:

• notice. American Sentinel [Middletown, Connecticut] 22 Dec 1830; p. 3.

• advertisement. Vermont Watchman and State Gazette [Montpelier, Vermont] 4 Jan 1831; p. 3.

• “New Publications.” Evangelical Magazine and Gospel Advocate 2 (8 Jan 1831); p. 13.

• notice. Rural Repository 7 (29 Jan 1831); p. 143.

• Betty Longenecker Lyon. “A History of Children’s Secular Magazines Published in the United States from 1789-1899.” PhD diss. Johns Hopkins, 1942; pp. 11, 21, 84-87.

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